38-200 Post base in cabin?

driftless

Member II
Blogs Author
Here's my guess as to what happened.
This is from my experience of pulling out my "compression" post in order to replace the rotted plywood backer piece that surrounds the mast. That plywood is what the wood trim pieces around the mast at the headliner screw into, but seems to hold little other purpose - maybe it once held some long-since rusted away headliner staples.

First - that post was wedged in there tight and was not easy to get out. It took me a lot of "tapping" on it hard with a mallet and wood blocked to get it to budge. Trying not to tear the headliner on the top end was an additional concern. I think that could explain the deformation at the post base. They may have tried prying up to get some clearance. Guessing they pulled the post out when the flooring was redone?

When they put it back in, they may have omitted the plywood up top, and/or decided to shim both top and bottom to make it easier to go back in? Your headliner doesn't look severely deflected upwards, so I'm guessing there is still some sort of spacer at the top? Plywood, puck, or both?

I'd say as long as the post is anchored both top and bottom - through bolted to deck and bolted/screwed to mast plate - it shouldn't matter which end it's shimmed on, so long as it's tight.
 

Joliba

1988 E38-200 Contributing Member
Replacing the spacer with something impervious to rot is a good idea. However, due to the tensioning function of the post, thru-bolting at the mast step plate would be the most secure attachment. Access to the underside of the plate to position the nuts for these bolts appears difficult if even possible at all without unstepping the mast and lifting the plate due to the TAFG. Using machine screws into tapped holes in the plate may be an alternative. Are you able to reach the nuts?
I’ll post a picture of mine.
 
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David Grimm

E38-200
The three screws at the bottom appear to be 10-24'S. Not sure if there are nuts underneath the plate or if its tapped. There is no way to reach under the plate. Either way we're going to need a lot of PB blaster to break them free. The ceiling feels solid. Not sure whats going on under the vinyl
 

u079721

Contributing Partner
Wonder what's up with your mast mounted table support. Never seen one like that - do you think it's original?

I'd be amazed if those bolts are tapped into the mast plate, as that application just screams out for robust backing for the bolts - but I've been wrong before and will again. Since that post is under tension, not compression, I would seriously consider just leaving things as they are till such time as you have the mast pulled and can unbolt the mast plate. Maybe coat the wood with some epoxy for the time being. That spot shouldn't see that much water.
 

David Grimm

E38-200
Wonder what's up with your mast mounted table support. Never seen one like that - do you think it's original?

I'd be amazed if those bolts are tapped into the mast plate, as that application just screams out for robust backing for the bolts - but I've been wrong before and will again. Since that post is under tension, not compression, I would seriously consider just leaving things as they are till such time as you have the mast pulled and can unbolt the mast plate. Maybe coat the wood with some epoxy for the time being. That spot shouldn't see that much water.
The table is not original. It is a little bit smaller from what I was told. Using the mast as a support is way better then a typical table base. More room for your legs. It's tight as it is. The ability to drop the table and integrate it as a bed is gone. Not that I would ever want that many people sleeping on the boat. I think I will tape a waxed cardboard ring around the wood base and epoxy it. Seems like the right way to go.
 

driftless

Member II
Blogs Author
The table is not original. It is a little bit smaller from what I was told. Using the mast as a support is way better then a typical table base. More room for your legs. It's tight as it is. The ability to drop the table and integrate it as a bed is gone. Not that I would ever want that many people sleeping on the boat. I think I will tape a waxed cardboard ring around the wood base and epoxy it. Seems like the right way to go.
My table has 2 posts, conforming to the pictures Mike (Joliba) posted.
It does take up a lot of leg room. But I love being able to drop the table and have the extra double berth.
We've watched movies on rainy/foggy days, slept in the saloon when it was hot tin order to get some extra breeze, etc.
The lack of leg room hasn't ever gotten complaints when we've crammed in many drunken sailors for after-sundowners.
 
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driftless

Member II
Blogs Author
Well I said I've been wrong before. Dang, that's twice in one thread - I'll go away for awhile.
You're not wrong. That's just not the way my boat is. I agree that it would seem more secure with bolts and backers. But not easier, and not the way I think it was originally installed.
 
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