E32-2 restoration thread

kapnkd

kapnkd
I also test fitted my entry hatch I purchased from Kapnkd, It fits perfectly, and is likely better than anything I can make on my own: The old hatch was nonexistant. Thank you Kapnkd! Old boats are a lot of work, I still intend to splash this year.
kimg0814-jpg.41884
I’m so glad to see it WAS a perfect fit and looking so good installed. …Nice to know the hatch found it’s perfect home.
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
I also found some and fixed some awful deck rot around the cockpit cubby holes. This is a potential trouble spot for all of our old boats I would think, as the cubby holes are at a downward slope, not glassed in, nor do they have any sort of drainage: View attachment 41882
That entire are of the rear deck is a solid sheet of plywood, or in my case, crumbly dust. I managed to scoop it all out without cutting the top off.
The new piece was cut into three sections to be slid in and glassed: View attachment 41883
I then glassed the top back in and added much needed drain holes.

My advice to anyone with a seventies vintage boat is to glass those areas in and add drainage holes to avoid this eventual rot spot.
Yes…Those convenient cockpit storage areas are/were an unfortunate water trap. We noticed and fixed ours early on back in the late 70’s. …Excellent post by you.
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
Project update:
I have completed the engine rebuild:

View attachment 41881

The internals were in good shape, I was able to cut the valves and seats with shop equipment. Rebuild of the water pump and carb, transmission was in great shape. Put it all back together an ran it for two hours in our dyno bay. Its ready to be plugged back in. This was the easiest part of the project for me, Ive been maintaining and rebuilding caterpillar engines for eighteen years now. Engines are what I do for a living. Obviously, CAT yellow is the only engine paint choice. I did go with the indigo optical ignition kit, I love old engines and vehicles, but I draw the line at points, especially in boats.
Looking GREAT in “CAT” yellow. The lighter color will also make it easier to see when working in those hard to get to areas that also lack lighting. Good choice!

The A-4 is a super great little engine. Ours served faithfully for many many years even with the raw salt water cooling system. Now living in Michigan, I see lots of older boats with A-4’s still performing like new.
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
I have found this vlog (https://www.youtube.com/c/SailLife) to be very informative and helpful, although it is based on a Warrior 38 instead of an Ericson. The vlog covers a significant rebuild of the boat (Athena), including re-coring deck, gutting and redesign of the interior, hull problems, etc.

Dave
Any port in a storm! The postings on YouTube for boating issues are an incredible tool and most often are not specific or generic to a given brand or vessel model.
 

Solarken

Junior Member
I found this photo in an ad on YW, 1975 model. I can see why you might want to re-orient it. But first let some other owners weigh in on how the stock head layout works for them.
Hi
I’m 6’5” tall. The head fits me and I can close the door. I’ve also put in a Dometic electric with a much bigger bowl.
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
I have found this vlog (https://www.youtube.com/c/SailLife) to be very informative and helpful, although it is based on a Warrior 38 instead of an Ericson. The vlog covers a significant rebuild of the boat (Athena), including re-coring deck, gutting and redesign of the interior, hull problems, etc.

Dave
Argggh! …IF the older 32-II (or ‘2’??) has a head problem - it is definitely room!!

Not so bad when I was just 29 and weighed around 150 - BUT - as the years passed and inevitable weight gains occurred!! …I came to realize the head was more in line for the size person from FantasyIsland’s “Tattoo” character!

Otherwise, it’s now more a bit of a torture chamber for us older people in need of the “RELIEF” plaque on the door.

Thank goodness the door operates two ways closing off the main cabin from forward allowing enough room to not bruise our elbows and more seeking “RELIEF”!!

In retrospect, lots of stories can be told (and probably should have been added to the log) about using our head - especially in heavier seas/passages! ;-)))
 

Michael Edwards

Member II
Hey,
I am late to the party! AnnaDor is a 1978 model 32’. I want to respond to the question about the Head. The 1st mate is a very long legged woman…
What we did was turned the toilet toward the center line about 30*. Swinging the door to the salon gives pretty good leg room and privacy(for a 32’ boat).
We have been updating our boat for two decades and have posted much of the work we accomplished here as well as gained a lot from others on this sight.
Our boat has an all teak interior on which an entire season was spent varnishing. It was a dark smelly dungeon, but now feels and looks like a yacht!
You are truly a craftsman of high skill.
A word on the E-32, they are fast, stiff, and fun while zooming past others! Well except for J-Boats with Mylar sails. They are so fast that the pain is short-lived. But I beat them on points!!
 

cdh4088

Member II
Hey,
I am late to the party! AnnaDor is a 1978 model 32’. I want to respond to the question about the Head. The 1st mate is a very long legged woman…
What we did was turned the toilet toward the center line about 30*. Swinging the door to the salon gives pretty good leg room and privacy(for a 32’ boat).
We have been updating our boat for two decades and have posted much of the work we accomplished here as well as gained a lot from others on this sight.
Our boat has an all teak interior on which an entire season was spent varnishing. It was a dark smelly dungeon, but now feels and looks like a yacht!
You are truly a craftsman of high skill.
A word on the E-32, they are fast, stiff, and fun while zooming past others! Well except for J-Boats with Mylar sails. They are so fast that the pain is short-lived. But I beat them on points!!
Hi, could I bother you for some interior pics? Mine is mostly apart, and I have had a hard time finding pictures on line of another 78' boat like mine.
 

jpginsu

Junior Member
I just saw this post. I've been rehabbing my 1974 32 that I bought from the marina. It was abandoned and the marina gave me a great deal on it. In regards to your question regarding the Catalina kit for port lights, I rehabbed all of mine in 2020. The seals and gaskets work great. no leaks.port picture before.JPGPort picture after.JPG
 

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cdh4088

Member II
I have finally corrected the absolute mess I made of the rudder installation. The lower bushing was heavily worn and loose, an inch of rudder tip play in all directions. There was no grease fitting installed in the log at all.
At first I tried to inject a graphite impregnated epoxy mixture into the bearing to tighten it up, but instead of purchasing the correct release wax for the shaft I used cheap car wax. the shaft became epoxied into the bushing and the amount of force required to get it back out cracked the plastic bushing sleeve, ruining the entire bushing assembly. I had to use a 20lb. cast dumbbell weight as a hammer to free it. Much cursing ensued.
The bushing itself is a reduced o.d. 2-3/8 bore standard bronze bushing, and the sleeve is actually a piece of machined 2-1/2" pvc pipe glassed into the hull. I was surprised that a piece of cheap sch40 pvc pipe was used for this application. I assume it was never intended to be beaten so savagely.
I made a new bushing and sleeve using sch80 pipe: KIMG0960.JPGAnd then another problem arose, The custom made foss rudder that came with the boat was made with out of spec tubing. It was not perfectly round and would not accept a new bushing. I rigged up a "reverse belt sander" using a drill and sanding belts to round it out: KIMG0958.JPG Once that was finished and the new bushing actually fit the shaft, the new bushing was glassed into the hull and the rudder was installed.
Now onto the next problem, the old rudder is made of steel, wood and heavy fiberglass. It naturally sinks and hangs from the boat from the top cap. The new rudder is made of lightweight foam with a thin shell and is very buoyant, pressing up against the hull instead. I modified the skeg area and made a flattened round area to accept a ride bushing made of nylon to bear this load. the packing box also has an identical bushing between it and the steering arm to capture the rudder and prevent any vertical movement in either direction: KIMG0980.JPGA 1/2" aluminum reinforcement plate was added to the cockpit floor to prevent the upper bearing from wandering around, and to stiffen the entire area: KIMG0979.JPGWhile I was at it I added a remote grease hose for the lower bushing that pokes through just underneath the engine control panel in the cockpit for easy maintenance, as I have spent so much time in the engine bay crawlspace at this point I have no intention of ever entering it again If it can be avoided: KIMG1030.JPGThe finished product is a new rudder with zero vertical or lateral play: KIMG0981.JPG
Another thing I found interesting is that this is not patterned off of the 32-2 rudder, it has a different shape that the previous owner and Foss company cooked up. I sure hope it works for the amount of effort it was to install.

If any other EY member is in need of a new 2-3/8 rudder bushing I can create another easily for a reasonable price, I could not find anything like it for sale anywhere.

Anyway that is my rudder adventure, one I hope to never to embark on again! But I am in this thing too far to quit now.
 
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cdh4088

Member II
Another issue I ran into with the 32-2 is that the more components I put in, the less room there is to access them for service. once the engine, exhaust, locker panels and fuel tank are installed, this tiny panel is the only access to the rear of the engine, the prop shaft packing, and most of the steering: KIMG1026.JPG Completely unacceptable for a claustrophobic career mechanic. The panel between the quarter berth and engine bay is not structural in any way, its just tacked on to the tub of the cockpit by a few screws and glue. So I had my way with it: KIMG1029.JPG The new access panel has been expanded most the entire length of the quarter berth and increased down to the floor. Easy access to the rear of the engine, prop shaft packing box, fuel tank and steering assembly. the original "peekaboo" panel is still removable as well, but now I can woller around in the engine bay to my hearts content without getting stuck. All of these panels were previously installed with screws, But I have replaced these with a multitude of brass bolt latches, making access quick, and easy. I will admit that it does look a bit like a hardware store in the quarter berth: KIMG1023.JPG
But, at least everything will be easier to access now.
 
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Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Here is a fun one: on the bottom of the sewage tank is written "Bill Whites lunch bucket" . Mr White wasn't popular at the Ericson factory apparently. :D

Dang! That's funny!

Somewhere, back in the site archives, I recall a picture that someone posted. I was of a Polaroid photo they found behind a settee when doing some restoration on their '70's E-27 interior. It showed two smiling young guys, and the back it said "we built this boat!"
What a way-cool memento......
:)
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
I have finally corrected the absolute mess I made of the rudder installation. The lower bushing was heavily worn and loose, an inch of rudder tip play in all directions. There was no grease fitting installed in the log at all.
At first I tried to inject a graphite impregnated epoxy mixture into the bearing to tighten it up, but instead of purchasing the correct release wax for the shaft I used cheap car wax. the shaft became epoxied into the bushing and the amount of force required to get it back out cracked the plastic bushing sleeve, ruining the entire bushing assembly. I had to use a 20lb. cast dumbbell weight as a hammer to free it. Much cursing ensued.
The bushing itself is a reduced o.d. 2-3/8 bore standard bronze bushing, and the sleeve is actually a piece of machined 2-1/2" pvc pipe glassed into the hull. I was surprised that a piece of cheap sch40 pvc pipe was used for this application. I assume it was never intended to be beaten so savagely.
I made a new bushing and sleeve using sch80 pipe: View attachment 43074And then another problem arose, The custom made foss rudder that came with the boat was made with out of spec tubing. It was not perfectly round and would not accept a new bushing. I rigged up a "reverse belt sander" using a drill and sanding belts to round it out: View attachment 43075 Once that was finished and the new bushing actually fit the shaft, the new bushing was glassed into the hull and the rudder was installed.
Now onto the next problem, the old rudder is made of steel, wood and heavy fiberglass. It naturally sinks and hangs from the boat from the top cap. The new rudder is made of lightweight foam with a thin shell and is very buoyant, pressing up against the hull instead. I modified the skeg area and made a flattened round area to accept a ride bushing made of nylon to bear this load. the packing box also has an identical bushing between it and the steering arm to capture the rudder and prevent any vertical movement in either direction: View attachment 43076A 1/2" aluminum reinforcement plate was added to the cockpit floor to prevent the upper bearing from wandering around, and to stiffen the entire area: View attachment 43077While I was at it I added a remote grease hose for the lower bushing that pokes through just underneath the engine control panel in the cockpit for easy maintenance, as I have spent so much time in the engine bay crawlspace at this point I have no intention of ever entering it again If it can be avoided: View attachment 43078The finished product is a new rudder with zero vertical or lateral play: View attachment 43079
Another thing I found interesting is that this is not patterned off of the 32-2 rudder, it has a different shape that the previous owner and Foss company cooked up. I sure hope it works for the amount of effort it was to install.

If any other EY member is in need of a new 2-3/8 rudder bushing I can create another easily for a reasonable price, I could not find anything like it for sale anywhere.

Anyway that is my rudder adventure, one I hope to never to embark on again! But I am in this thing too far to quit now.
WOW!! …Quite a difference from the original (below from our ‘73) …I/we will be anxious to hear how it performs for you!!
250A7C71-023A-4E08-8DAC-396E3C2350DB.jpeg
 

cdh4088

Member II
WOW!! …Quite a difference from the original (below from our ‘73) …I/we will be anxious to hear how it performs for you!!
View attachment 43131

I have the paper that shows the original rudder superimposed over the new design. Have a look and see what you make of it. The leading edge has been reduced and the aft edge extended. Extended overall length, and the tip has been given a more forward sweep. I didn't weigh either rudder, but this one weighs a fraction of the old one. Either way, its the rudder I have so it will have to work :)Ruddershape.jpg
 
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Mark F

Contributing Partner
Blogs Author
I'm pretty sure that is the Schumacher designed rudder shape. I modified a spare rudder that I had to an approximation of that design. On my boat (E27) it works way better than the old rudder shape. Especially off of the wind. First photo is old rudder and second is the modified.
 

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