E-32 Mk-3 CNG Gas cooker/oven

ToruInoue

New Member
Hi Ericson boat owners,

I got 1987 E-32 Mk-3 sail boat in August 2016. She came with CNG gas cooker/oven. I am totally unfamiliar about the system. I read few articles about re-filling the gas cylinder and it is tough to find out CNG Gas stations, etc.

I am looking for some suggestions like how to take the cylinder out from the boat and is there any connector between the pump and cylinder available which I should use at the CNG gas station.
I live in Greenwich CT and found two CNG gas station nearby. One is in Bridgeport CT and the other is in Rye, New York. I believe they are mainly for commercial vehicles such as Bus and automobiles used by town/state officials.

I appreciate any suggestions for this matter.

Toru Inoue
E-32 Mk-3 - Puffin III
OG Yacht Club, Greenwich CT
 

GrandpaSteve

Sustaining Member
Hi Ericson boat owners,

I got 1987 E-32 Mk-3 sail boat in August 2016. She came with CNG gas cooker/oven. I am totally unfamiliar about the system. I read few articles about re-filling the gas cylinder and it is tough to find out CNG Gas stations, etc.

I am looking for some suggestions like how to take the cylinder out from the boat and is there any connector between the pump and cylinder available which I should use at the CNG gas station.
I live in Greenwich CT and found two CNG gas station nearby. One is in Bridgeport CT and the other is in Rye, New York. I believe they are mainly for commercial vehicles such as Bus and automobiles used by town/state officials.

I appreciate any suggestions for this matter.

Toru Inoue
E-32 Mk-3 - Puffin III
OG Yacht Club, Greenwich CT

I exchange tanks at a local chandelier when empty, however it is my understanding that with a device such as this you can refill yourself:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Boat-CNG-Tank-Refill-Adaptor-/182191546137
 
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Mike Davis

Member I
CNG to propane

Hi Ericson boat owners,

I got 1987 E-32 Mk-3 sail boat in August 2016. She came with CNG gas cooker/oven. I am totally unfamiliar about the system. I read few articles about re-filling the gas cylinder and it is tough to find out CNG Gas stations, etc.

I am looking for some suggestions like how to take the cylinder out from the boat and is there any connector between the pump and cylinder available which I should use at the CNG gas station.
I live in Greenwich CT and found two CNG gas station nearby. One is in Bridgeport CT and the other is in Rye, New York. I believe they are mainly for commercial vehicles such as Bus and automobiles used by town/state officials.

I appreciate any suggestions for this matter.

Toru Inoue
E-32 Mk-3 - Puffin III
OG Yacht Club, Greenwich CT


Hi Toru
If propane is easier for you to get you might get a gas-fitter to change the jets on your stove. Propane has a much higher BTU value and the jets are smaller. My stove came with both sets of jets and I'm using propane.
Mike and Bev on RUCKUS
 

GrandpaSteve

Sustaining Member
Hi Toru
If propane is easier for you to get you might get a gas-fitter to change the jets on your stove. Propane has a much higher BTU value and the jets are smaller. My stove came with both sets of jets and I'm using propane.
Mike and Bev on RUCKUS

If your CNG equipment is in great condition and you are sailing where you can get refills, or fill your tank, you can put the CNG to propane conversion low on your refit list. If you are going to cruise far from your refill source for more than a few weeks you will want to convert to propane as soon as you can. CNG is relatively safe and cooks well enough, but propane is available everywhere.
 
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Alan Gomes

Sustaining Member
I exchange tanks at a local chandelier when empty, however it is my understanding that with a device such as this you can refill yourself:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Boat-CNG-Tank-Refill-Adaptor-/182191546137
I think with a device such as this you could well blow yourself up. Perhaps. I guess it depends on whether you feel lucky.

The pressures involved as well as the potential for defects in your tanks, which may not have current certifications, would sure give me pause, anyway.
 

Alan Gomes

Sustaining Member
Hi Toru
If propane is easier for you to get you might get a gas-fitter to change the jets on your stove. Propane has a much higher BTU value and the jets are smaller. My stove came with both sets of jets and I'm using propane.
Mike and Bev on RUCKUS
Bear in mind that converting the stove will be the least of your expenses if you are to have a safe propane installation. You need a vented locker, proper hose correctly installed, a sniffer, solenoid, etc. etc. It ain't cheap.

If you don't care about the oven then a quick and cheap alternative would be an Origo two-burner alcohol stove. They are very safe, relatively inexpensive, butt-simple and utterly reliable, with none of the associated safety paraphernalia such as solenoids, propane sniffers, etc. They cook well. The cost of fuel is reasonable, though higher than propane. They do make a model with an oven but now you are getting into more serious expense.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Plan B: Origo

Bear in mind that converting the stove will be the least of your expenses if you are to have a safe propane installation. You need a vented locker, proper hose correctly installed, a sniffer, solenoid, etc. etc. It ain't cheap.

If you don't care about the oven then a quick and cheap alternative would be an Origo two-burner alcohol stove. They are very safe, relatively inexpensive, butt-simple and utterly reliable, with none of the associated safety paraphernalia such as solenoids, propane sniffers, etc. They cook well. The cost of fuel is reasonable, though higher than propane. They do make a model with an oven but now you are getting into more serious expense.

I did a full-on install of a safe/approved propane galley on our prior boat. Note that it requires a vented OB gas cylinder locker. What with the remote shutoff and sniffer, I can see why boat builders in the 80's liked the CNG install -- saved complication and $.

We've used an Origo 6000 series range with oven for about 20 years. Cooks and bakes fine for us. Fuel available at any hardware store. "Butt Simple" indeed! :)

Loren
 

Alan Gomes

Sustaining Member
I did a full-on install of a safe/approved propane galley on our prior boat. Note that it requires a vented OB gas cylinder locker. What with the remote shutoff and sniffer, I can see why boat builders in the 80's liked the CNG install -- saved complication and $.

We've used an Origo 6000 series range with oven for about 20 years. Cooks and bakes fine for us. Fuel available at any hardware store. "Butt Simple" indeed! :)

Loren
Yup. And what with your genius "holy soup can" method of filling the canisters, keeping everything topped off is a breeze. Which reminds me: I came up with what I think is an improvement on your method--version 2.0, as it were--but rather than completely hijack this thread I'll start a new one....
 

Rick R.

Contributing Partner
I did a full-on install of a safe/approved propane galley on our prior boat. Note that it requires a vented OB gas cylinder locker. What with the remote shutoff and sniffer, I can see why boat builders in the 80's liked the CNG install -- saved complication and $.

We've used an Origo 6000 series range with oven for about 20 years. Cooks and bakes fine for us. Fuel available at any hardware store. "Butt Simple" indeed! :)

Loren

We have the Origo alcohol stove and range. Works great, safe, easy. Weird, our boat has the formed and vented propane locker in the starboard aft lazerette.
 
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GrandpaSteve

Sustaining Member
We have the Origo alcohol stove and range. Works great, safe, easy. Weird, our boat has the formed and vented propane locker in the starboard aft lazerette.

Glory Days also has a built-in propane locker in the starboard aft lazerette. When the time comes to replace the CNG range, I will also go with the ORIGO alcohol range.
 
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