E-38 Anchor Locker Upgrade

Dan Morehouse

Member III
I have been reworking my anchor locker because I want to install a windlass, and did not like the factory installed "chain locker" pan which has been the subject of much ink here. The pan isn't stout enough to mount a windlass without reinforcement and modification, and prevents access to the fasteners for the mooring cleats, bow pulpit, bow roller, hatch hinges, and the wiring for the forward nav lights. I began by reading everything on this site I could find which applied, and then...

Cut OUT the pan with a jigsaw. This was far easier than trying to remove it intact by prying, etc.
Anchor locker rebuild.jpg

Pan loose. Note 1x1 lumber attached under edge of opening to give some meat to the flange screws.
Anchor locker rebuild 001.jpg

Lots of extra space, previously wasted. Note door into V-berth on right, and drain hose from the pan on left still attached to drain tube. New bottom of locker will be below this existing drain tube 6"-8".
Anchor locker rebuild 004.jpg

Masking tape showing location new bulkhead will be installed. Note stick protruding from existing drain location.
bulkhead installation 007.jpg

Will try posting pics of bulkhead install later.

Dan Morehouse
1981 E-38 "Next Exit"
 
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u079721

Contributing Partner
Wow - that is one ambitious project. And seeing your 38 with her nose cut open like that gives me the willies. You don't take her out like that I hope!

After we got all the leaks fixed we actually found that forward area to be very useful for storage. But I can see why you might want to make the change. And having full access to the cleats and stanchion bases would be a real plus. But how will you handle drainage in the future? Are you going to reposition the drain hose to be below the level of the new anchor pan floor? Or perhaps just accept that the bottom 6" will be full of water?
 

Dan Morehouse

Member III
No, the boat is grounded while the locker is exposed. I keep the hatch over the hole and clamp a tarp over the whole foredeck.

Once the new bulkhead is in place, I plan to bore a new hole right at the new bottom point. There won't even be a place for the last teaspoon of water to pool.

The old drain tube has a flange on the outside to present a finished appearance on the stem, and it would be nice to find something to put in the new hole to approximate that look. I have seen other boats with what appear to be two drain holes in the stem. You'd never notice them unless you were looking for them.

Dan Morehouse
1981 E-38 "Next Exit"
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Photo Phun

Hi Dan,
I thought it odd that your photo attachment did not show up the "usual way" with a thumbnail that could be clicked on for the larger photo.
So I took the liberty of going to Edit mode for your post. I d/l the picture by dragging it to the desktop. No problems and it opened as a JPG and it is sized to the max that the site software settings allow for, 600 X 800.
I thought about it a minute... haven't had my coffee yet so the gears turn slowly... No obvious problem can I see.

Just for fun I reduced it by an inch, and resaved it as a JPG. I uploaded it and it appears the usual way.

Perhaps there's some bit of behavioral change in the U/L command when we are right exactly at the max limits. (?)

Anyhow, that's a whale of a project, and right up there with any of my "improvements." :rolleyes::rolleyes:

Regards,
Loren
:egrin:
 

Sean Engle

Your Friendly Administrator
Administrator
Founder
Hi Dan,
I thought it odd that your photo attachment did not show up the "usual way" with a thumbnail that could be clicked on for the larger photo.
So I took the liberty of going to Edit mode for your post. I d/l the picture by dragging it to the desktop. No problems and it opened as a JPG and it is sized to the max that the site software settings allow for, 600 X 800.
I thought about it a minute... haven't had my coffee yet so the gears turn slowly... No obvious problem can I see.

Just for fun I reduced it by an inch, and resaved it as a JPG. I uploaded it and it appears the usual way.

Perhaps there's some bit of behavioral change in the U/L command when we are right exactly at the max limits. (?)

Anyhow, that's a whale of a project, and right up there with any of my "improvements." :rolleyes::rolleyes:

Regards,
Loren
:egrin:
I'll make a note to rebuild all the thumbnail images during the break....

//sse
 

rwthomas1

Sustaining Partner
Looks good Dan! I'm planning the exact same modification but with a vertical bulkhead that is parallel to the existing V-berth forward "wall" visible in your pic. That should allow for a small floor at the bottom, just above the waterline. I think you said you were planning on a horizontal windlass? I'm thinking of going vertical for mine. The deeper locker will allow better "fall" for the rode while also keeping that weight a little lower and a farther aft at the same time. Keep the pics going! This is how an E38 anchor locker should be done!

RT
 

Dan Morehouse

Member III
Here are some more shots of the anchor locker sans pan.
Below shows the view through the cabinet door @ the foot of the V-berth. Existing drain tube is visible near center.
Anchor locker rebuild 012.jpg



A look up under the deck fittings @ the bow. Forward pulpit bases are at top of picture, and bow roller bolts (7 of them!!) are in the very peak. These bolts had been lightly coated with resin, possibly when the hull/deck joint was made; it took four hours to remove them all. There is a tie strap connecting one of the bolts to one of the forestay chainplate bolts that pass through the stem. The paint looks grey in this picture, but it is in fact a horrible brown.
Anchor locker rebuild 007.jpg



Two of the four backing plates and nuts under one mooring cleat. The other two have been glassed over.



The existing bulkhead was cut out to admit the FRP pan at the factory. The protruding part will be too difficult to tab around in order to make the new locker watertight, so I cut it out with a hand saw.


The port side with the excess bulkhead part cut off. Note that the shelf protrudes over the foot of the V-berth because the FRP pan extended over it. The shelf and the short bulkhead behind it are just the back side of the finish plywood used in the V-berth to conceal the pan.
bulkhead installation 009.jpg



Dan Morehouse
1981 E-38 "Next Exit"
 

Attachments

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celtium

Member III
I like it!

Hi Dan,

What an undertaking! I have been trying to figure out a way to make the same change you are doing. I guess the bold stroke is the answer. I am looking forward to see your continued progress.

Soldier ON!

Jay
Celtica
Ericson 38-200
SF Bay
 

Dan Morehouse

Member III
new bulkheads

Here's the two bulkheads that will define the new anchor locker, with woven rovings laid out on top of them. The trapezoid piece is 1/2", 9 ply cabinet plywood; probably not waterproof glue. It is to cover the shelf in the existing locker. The triangular piece is 1-1/8", 11 ply marine plywood; definately waterproof glue. It will separate the new locker from a space that will still be accessible from the locker door at the foot of the V-berth.
bulkhead installation 002.jpg

The same two pieces, roving wetted out with West System epoxy.
bulkhead installation 003.jpg

The heavy triangular bulkhead was cut using a 3 piece pattern made up at the boat with battens.
bulkhead installation 005.jpg

A view down the port side of the triangular bulkhead, with the batten pattern on top. The slight hollow present in the forward sections of the E-38 hull is visible. The port and starboard side of this bulkhead were cut square; the top edge, in the foreground, was cut at a 45 degree angle where it will contact the existing forward bulkhead.
bulkhead installation 004.jpg

Dan Morehouse
1981 E-38 "Next Exit"
 
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Dan Morehouse

Member III
Bulkhead installation

The two bulkheads placed with epoxy fillets anchoring them. This port side view includes the forward ends of the teak strips which line the sides of the V-berth compartment. I decided against cutting out these strips, even though it would have made for cleaner tabbing of the new bulkheads, because they are anchored to the hull ahead of the short upper bulkhead visible on left. The next anchor point is AFT of this bulkhead, in the V-berth compartment itself, and without these visible forward sections, it seems the sections in the V-berth would be prone to flimsiness. The factory tabbing on the original bulkhead is visible behind the nav lights wire, with brown paint over.
bulkhead installation 014.jpg

Both new bulkheads filleted in place. The dark line separating them is the top of the original forward bulkhead; this original bulkhead still has the locker door access from the foot of the V-berth, but it is below the heavy triangular bulkhead.
bulkhead installation 012.jpg

Glass tabbing installed over epoxy filleting, after sanding off ragged spots.
bulkhead installation 016.jpg

Both bulkheads completely glassed in place.
anchor locker upgrade 001.jpg

Dan Morehouse
1981 E-38 "Next Exit"
 
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Dan Morehouse

Member III
Painting

Finished locker, half painted with Kiwi Grip.
anchor locker upgrade 004.jpg

A shot of the locker painted. Kiwi Grip is a latex non-skid paint made in New Zealand, normally used on decks and rolled with a textured roller to achieve a pattern. Here I have just brushed it on flat. It is much thicker than normal paint, and I am hoping this will contribute to a bit of sound deadening when the chain goes clanking home. Hole for new bottom drain is not yet drilled, and original drain hole is visible in stem, 6"-8" above new bottom point. Also yet to be installed is a 3/8" stainless U-bolt to be mounted near the bottom of the heavy triangular bulkhead, to serve as a hard attachment point for the end of the chain.
anchor locker upgrade 005.jpg


Dan Morehouse
1981 E-38 "Next Exit"
 
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celtium

Member III
Vereeeeeeee Nice!

Dan,

Very impressive. Couple questions.

Getting the cart before the horse, how are you going to close the top? Are you going to have a maint. access port of some sort? I.E. what if you want to clean out the gunk that will inevitably collect in there, free a knot etc.

Also, I see you have a sampson post just aft of the locker. How did you mount that? It doesn't appear to have any kind of a plate below it to spread the load?

Nice job!

Jay
E 38-200
SF Bay
 

Dan Morehouse

Member III
Jay,

The next part of the project involves mounting a windlass on the forward third of the existing hatch. The aft two thirds will be remounted with new hinges. The windlass will be mounted on a stainless plate that will get bolted to the deck across the forward part of the hatch. That will still afford access to the entire locker.

The samson post is bolted through the deck and backed with large fender washers until I can make a couple backing plates. Two of the four bolts protrude through the very back of the anchor locker, and the other two protrude through the overhead of the V-berth, under the headliner. I added this bit of hardware, but the spot it's mounted has plywood core, not balsa. I have seen other Ericsons with mooring cleats mounted there.

Dan Morehouse
1981 E-38 "Next Exit"
 
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celtium

Member III
Makes sense...

Hi Dan,

That makes sense, I like it.

I currently have my windlass in the same place you have your sampson post, I was concerned about the balsa, but now I feel better. My windlass has all four bolts in the V-berth and I put a SS plate and a nice looking teak cover piece at the headliner.

Watching your project, maybe that will be the new location of my new sampson post. :)

Looking good...

Jay
E38-200
SF Bay
 

rwthomas1

Sustaining Partner
Very nice Dan!! I met with a "glass guy" yesterday for a price to do my locker in a similar fashion. The rough estimate was very reasonable and so he will be starting on it in late January. I'm gonna print your pics to show him however, better to show him before he makes a cut. Keep posting, the work looks great. RT
 

Dan Morehouse

Member III
Rob,

I'm hoping by some time in January I'll have the whole windlass installation finished and can post pictures of it. I'd be interested in seeing pics of how yours goes together, though. It seems like the natural solution for problems with the pans that have been discussed on this site. Sometimes I wonder why Ericson did it the way they did on so many of their boats, but then again, maybe the pan was an easier install for the factory than a bulkhead arrangement like we're discussing. I don't think it was better, though.

And Jay, with your windlass mounted behind the chain locker hatch, where does the anchor rode go from the windlass? And does the rode ever cause a problem crossing the hatch and preventing it from closing or opening?

Dan Morehouse
1981 E-38 "Next Exit"
 

celtium

Member III
Yes, yes, and yes

I always have a problem tailing the rode. Very irritating. The whole process really pisses me off. When I bought the boat, we couldn't figure a proper place to install the windlass, it was the lesser of two weebles.

Your solution is brilliant, ambitious, but very doable! How'd you come up with this idea? You may go down in the anals of Ericson Forum History!
:egrin:


Jay
Celtica
E38-200
SF Bay
 

Dan Morehouse

Member III
Jay,

Well, maybe not so much. I plagiarized the windlass configuration idea from Mark Reed, who also has a 38 and posts on this site. He provided a link to pictures of his installation, which was done by a PO. Here's the link:
www.peak.org/~reedbug/windlass.htm

I believe he is somewhere in Mexico with his boat right now. Or Central America. Or the South Pacific, maybe.

Before seeing his pictures, I was trying to figure out where to place a windlass, and couldn't shake the tendency to assume the back of the hatch was the spot. But I couldn't solve the problem of the rode crossing the hatch. If you look at where his is located, and then imagine it with the pan missing, you get an idea of what I had in mind when I started this project. His windlass is a vertical model, so the motor takes up space below deck. Mine is horizontal, so is entirely above deck...and with the pan gone, you can see there should still be room to access the chain locker to clean out the drain, free snarls, etc. In addition, I will make no attempt to make the plate which mounts the windlass watertight (except to seal the core in the way of the bolt holes), since I don't care if water gets into the locker. Because of that, there will be no bedding sealant; if I ever need to access the nuts for the cleats, bow roller, pulpit stanchions, etc., I can readily unbolt the entire windlass plate to open the whole locker cavity up.

That's my plan. We will see if reality rewards me or punishes me!

Dan Morehouse
1981 E-38 "Next Exit"
 

celtium

Member III
Thougts

Hi Dan,

I've contacted Mark a couple times re cruising Mexico etc. I believe he is in Mexico currently.

I have a horizontal windlass as well. With the windlass mounted well forward like you are going to do, it's going to be fairly centered. Will that cause you issues with access to your sampson post? It appears that it will and I wouldn't think you'd want full load on the windlass?

And how do you figure on the hawse (?) pipe access to drop the rode into the well? Are you going to simply leave a cut-out in the glass hatch? Or are you going to install a 'proper' tube?

Intrigued,

Jay
Celtica
E38-200
SF Bay
 

Dan Morehouse

Member III
The windlass mounted on the front third of the hatch positions the chain drop almost directly over the deepest part of the new locker configuration, so there won't be any need for a hawse pipe.

I envision taking a chain snubber made of nylon line from the grab point on the chain through the new bow roller and back directly past the windlass to the samson post. Because the windlass is slightly offset to port to align with the roller trough, which is slightly offset to starboard, the snubber should just miss the windlass on its way to the samson post, or just lightly brush it. The windlass is polished stainless, so shouldn't pose a chafe point if the snubber does contact it lightly on its way past.

Dan Morehouse
1981 E-38 "Next Exit"
 
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