Bowsprit Anyone??

p.gazibara

Member III
Hey all,
I just got a second hand asym and the associated top down furler gear. Since Cinderella came with 4 symmetrical kites, we have never flown an asym..

I’m very excited at the prospect of a roller furled light sail for double handed cruising.

Our bow is so narrow, and our anchor is so trustworthy that I’m not sure how a sprit would fit.

Id love any ideas on where to look for good ones. I have never not used a spin pole before this is new to me.

cheers,
-P
 

bgary

Advanced Beginner
Blogs Author
Hey, Pajo!

I put a SS bail on the end of my anchor-roller, and installed a block there for a tack-line. It is secured with a "fast-pin", doesn't get in the way of my anchor when stowed, and can be removed in an instant when it is time to anchor. It generally gets the tack of the asym "just enough" in front of the headstay to make it work.

Might be worth a try before you put a lot of time or money into installing a bowsprit...

IMG_2147sc.jpg
 

p.gazibara

Member III
That looks like the best low budget solution I have seen. I wish my anchor roller came out that far. The shop I’m working at gave me a nice piece of carbon tube, maybe I’ll make something from that...
 

bgary

Advanced Beginner
Blogs Author
...gave me a nice piece of carbon tube.
I've thought about playing with a section of carbon tube. If I were to do it, I'd want a tube that fit into the anchor roller for side-to-side support. I'd glue or fasten a nice thick piece of G10 plate to the aft end of the tube so that it sits on the deck athwartships just in front of the anchor-locker, to spread out the downward load on the aft end of the tube. And then pin (or, more likely, lash with spectra cord) the tube into the forward end of the anchor roller to handle the upward loads.

Haven't done any calcs to figure out what the loads would be (it's fairly low on my project list at this point). The load at the tip will be upward, but there's a significant compression force wanting to push the tube aft that I haven't figured out how to address without drilling holes in the boat. plus obviously side loads if not running DDW. And the "interesting" bit to figure out is that a simple tube-sprit like this is a lever with the fulcrum at/near the mid-point, so the upward load at the forward end generates a proportionate downward force at the aft end.

Given that (at this point) my asym is used for casual running in light air, my current setup works for me. If I wanted to make it work for a broader range of conditions, I'd take a long look at how the E34 here on the forums (I think it is a chicago boat) has set up a removable sprit. I'll see if I can dig up a link.

$.02 (not sure how much that is worth in NZ$)
Bruce
 
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gadangit

Member III
I’m very excited at the prospect of a roller furled light sail for double handed cruising.

cheers,
-P
I've not seen a top down furler in the wild here locally. Two name brand sailmakers locally both discourage, for now, these furlers and recommend a sock. According to them it takes a ton of continuous effort to get the darn sail rolled up.

Our code 0 is on a furler and we opted for the "clicker" which allows you to stop and catch your breath without losing your hard earned furling gains.

One other thought is the furler will work best (most efficiently) with a hard shackle connection which doesn't spin. This really precludes the use of a tack line setup like pictured above. Adjusting the tack is a pretty useful tool when trimming an assym.

Good luck with the bowsprit, I love a good project like that!

Chris
 

bgary

Advanced Beginner
Blogs Author
I've not seen a top down furler in the wild here locally.
Same here, other than on dedicated race boats.

For this discussion, it's probably worth noting that a top-down furler requires a fair amount of tension on the luff, and that load would probably require a more "engineered" bowsprit (e.g., thru-mounted strut with compression tubes, bobstay, etc).

$.02
 
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