Chesapeake Ericson club

GrandpaSteve

Sustaining Member
Sorry I had to drop off. I kept loosing the connection, and then I had to tack. FYI, I am not a reliable club member, I am happy to be considered a member, but I did not actually join because I have a lot of work commitments and etc. and so on. Nice to hear some of your voices.
 

mjsouleman

Member III
Moderator
OK, back from my first sail/motor of the season. This was a good meeting, thank you Stuart for the hosting the session.

I am going to get the latest update to the member list and send out an email this evening.

Mark
 

Tin Kicker

Sustaining Member
Moderator
Not sure which of you asked for pix of the kayak restoration birthday present but here you go. It's a 1982 'glass Phoenix that I got for $100 with 3 poorly repaired (1 still leaking) holes in the bottom. The idea was to make this light little river boat into a semi cruiser with more speed than my partners' plastic 12' Perception Tribute. At her 5'2" the Tribby is still a great ladies boat and zero regrets in owning it, she just wanted to have a more efficient boat for keeping up.

As bought. You could easily cut yourself on the really rough glass seam between the upper and lower halves:

Forward half and one of the repairs to be re-done:

Close up of original nose repair:

Other two repairs re-done:

Shaving the fuzz from the rough bottom:

Start to adding new keel, as the original Phoenix had little directional stability:

The green is TotalBoat TotalFair and the gray is what was left after sanding the first coat of primer. Tried to leave on as little of the extra weight as possible.

The original cockpit seat had worn through the bottom of the boat! The bottom of the seat is at the top and the concentric rings in the center of the photo are the worn away layers of glass which had to be patched. The cracked material was the 38 year old foam knee bolsters. Note the drilled out rivets that held the old seat pan. The "after" photo shows the new glassed in structure next to the new seat bottom which pick up the loads of pushing down on the coaming to get in and out.

Almost same view of the rebuilt cockpit with the purple gel seat bottom and velcro adjustable setback re-purposed from the dome top of a kitty litter box. The velcro didn't hold up so plastic bolts are going in. I thought the bungee to park the paddle was cool till she said I was an engineer solving a non-problem. ;) btw - the 3/8" hole in the white knee bolster is for a padlock.

New bottom, showing the new keel:

Front and rear grab handles with screw eyes for locking, garage lifts, and transport tie-downs. The fairing material, primer, and paints were from TotalBoat and the finish came out great with just a roller and a little thinning to do 3 coats. The exterior colors are TB WetEdge and the cockpit is bilge paint. Last time I checked the finished boat without the gel seat it was something like 34 lbs.

Best of all she seems to like it and now out-glides my 16'9" boat when we stop paddling which never happened with her plastic boat. YAY!
My biggest surprise was when she said the stability was very similar to her Tribby, as I thought this would be less roll stable. She also is not sure if she is going to stay with the gel seat or use the little air pads she's used to.

Now back to the Ericson, houses, and other projects.
 

Navman

Member III
Stuart, Thanks for setting up the meeting. It worked out really well. After the meeting I went for a solo "day sail". The winds were perfect the autopilot was working well. I was having such a good time I just kept sailing. I covered 54 nm. and arrived back at the marina at exactly midnight. I picked up my ball, made dinner and proceeded to crash. What a great day. I'm looking forward to hooking up with Mark next weekend on his trip north.
 

Navman

Member III
Nice job on the kayak Bob. I worked for a guy who sold and rented kayaks in the 70's. He would by the 2 piece units and we would assemble them and paint them to order. Looks exactly like the ones he had. _/)
 

Navman

Member III
No, I have a Si-Tex ST-80 linear drive unit. The ram/ motor is an Octopus linear drive. Very strong ram. I think I read that it has a 750 lb push/ pull capacity. Amperage draw is also low using approx. 2 amps with normal driving. Two different manufacturers who commonly have their units mated and are sold as combination packages. Sounds kinda kinky doesn't it?
 

Tin Kicker

Sustaining Member
Moderator
As long as they are well attached and assuming you meant physical load as opposed to electrical, I'd be more concerned about the wire routing and connections.
 

Navman

Member III
You might want to do some research on the flex panels. Practical Sailor has done some testing and reviews. The life expectancy is very short, 5-8 years and the price is very high compared to ridgid. Added to the cost is the cost for a canvas person to sew in the tabs and velcro for mounting. I am just finishing up my solar frame which I made so I can mount 2, ridgid 200 watt panels with a 21% efficiency or another model which has 17%.. The frame S.S tubing materials and connectors were bought at McMaster Carr @ about $325.00 the panels are 185 each. My time involved is gratis. I did the measurement for the final two vertical supports on last Saturday before the Zoom meeting. If we meet up this weekend I will show it to you as I hope to install the frame Saturday.
 

Tin Kicker

Sustaining Member
Moderator
It all depends on what you are trying to do. I installed a flexible panel because a 50W panel is very inexpensive, fit the spray hood perfectly, and is more than what is needed for the near future.
 

mjsouleman

Member III
Moderator
Don/Bob,
I am always interested in collecting information when it comes to making decisions that effect how long I can stay disconnected from the gird for three weeks or more.

I look forward to visiting the two of you in the coming weeks.

Mark
 

Navman

Member III
Try viewing the facebook page. “Solar on a Boat” loads of info and very very helpful people with a great knowledge base of all things solar on a boat. You ask a question and you get good answers.
 

Tin Kicker

Sustaining Member
Moderator
Almost anything from Will Prowse is really good (https://diysolarforum.com/members/will-prowse.1/) and there are a ton of other good resources online.

But it always starts with estimating a solar budget which means figuring out what you will have consuming power and for how long. We don't have electric galleys or AC and can switch most of the lights to LED, so we don't need lots of watts. Below are some fairly conservative numbers from my notes and what is below that is copied from my own numbers so you can use them as a place to start:

3W LED nav light bulb replacements (worst case each)
4.8W Marine Beam mast head and steaming light (2W for just steaming without deck light)
1.5W LED Interior bulb replacements
18W iPadPro11 (mine),30W MacBook, 87W MacBookPro, 85-150W Full MiniMac
.55A/6.6W standby mode for Standard Horizon GX6000 radio. Receive (max) .9A/10.8W, Xmit 5A/60W, Hailer 2.1A/25W
12W B&G Vulcan 7 chart plotter

Anchoring at night and using lights for 4 hours/night, I'd need about 386 Wh/day or 386/12= 32A:
(Anchor light 11 hours times 2W = 22 Wh) + (4 hours times 3 interior lights = 13.5 Wh) + (4 hr iPad = 72Wh) = (24 hours of radio X 6.6W = 158Wh) + (10 hours chart plotter X 12W = 120 Wh)

I currently have two 100 Ah lead acid batteries and don't want to discharge more than 50% so this can go without sun or charging for 3 full days. There likely will not be enough left to start the motor but the batteries won't be damaged in the worst case. For a normal weekend with some use of the motor (50A alternator times number of hours of use) and existing 50W solar it would be fine.


We are far enough north and cloudy often enough that my solar notes show that per day we should collect at least three times the watt hours a panel is rated at, so would average 150W with my existing panel. Obviously, hard will collect more than flexible, sunny summer days will be more than cloudy or in the winter, etc, but this is a place to start an estimate from. If I'm using the boat for weekends, the 50W panel is enough to recharge the batteries during the days not in use, especially if the motor is used to get to and from the dock.

If I wanted to stay out I would need to turn off the radio and chart plotter when possible &/or put another 100W panel out. I have two 175W hard panels in the shed (350W total) for when I go on a longer cruise and plan to just hang one or both from the life lines.

Last note is about buying stuff: There are all sorts of kits and places happy to take your money, but you can save a LOT by Googling reviews for what is available and comparison reviews. My system has:

$69.99 Richsolar 50W 12V ETFE flexible solar panel. It's cheap enough to replace every few years.
$47.95 HQST 20A MPPT controller. This is big enough to connect one of the big panels I have but not both. I only need one.
$12.53 Two bulkhead glands to run the wire through the cabin roof. Only used one.
$9.98 For 5 pair of RENOGY solar connectors
$5.36 Solar connector tool for assy & disassembly
$15.95 Solar connector pin crimping tool
$161.76 Total

Rather than buy cable, I made my own using Anchor Wire tinned marine grade 12/2 AWG Duplex. This is a much less expensive and better tailored approach. When I go to use the 175W panels I have the solar connectors and always have wire on hand so will be able to do the install very quickly.

LOTS of industrial velcro:

Panel installed with the bulkhead in the lower left before cleaning up the exposed wiring shows the RENOGY solar connectors:

Using coat wire to pull the cable behind the trim so it won't show:

Mounted the MPPT, breaker, and a directional switch to each of the batteries on a piece of aluminum:
 

gc_sailor

Rule of Thumb, Electric E34-2
I just mounted 3 Sunpower 110w flexible panels ($190/5lbs each) on my Bimini. Still testing so they are mounted on Plaskolite and tied to my Bimini frame, ok to 18 knots so far. I have them in series so I can charge my 48v motor bank. The 3 produce too much for my house bank and too little for my motor bank. Adding a 4th panel this week as I am charging my house from my motor bank dc-dc. Will be about 90v and 4amps which should send 54v and 8amps to the motor bank through the Victron MPPT. Got over 1300 watts a day from the 3 panels. Brand new to solar but wanted to minimize the use of my generator due to the noise.
 

Tin Kicker

Sustaining Member
Moderator
Good move on using Plaskolite, as the corrugated nature will give an insulation layer between the panels and fabric. I used it as a bed beneath the fuel tank to keep it from chafing on the rough interior of the hull.
 

mjsouleman

Member III
Moderator
Wow, you guys are so far above me, my head is spinning. That is a lot to digest in one sitting but such great information, thank you Bob
 
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