Christian Williams' Hawaii Video 2021

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
This one is 90 minutes long, so pretty hard to watch on a cell phone while standing in a take-out line. Best streamed to a TV screen using the YouTube app. Of subjects often discussed on the forum, it covers the complications of the Cape Horn gear, the threat posed by the inaccessible anchor locker drain, the issue of line buildup in a roller furler drum, the suitability of carbon fiber for whisker poles, and the testing of the Ericson hull form and sail plans in "storm trade winds," which on this voyage often blew above 30 knots for days, and of gale-force wind on the return voyage.

Overall a more rigorous voyage than in the past, but the boat came through well.


Here's a preview:

 

goldenstate

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
I'm glad you gave yourself permission to make a longer video.

The Lebowski-esque "Isn't that just an opinion?" is a classic.

Many subtle charms throughout.

Funny, educational, and inspiring. My 77-year-old father recently made a very similar observation of the persistence of one's being: "I feel the same way I felt when I was 22. There's no change. We are simply always who we are."

Great work and congratulations on completing a third lap to Hawaii.

Cheers,

Tom
 

Sean Engle

Your Friendly Administrator
Administrator
Founder
We just watched it tonight - excellent. I was surprised at the breakdowns in your steering system though and was wondering how much variation you can employ on shackle sizes, etc.? I mean, that system seems to take a lot of beating on a run like that...can you beef them up or would that not be workable?

//sse
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
The Cape Horn integral system is just too complicated when installed on an E38. It works fine now but a high price to pay for elegance.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
The Cape Horn integral system is just too complicated when installed on an E38. It works fine now but a high price to pay for elegance.
I had kind of wondered about that, from observing your installation details. I do like the relative simplicity of your prior SailOMat vane, and must confess that the "jungle gym" of tubing on the Monitor bugs me (even tho the only multi day delivery I have done did use that brand and it worked fine) .
Thanks again for posting up your experiences!
 

Willboy22

New Member
New Ericson owner here... I learn something (or several things) every time I watch one of your videos! Appreciate you sharing - and your sense of humor!
 

Sean Engle

Your Friendly Administrator
Administrator
Founder
The Cape Horn integral system is just too complicated when installed on an E38. It works fine now but a high price to pay for elegance.
Huh, that's interesting. I guess it all goes back to application-application-application... What the system is, what's its capacity is and how it's deployed and employed... I'm looking at wall assemblies and HVAC systems right now for a new house and see lots of application in this lesson... =)

//sse
 

bigd14

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
Excellent video! I especially enjoyed your ruminations on aging. Thank you for sharing your journey.
 

Rick R.

Contributing Partner
Another great adventure. Thank you for sharing.

I imagine the installation of the vane was complicated seeing your view in the locker.

Question, when you covered up the drain hole in the bow, where did the water go that accumulated in the anchor locker go…into the bildge?
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
I also sealed the drain in the chain locker. Under the most splashy conditions, it turns out, the chain locker is never more than half full, because water is thrust out by the motion of the bow. Given that the locker is half full of chain and line, the actual max water in there is probably no more than 5 gallons. Under anything approaching normal sailing conditions, no water enters the locker, since our boats are quite dry and the bow doesn't bury.

So, overall, the drain is for rain. In gale conditions I pumped mine out with a hand pump a few times, and then just shrugged. Having some water in there has no ill effect at all.

I have now completed the R&R of the locker and replaced the rotted-out copper stem tube with stainless and a new hose, and rebedded the locker pan with Life-Calk. Not that big a job even to do alone, although awkward.
 

Bepi

E27
Based on the early minor bilge pump usage do you think the drain was broken before, or soon after you departed MDR, only becoming apparent in high seas encountered on the return attempt?
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
I have a hunch the problem existed all along, but was not significant until windward work in heavy conditions.

The bilge pump would run for a few minutes a day on the outbound voyage, cause unknown. But most of that was running, when the drain hole in the stem is seldom submerged.

To windward, this issue would sink the boat if not identified. But the offshore fix would be easy enough--just stuck something into the hole in the stem. But you can't reach the hole from the deck, so it would mean using the dinghy or maybe lowering on a bosun's chair from a halyard. Easier for me to head back and do it right. But not absolutely necessary. And the decision was easier because of the wild immediate conditions.
 

Joliba

1988 E38-200 Contributing Member
Christian,
I watched your video this evening. It inspired me to resume work on some (non-sailing) videos I started to edit but have recently languished incomplete in my computer.
Your video also brought me right back to some Pacific passages in my past. The constant motion, the stranded flying fish, the visiting shore bird, the pelagic bird flirting with the impossible masthead perch, the errant spherical fishing float, the squalls, rainbows, and sunsets were all common threads captured in your video.
Though only 67, I too look at the world through the same eyes as I did at 18 and can’t escape my lifelong loves and dreams.
(Just curious—Have you gotten to my book yet?)
Mike
 
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