Crack forward of the anchor locker

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
It's just one version of corrosion prevention. The point was that somebody had done insufficient prevention and let a problem grow.
Polite and refined bunch of "Vikings"...
I thought that someone, considering that the product is used to prevent galling of dissimilar surfaces, would suggest a Risqué use of the 8 # tub !
:devil:
 

debonAir

Member III
Knowing what I know now... I would pass on the boat as well. She looks like she's met with one too many concrete walls in her travels. That said, as people have mentioned, doing fiberglass work isn't really that hard. The crack(s) are probably easily fixable, especially since you can get at both sides without disassembling a lot of furniture. Even if you have to cut out the anchor locker, making a new one and taping it in isn't that big a job. Doing a proper fix will involve removing a lot of existing glass to get the proper tapers and laying in a good deal back. You'll want a pro to do that work as that area is the thickest/highest stressed part of the boat. My guess is 4k to 6k to fix it properly.

If the boat was in really great shape otherwise, and you could take cost to fix out of the asking price and could have a yard do the repairs over the winter, maybe. If the boat is just average, has serious corrosion on the motor mounts and unkown original motor, needing sails, electronics, etc.? Find another project I'd say. Good bones are important and you'll want to use her as you improve her vs. waiting year(s)
 

Kenneth K

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
I do not want to sidetrack this thread, but what am I supposed to be doing with an $8 tub of Lanocote? I know I am not doing it, because I do not have any Lanocote.
I couldn't think of the name of this stuff when I originally posted, but here's a pic.

20190930_190605.jpg Actually, I've never used Lonocote either, but I believe it's similar to this stuff. Lanolin based, goes on with a brush, clear and jelly like. Doesn't evaporate like WD40 or stain like grease. I slather it on motor mounts, shaft couplings, etc. No rust!
 

Pat C.

Member III
Could it be caused from an after market windlass rated higher than the bow structure would allow, then being used over zelously to raise a stuck anchor? The damage appears to be from excessive downforce, enough to even offset the forestay tension. That's a lot of force. Perhaps water length and displacement aren't telling the whole story when choosing a windlass for a boat. Maybe something to think about for those of us who don't have a windlass, but are increasingly wanting one as the years go by...
 

Tin Kicker

Member III
Could it be caused from an after market windlass rated higher than the bow structure would allow, then being used over zelously to raise a stuck anchor? The damage appears to be from excessive downforce, enough to even offset the forestay tension. That's a lot of force. Perhaps water length and displacement aren't telling the whole story when choosing a windlass for a boat. Maybe something to think about for those of us who don't have a windlass, but are increasingly wanting one as the years go by...
There isn't enough detail in the few photos to be totally certain, but the interior photo and directionality of the crack beneath the cleat would fit better with a collision than the windlass theory.
 

nquigley

Member III
- haven't seen a post in this thread for almost a month from Equanimity
- I wonder if he's still even considering this boat.
+1 for Tin Kicker's conclusion the crack is the result of a collision
 
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