Cockpit Table

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Cockpit Table success story:
I thought others might want to view the really *cool* Ericson-built table that I recently bought from another EY.org site member. The top and fiddle joinery is identical to the construction of our dining table, so I assume that this circa-1990 table came from the same guys in the same Ericson cabinet shop as our '88 boat interior parts.

What is really neat is the way the top is supported in the "up" position without an angled brace underneath, and also uses the same hinged pieces of teak to lock it securely in the stowed positon! Nothing to hit your knees on underneath when the table is horizontal.
:cool:

Since my YS pedistal guard is 3 inches wider than the Edson guard this table was sized for, I had to improvise with some ss clamps to hold it to the guard. I may re-engineer this during the winter...
The original attachment was a pair of ss U-bolts, but there was not room to do this on our width guard.
Oh Well. ;)

I tried to take some pictures of it up with the "locking pieces" in place, with the locks swung out and ready to lower, and with it "locked down."

And, yes I will be painting that new FRP holder for the Garmin; red-tinted epoxy IS rather obnoxious, isn't it?
:p

Loren
Olson 34 #8

ps: this is such a nice-looking design that I wonder if/when some woodworker in this group will start building and selling them.
 

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sleather

Sustaining Member
Nice Piece!

Someone spent some time pondering that connection! Hmmmm

It definetly doesn't predate the "cupholder"LOL
 

Mindscape

Member III
Nice Table!

That's a really great looking table and a cool design. If anyone starts building them let me know:) Probably way beyond my wood working skills!.

Great find Loren!
 

Blue Chip

Member III
Another one!!

Well, that answers one question. Our 1990 32-200 has this table, and we have never seen another one, nor has any other boat owner we have had come visit. I was wondering if it were one of a kind. This is the greatest gadgets since glazed doughnuts.
It's a litttle tricky for your canvas guy to build a cover for the whole assembly ((we have a leather covered wheel and cover it) but once it''s all measured properly, it works like a champ. Highly recommend this.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
It's a litttle tricky for your canvas guy to build a cover for the whole assembly ((we have a leather covered wheel and cover it) but once it''s all measured properly, it works like a champ. Highly recommend this.

On the canvas situation, we are way overdue for a new cover for the wheel and guard anyway. The old cover is badly worn and now does not fit over the table and higher guard / bigger wheel, etc.
A local canvas sewer is about to start on it, matter of fact.

Now you have me wondering about the "tricky" part! Perhaps you could post up a picture of yours?

Thanks,
Loren
:rolleyes:
 
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Blue Chip

Member III
tricky shape

With the "shoulders" provided by the instrument panel and wheel, and the "head" provided by the grab bar, we end up with a somewhat stubby kite shape as the bottom tapers a bit. If you can picture it. The process is achieved by putting a "dart" in the top of the thing with the point being toward the bow. I'm going to the boat in a few days and I'll see what I can do about pictures. Anyone in the Alameda area that wouild like a look, feel free. We are in grand Marina.
 

Stuart

Member II
legless

Hi Loren

Nice table, I have been wondering how to loose the leg on ours, now I know. Next winters project. I might even add a fold down counter in the galley at the same time. Thanks for posting.
Cheers
Stuart
SV Fairhaven
Comox BC
 

hodo

Member III
Cockpit table in progress

I liked the table, showed pics to my son who is a shipwright, and therefore a wood worker, and he said "cool when do I start it?". I am giving him the measurements off of Mischief Maker, an E 38, this weekend, and he will get started hopefully next week. I told him I wanted solid teak, not plywood, he said its about 22-25 bucks a board foot. He works for a wood supplier so he can choose a good grain. If anybody is interested in one for their boat, let me know. He will have the bugs worked out doing mine.
Now I need to go down and check the boat and see how she faired in the 50+ knots of wind we are having.
Harold & Jessie, S/V Mischief :devil: Maker
 

Martin King

Sustaining Member
Loren,

What does this do?

 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
When you raise the table up to the eatin' position, you fold/bring that hinged L-shape piece forward so the the two pieces of "velcro" engage. Along with it being a tight fit, the "velcro" helps ensure that the teak "L" will stay in place and thereby hold the table top in place.

Loren
 
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Martin King

Sustaining Member
That's velcro? Wow, it sure doesn't look like it from the photo. Or maybe
my eyes are really starting to go... What if you used a rare earth magnet
instead?
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
That's velcro? Wow, it sure doesn't look like it from the photo. Or maybe
my eyes are really starting to go... What if you used a rare earth magnet
instead?

On the plus side, you would never have to adjust the ship's compass again... (or pay any attention to it at all)
:esad:
 

tenders

Innocent Bystander
That looks like Velcro made from little plastic pointy protuberances rather than from hook and loop fabric.

I suspect the plastic is more UV- and weather-resistant, and perhaps more amenable to being screwed into place rather than glued.

(My cars' EZ-Pass toll devices attach to the windshields with similar stuff. The adhesive fails regularly every 2 years, but replacing it beats screwing the thing to the windshield.)
 
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Emerald

Moderator
The port berth in the main cabin on the Independence 31 is configured so your feet stick into the hanging locker. The cushion that separates the berth from the locker when your feet aren't sticking through the hole has what appears to be this same "velcro", and it is indeed a very coarse plastic pointy thing. Quite tenacious in its grip. Often wondered where Ericson got it from. Emerald was built in '79, so it would appear to have been used for a few years on different boats. Wish I had the table instead of the cushion :egrin:
 

Martin King

Sustaining Member
I always thought velcro was hook and loop fabric. Never seen
the pointy plastic stuff before. Wonder if anybody here knows what
it's called and where to get it. 3M makes these dual lock fastener buttons
with hook and loop that look similar.
 
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Emerald

Moderator
I always thought velcro was hook and loop fabric. Never seen
the pointy plastic stuff before. Wonder if anybody here knows what
it's called and where to get it.

I think "velcro" is hook and loop specifically, and this stuff is really two sets of points that interlock, but can be placed randomly together like velcro. It may be tissue, but it ain't Kleenex
:cool:
 

Blue Chip

Member III
Still Looking

Loren,

What does this do?


It's a 3-M product and is a "mushroom" type fastener. It apparently was (is) a hard rubber thing that over time has turned (UV) into a hard as a rock plastic thing that just doesn't work anymore. The "mushroom heads" are so hard they don't interact. I can't find them this sylel anywhere. I can find ROUND ones...but these are round on a permament backing you see in the picture.
I'd love to talk to a live body at 3-M. Anyb idea how to do that?
 

Lucky Dog

Member III
Heres what I found from 3M and from Master Carr

ml
 

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