• Untitled Document

    Fund Raising Season 2020-2021 is Now Open!

    Please visit our thread below to learn more about what you can do to support this website! Thanks so very much for your support of Ericson Yachts.org!

    Notice on 2020-2021 Fund Raising

accurate scale drawing E35-2

steven

Member III
anyone perchance have a accurate scale drawing, especially plan view, of an E35-2 ?
Or (better) offsets at deck level from the centerline.

I'm designing a winter cover.

--Steve
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
anyone perchance have a accurate scale drawing, especially plan view, of an E35-2 ?
Or (better) offsets at deck level from the centerline.

I'm designing a winter cover.

--Steve
For our cover, we used electrical conduit and simply bent the pipe at the same height coming up from the deck. We have a centerline piece they all attach to with brackets you can buy. The lengths of the top portion of pipes were cut to meet the centerline poll.

We remove the lifeline stanchions and set the pipe bows into the sockets. In between pipes have rubber caps on them so as not to scrape or scratch the deck.

We shrink wrap instead of having a regular cover ...and (if careful on removing it) can usually get a couple seasons out of one cover.

EC3716E7-E8FB-4EA1-9AF2-96F49AF1CFB8.jpeg
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Allow a Latitude 34 owner to ask, for his information, why exactly you fellows wrap your boats in winter, given all the work and expense.

Here, boats are in the water 12 months, fully exposed except for the usual canvas covers, and they suffer no particular harm despite our stronger UV and the chafe on lines and barnacle issues. Snow and ice don't really hurt a boat, and fluids components have to be winterized anyhow, yet there seems to be a latitude above which hauling and covers are important.

Obviously I'm missing something. Perhaps the answer lies in the slip environment in wintry climes?
 

1911tex

Sustaining Member
I ask the same question. If the answer is to have work done on the hard over the uncomfortable winter...why make it inconvenient with all the wrap/cover? If the boat is on fresh water, maybe gets iced up? But it thaws out. Maybe to save slip fees over the winter months...but you lose your slip? I guess a simple answer from deep down south, I just never experienced a hard long winter!
 

mbp

Ericson 34
My wife is from Wisconsin, and I’ve visited the in-laws in winter. To get an idea why all boats and docks come out of the water in winter, look up images for “lake Michigan ice”.
 

clayton

Member III
Wrapiping/covering the boat for the winter is a preventive measure- water migrating into deck core through leaky fittings, cracks, hardware attachments, etc. and then multiple freeze thaw cycles is not kind to deck laminate structure. It's also a pain in the butt to go to the yard and shovel off snow/ice after every snowstorm. Having a cockpit full with frozen drains is no fun. I am truly envious of all you warm locales.
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
Allow a Latitude 34 owner to ask, for his information, why exactly you fellows wrap your boats in winter, given all the work and expense.

Here, boats are in the water 12 months, fully exposed except for the usual canvas covers, and they suffer no particular harm despite our stronger UV and the chafe on lines and barnacle issues. Snow and ice don't really hurt a boat, and fluids components have to be winterized anyhow, yet there seems to be a latitude above which hauling and covers are important.

Obviously I'm missing something. Perhaps the answer lies in the slip environment in wintry climes?


Hi Christian...

LOTS of reasons ...starting with the issues of ice. Even though we “bubble” our docks, it’s difficult to insure ice won’t damage the boat hulls in the occasional sub-zero January/February temps.

Also, here on Lake Erie we actually are subject to tidal height variations. Not created by lunar forces but by prevailing strong West & Northwest Winds. Lake levels in the fall can drop by a couple of feet in a very short time. (Not such a concern in the summer months.) The winter waters will go too but the ice remains suspended. At our club, no one has left their boat in that I know of in the 30 years I’ve been a member.

Most of us choose to cover our boats but some do not. The preference for covering is to keep water from rain or melting snow out of the drains (or deck leaks) so as with the next round of freezing temps not to damage anything as the ice expands with its freezing process.

The cover also makes it nice for us to get up onboard to work on “winter” projects in more comfortable conditions.

Covering is definitely a PIA to do along with pulling our mast (Some store mast up) ...but it’s a great opportunity to inspect the rig annually and know it’s in righteous condition.

Hope this sheds a little light on the why of this heathen boating ritual of self inflicted pain.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
I like our climate being envied, but it calls to mind the story of the Vermont farmer who, during Reconstruction, was offered 100 acres of land in Mississippi, free of charge. All he had to do was work it.

"Sir, in Mississippi you can farm all the year round!"

Farmer tossed another log on the fire, filled his pipe, and said: "How stupid do you think I am?"
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
I like our climate being envied, but it calls to mind the story of the Vermont farmer who, during Reconstruction, was offered 100 acres of land in Mississippi, free of charge. All he had to do was work it.

"Sir, in Mississippi you can farm all the year round!"

Farmer tossed another log on the fire, filled his pipe, and said: "How stupid do you think I am?"
I like our climate being envied, but it calls to mind the story of the Vermont farmer who, during Reconstruction, was offered 100 acres of land in Mississippi, free of charge. All he had to do was work it.

"Sir, in Mississippi you can farm all the year round!"

Farmer tossed another log on the fire, filled his pipe, and said: "How stupid do you think I am?"


....”Ahhhh, Yep!” as they up there! ;-))))
 

steven

Member III
I weather alternate winters in the slip and on land.
This year I'm in the water.

Problem is that the E35-2 (and maybe some others) has cockpit scuppers that drain below the water line.
For sub-freezing winter, pipes have to be anti-freezed and closed at both ends.
But that turns the cockpits into frozen bathtubs.

Year before last I did without covers and used temp bilge pumps with floats in the cockpits.
Worked, but just barely (ice fowls the float switch).
So this year I'm back to tarps to keep water out of the cockpit.

But tarps are ugly (and don't really fit well; and can shake apart in the winter gales).
So planning to have simple canvas/vinyl covers made.

--Steve
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Come to think of it I do remember a winter in Annapolis when my cockpit drains iced up, cockpit rainwater rose higher than the bridge deck and flowed into the cabin, and I had a foot of ice in the bilge until Spring.
 

steven

Member III
. . . and my shore power connection is only a couple of inches off the deck.
I really don't want to see that in a block of ice.
 

Filkee

Member III
A cover was my first purchase when I adopted Aylwin. I operated on the old barn theory of if you want to save the building, fix the roof first.
 
Top