A solution for securing spreader boots

Frank Langer

1984 Ericson 30+, Nanaimo, BC
Hi,
I have tried various ways of securing the rubber boots on the end of my spreaders--amalgamating tape, electrical tape, thin rope, but it all came off in a breeze. But I finally found a solution that has worked for me for a couple years: black zip ties, like those used to keep electrical wires in place. These zip ties are available at most hardware stores and come in white and black. The white degrade in UV quite quickly, but the black ones withstand UV very well.
I think it's a good idea to check and lubricate the mast head and spreaders at least once a year, but at least the zip ties hold the spreader boots in place for that long. I really appreciate that I don't have strands of tape hanging off the spreaders anymore. ☺

Frank
Ps. The title should have read securing, not servitude. Damn autocorrect. ��
 
Last edited by a moderator:

bgary

Advanced Beginner
Blogs Author
Good tip.

I did mine with wire ties (white), but then covered them with self-amalgamating tape.

They've held up pretty well, at least between more-or-less annual check and re-wrap cycles.

Bruce
 

oldfauser

Member III
after three years of service, i had to use a box cutter to remove ours that were held on with 3m white plastic tape...

i do like the zip tie idea though :egrin:
 

tenders

Innocent Bystander
Black ties will last a few years but they eventually get brittle and fall off. My solution has been a few loops of seizing wire, with the twisted end of the wire tucked into the opening of the boot so it won't snag on anything.
 

nquigley

Member III
Black ties will last a few years but they eventually get brittle and fall off. My solution has been a few loops of seizing wire, with the twisted end of the wire tucked into the opening of the boot so it won't snag on anything.
My spreader ends are naked - just the wire (twisted ends are tucked under so sails can't get to them). I redid all of them this spring. I really don't see what benefit boots and/or tape offer.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
I think the idea is that sometimes when close hauled, and always when tacking a big genoa, the sail hits the spreader and chafe can occur.
 

toddster

Curator of Broken Parts
Blogs Author
I bought a set of spreader boots years ago and never installed them - I couldn't ever see the genoa contacting the spreader. But indeed, last fall there was some chafe to the UV cover at that point, so on they went. FWIW, I used zip ties and covered them with self-amalgamating tape.

(BTW: This year, I have a new radome - mounted on the same old bracket - and it is catching the genoa on tacks, while the old one never did. Not exactly sure why or how to mitigate. The new one is 2 inches wider in diameter.)
 
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