E32-200 Owner's Manual

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
Posting this mostly for future reference.

Among the various 32-200 owners active here on the forum, no one seems to have an Ericson-produced owner's manual that is specific to the model. If you are reading this and find yourself in possession of a real 32-200 manual, your karma will forever benefit if you upload a copy to the Resources section of this site.

For some exterior systems and rigging, the manual for the E32-3, the previous design of the E32 is a very good place to start.

The 32-200 was the last in a series of three boats that Ericson produced with an aft cabin double-quarterberth. The first two were the 38-200 and the 34-200, which seems to be commonly referred to as the 34-2. Here is an article documenting this lineage.

So, for interior (and some exterior) systems, the manual for the 34-2 is a good place to start. Except for U-shaped salon settee and slightly larger closet space for the V-berth, the 34-2 and 32-200 are twins, as far as the interior goes. The manual linked here even includes part number references for Edson steering (not Yacht Specialties) and for Isomat (not Kenyon) masts and rigging. I find that almost all of the components and layouts referenced for the 34-2 match my 32-200.

The previous owner of my boat was an architect and probably better than most of us at representing three-dimensional systems on two-dimensional pieces of paper (sketching, I mean). I have uploaded some of his drawings that I found helpful for understanding the 200 series plumbing.

@Pete the Cat @clayton @frosero7744 @Rick R.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Great stuff.

Even the hull didn't escape from modifications, since the rudder was moved six inches aft to allow for a full double bunk in the aft cabin without interference from the rudder post. As a result, the Ericson 32-200 benefits from improved steering control and a longer waterline for better speed.

Good to have the rudder move confirmed. But how is the waterline longer?
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
As a result, the Ericson 32-200 benefits from improved steering control and a longer waterline for better speed.
Surmise is that the "marketing" dept controlled the brochure content.......... (sigh).
Steering (slight) improvement downwind had to be for real, tho.
 

clayton

Member III
it might be the partial skeglet added the same 6" of length as it moved further aft as well? No easy way to accurately measure the actual waterline. PHRF rating is the same.
 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
Great stuff.

Even the hull didn't escape from modifications, since the rudder was moved six inches aft to allow for a full double bunk in the aft cabin without interference from the rudder post. As a result, the Ericson 32-200 benefits from improved steering control and a longer waterline for better speed.

Good to have the rudder move confirmed. But how is the waterline longer?
Sailboatdata.com lists identical LWL measurements for the 32-3 and 32-200. Sailing journalism is, in my experience, imprecise.

In terms of sliding the rudder back a small number of inches (or whatever), my boat has a protrusion that extends away from the hull-form to match the rudder's location. Does a 32-3 have this hull "extension" in the same place? This fiberglass nub may be the intersection of marketing and reality.

Hanging at the yard, pre-wash:

Extra 3kts of Theoretical Boatspeed.jpg

Go faster.jpg
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
I can see why the skeg extension was necessary.

The 32-3 rudder tube/quadrant is somewhat difficult of inside access, but you can reach it from both sides (Lazarette hatch and from the Qberth). I imagine the -200 is different back there.

Ericson 32-3 1985.JPG

1985 E32-3 rudder position
 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
Access to the underside of the quadrant, binnacle and pedestal guard in the 32-200 is available after removing a teak soffit from the rear quarterberth.

Steering cables can be unbolted from the stern cockpit locker, but otherwise access to the top of the quadrant is limited. Work on the rudder post would be via the cockpit locker.

I can only imagine how tight that space would be on the Pacific Seacraft 32-333 with the "sugar scoop" transom.

IMG_7546.jpg
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
I get it now. The -200s have the radial on the ceiling, just under the deck. The cables make a 90-degree turn up into the pedestal, so are there sheaves on the other side of the bronze plate? Or do those black sleeves somehow guide the 90-degree change in direction?

For comparison, the -3 suffix boats have the rudder post in plain sight. The -200 design really made elaborate changes to push the rudder post aft and allow for a bigger aft cabin/berth.

E32-3 rudder post and quadrent.jpg
 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
I get it now. The -200s have the radial on the ceiling, just under the deck. The cables make a 90-degree turn up into the pedestal, so are there sheaves on the other side of the bronze plate? Or do those black sleeves somehow guide the 90-degree change in direction?
The lighting is poor in the first photo. What look like black sleeves are themselves bronze sheaves:

IMG_7908.JPG

Space-wise, there were a number of adjustments in the hull to accommodate a larger rear berth. Along with the rudder being pushed back, the entire quadrant and binnacle area in the cockpit was raised about 1.5" proud of the lowest level. This is the "pedestal helm raised about 2" referenced in the Boats.com article I to which I linked earlier in the thread:

IMG_8378.JPG

I'm not sure this bump up was worth the tripping hazard as the teak soffit that covers the underside of the helm in the quarterberth robs the user of any space gained by pushing up the helm.

Perhaps it was an issue of getting enough space between the upper and lower rudder shaft support points. If the rudder hull exit and the upper cockpit deck level were too close together, the rudder would exert a lot of twisting force with a short lever.
 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
One more note on the Owner's Manual question. I've been thinking and reading about Whisker Poles and reading up in the manuals.

The whisker pole section in the 34-2 manual (page 80) is directly lifted from the 32-3 manual, including quoting the J sail dimension of the 32-3 (13' 9" feet) which does not seem like it should be the same length for the two-feet-longer 34-2 boat. Sailboatdata.com puts the J dimension of the 34-2 at 15 feet. The 34-2 manual is likely to be wrong.

Point being? Maybe no one reads the manuals very carefully when they are buying a brand new boat, so the documents should be treated with some skepticism.
 

frosero7744

Member II
Sailboatdata.com lists identical LWL measurements for the 32-3 and 32-200. Sailing journalism is, in my experience, imprecise.

In terms of sliding the rudder back a small number of inches (or whatever), my boat has a protrusion that extends away from the hull-form to match the rudder's location. Does a 32-3 have this hull "extension" in the same place? This fiberglass nub may be the intersection of marketing and reality.

Hanging at the yard, pre-wash:

View attachment 36552

View attachment 36553

Thats a sexy boat Tom.
 
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