Crack forward of the anchor locker

Equanimity

Member II
Hi Forum,

I recently took a look at a local ericson and discovered a large crack on the deck, just aft of the anchor mount and forward of the anchor locker. Not sure if it’s a stress crack or something caused by a collision. Would love your insight if you’ve seen anything like this.

99E19177-BA20-4BBE-B7C9-AB2EC14B904F.jpg

Additionally, I discovered a slight split in the teak siding, in the forward cabin (V-berth):

9B8EC2DF-0BC7-4482-9B9C-4D8A3EC78898.jpg

Not sure if there is a connection between the two points of damage. Owner didn’t say. Would greatly appreciate your impressions! Thanks so much!

-EQN
 

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Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Good Question, and Hard to Answer

Does the inside of the stem show stress or repairs? I suspect a collision with something hard, at a pretty good combined speed. Could be years in the past.
It's really hard to flex the boat enough to split that piece of teak ceiling, so maybe that was just a flawed piece of wood that took decades to dry enough to split.
Photos help a lot, but it's still difficult to diagnose at a distance.
I would focus first on the outside of the stem. OTOH, a really *good* gel coat repair will be invisible....

Plan B: remove (and re-bed) that "tub". That might be the only way to really study the inside part. That's not a fun job; I have seen it done on another E boat. Moderate swearing was involved.

Edit: is the anchor locker lid a different color than the deck? Why? And why is a pin backing out of one of the hinges?
 
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gabriel

Member III
to me it looks like an anchoring mishap if anything.

how does the shape of the bow look from the outside? maybe take a straight edge to everything that should be straight and check it, don't trust your eye. if you can, go to the bow and put some downward pressure, see if there is any movement.
 
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nquigley

Member III
I've seen something similar, but not quite so extensive, caused by large wake coming into a marina, causing the bow to rise up very high and for the boat to lurch forward in the slip, and then to have the bow roller fitting crash down on the dock. I suggest checking the entire stemhead fitting for cracks (or evidence of repairs).
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
I would investigate further.

There is evidence of water incursion on the forward starboard shelf and above. Is that related to the cracks?

As regards the photo evidence, note that it is possible to overstress a bow by trying to raise a stuck anchor. The roller assembly makes a lever. The boat is cinched up tight on the stuck anchor. Swell is then used to break the anchor free. This can put big lift vector on the anchor roller assembly, which is bolted to the deck.

Take a look at the anchor roller assembly for signs of deformation.

We know this (I think): that's not a simple gelcoat crack. (If a probe will pass through the crack)

But it may not be important, only a cosmetic repair. A surveyor would know.
 
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Equanimity

Member II
These theories are really helping me get a sense of potential problems this vessel may have faced. Much appreciated!

I noticed another potential clue on this image of the underside of the bow. Don’t think that’s a line of water dripping from the starboard edge. Thoughts?
7E8A3E49-096C-4805-AA6D-55828AB75543.jpg
 

Kenneth K

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author

nquigley

Member III
I'd really want to know the source of those cracks from the broker, or the PO - when and how? repairs made?, etc.

Since the anchor well has a shell liner, you're going to need a surveyor to assess these symptoms just from the outside. But, if you buy the boat, you can temporarily remove the liner to inspect the inner surfaces for cracks and delamination - you'll be able to strengthen/repair those areas pretty easily if needed.

Looks like she has an on-deck (horizontal) windlass - yes? One can see that the heavy cables were run in the headliner in the forepeak (part of the pos (red) cable is peeking out of the open zipper). If it's working, this is a valuable and relatively uncommon add to these boats. I'm in the middle of adding a windlass - aside from the hours of labor, the overall cost will be about twice the cost of just the windlass :cool:
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
The owner needs to to explain the issue.

I believe the headliner in the forward V-berth has been removed for inspection (wrinkles) and the trim piece (screws visible in photo; they were originally plugged like the other fastenings).

Feel free to press the broker for an explanation from the seller. The broker needs a complainant--you--before he can ask (it's not his job to investigate issues). He'll be glad you asked because this will come up every time he shows the boat.

xxx 9B8EC2DF-0BC7-4482-9B9C-4D8A3EC78898.jpg
 
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Equanimity

Member II
Very interesting assessment, fellas. Unfortunately, this is a broker-less boat. It is being sold directly from the owner via a private listing.

This this is enough of a reason to walk away from the boat offering? I browsed through a few threads on this forum and one gentleman posted about his time repairing the anchor locker. Seemed like quite the ordeal and he lost some valuable space in his v-berth.

Here is a head on view of v-berth:
3CC69B6F-E65D-46E7-899E-0CE586114196.jpg

Closer look at anchor locker:
364A7E84-E524-4F41-9940-730E48ED0921.jpg
 
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nquigley

Member III
what Ericson model is she?
How's her overall condition? - maybe this is the only area of concern?
Windlass working?
Wanna share the listing?
btw, the high tide line in the anchor locker is probably just that - there's a rather small-diameter drain hole in the bottom of the anchor locker that exits at the bow, just a few inches above the waterline - could have got blocked in the past and left with water in it for a long time.
 

Equanimity

Member II
The model is an E38, the overall condition is okay... It has several other areas of concern, many of which are cosmetic. Owner claims that she's sea-worthy. Haven't given her a proper survey yet - that would happen next if I felt it was worth doing. All of the rigging looks solid. The engine's support legs are rusting out from underneath itself. Apparently it runs, but should probably be replaced.

My plan is to research some more, put some more questions together, then hire a surveyor if deemed appropriate.
 

gabriel

Member III
walk away? what's the most you would spend on this boat taking into account that the bow tip is completely cracked and it needs complete repair? take that number and lower it by 1/4 then make your offer based off that. if the guy rejects it, you avoided a pain in the ass. if he takes it, you still bought a pain in the ass but at least you got a deal on it!

i will admit that i don't like the location though, it's critical and hard to get purchase with clamps in order to make a good repair. i do believe it is possible to repair it good as new though.
 

Kenneth K

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
The engine's support legs are rusting out from underneath itself. Apparently it runs, but should probably be replaced.
That's a pretty big deal. Many find, when replacing motor mounts, that significant modifications are required to the wood & glass stringers the existing mounts are lagged into. The lag holes usually get stripped out and there's a lack of material to accommodate new bolts.

All of this renders the boat unusable for an extended time period. It also indicates a fairly low standard of boat maintenance--this could have been prevented with a $8 tub of lanocote. I'd check closely to see if this attitude carried over to othe parts of the boat.
 

Tin Kicker

Member III
I can see several potential causes for the crack ahead of the anchor locker. The point is not how the crack was created at this point, but how bad and expensive it will be to fix? (Although knowing how it was formed may help come up with the repair.) This is a very high stress area, with the head stay pulling up, snagged anchor pulling down, plus the potential occasional dock bump. Being through the glass plies it will not be easy to fix and it will be an extensive/costly repair by a good fiberglass person.

I've done a fair share of glass and this is beyond something I would take on. My suggestion is to not go further with a purchase till having a really reputable fiberglass shop give you a hard dollar (not to exceed) estimate. This is in addition to a quality survey.
 

GrandpaSteve

Member III
I do not want to sidetrack this thread, but what am I supposed to be doing with an $8 tub of Lanocote? I know I am not doing it, because I do not have any Lanocote.
 

Tin Kicker

Member III
It's just one version of corrosion prevention. The point was that somebody had done insufficient prevention and let a problem grow.
 
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