E32 Boom/Gooseneck Fitment & Rehab

sharonov

Member II
.....I'm having the darnedest time knocking the knurled pin out of the outhaul assembly. I've tried PB Blaster, WD-40, knocking it with a lag bolt and mallet/hammer, cursing at it, whispering sweet nothings. It's not budging.......
Thoughts, suggestions?
Been there: soaking in PB Blaster, soaking in Coca-cola, soaking in vinegar, boiling in water, heating with propane torch, freezing in the freezer, hammering with small sledgehammer and punch on a block of wood, cussing it repeatedly. Went for two weeks. Two things I have not tried: pressing it out and drilling it out. What worked in the end was bringing a wad of cash to Rig-Rite. It was highway robbery but got me back sailing. Here is a thread from 2017:
 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
I gave it the old college try on removing paint from the interior of the gooseneck. Really no one will ever see it, and it will not have an impact on your boat's performance. If you're having a tough time removing paint, that means it's adhered well, so if you just rough it up a bit, the primer you put on top should stick to it just fine. I put that in the 'don't sweat the small stuff' category. Sounds like you have it correct.

As for the pin, I left the cap in the boom for support while I was knocking on the pin. Make sure you are hitting the correct end of the pin. You strike the non-ridged end - here are my notes, part way down the string. Have some faith in the PB Blaster and try another overnight soak. Maybe take something sharp and clean out any corrosion in the edge between the pin and the cap. If you can create an indentation into which the Blaster can soak it may penetrate better.
 

vanilladuck

E32-3 / San Francisco
Soaking in Coca-cola -- wouldn't have thought of that :cool: Been focusing small iterative bits of energy on this and the pin isn't budging. Some exciting pics of the shenanigans, including the PB Blaster which pools and then seeps into the knurled pin pocket. I'm assuming that's running through at least the first layer of the aluminum outhaul assembly. The paint faded slightly after boiling the piece for a few minutes:

MVIMG_20200717_205929.jpg IMG_20200717_182031.jpg IMG_20200717_182002.jpg

I'm chatting with a neighbor who is a sailor and has some tools. We might use his vise and impact driver this week to see if we can move the pin.

I also called Rig Rite and got a quote for just the cast piece, which is approx $334. I'm strongly considering just ordering that to get back to sailing.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
If it was me: apply heat and pound away on a strong drift pin. Keep pounding.

True, stainless steel/aluminum "corrosion welding" may have occurred. So, it's possible the pin cannot be removed (I once could not remove an ss outhaul fitting from a boom track, and also could not remove binnacle tubing from the cast aluminum frame.)

It would be hard to drill stainless out of aluminum, so pound away to near destruction.

Ask Rigrite if they have that part on the shelf. Sometimes there is a six-month wait as this stuff is often manufactured on demand.
 

Kenneth K

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
If you're at the point where "destruction" of the existing fitting is an acceptable outcome, I might start drilling small (1/16" or less) holes into the aluminum casting, alongside the stainless steel pin (as mentioned earlier, drilling SS out of aluminum is NOT likely, unless you have a machine shop). But, drilling small holes in the aluminium holding the pin might, (a) allow the PB blaster to soak in and undo some of the corrosion, and (b) loosen some of the surface corrosion and adhesion between the two metals. With, say, 4 holes drilled in each side, I'd probably try re-soaking, re-heating, twisting (if you can get vice-grips on the pin) and pounding the pin out again. If it won't come out, then drill 4 more holes, and repeat as necessary.
 

vanilladuck

E32-3 / San Francisco
Murphy's Inverted Law of Success - Something you're expecting not to succeed, might spontaneously go your way :p

I called RigRite this afternoon to order a new aluminum casting and knurled pin. On a whim, I took a beer down to the garage tonight and gave the pin another few whacks. Sure enough, it budged and then came right out. My neighbors probably think I've gone crazy from sheltering-in-place too long from the maniacal laughter. My triumph:

IMG_20200723_195418.jpg

On to the next problem... the frozen starboard sheave:

IMG_20200723_202538.jpg

With the pin removed, the sheave would not move. Severe corrosion had glued this thing to the inside of the aluminum casting. I took turns prying at it with a long flat screwdriver, chipping at the 35-year-old plastic of the sheave with a chisel, and soaking it in PB Blaster. After about 40 minutes I got it loose and it dropped out on my workbench. I'm debating whether I want to try and use the old boom end casting or switch to the new one from Rigrite when it arrives. If I use the existing, I will need to sand or grind off all the corrosion from the inside slot where the starboard sheave sits, allowing it to spin freely. And, even then I'm not sure if I'm risking the corrosion coming back at some point. I suppose I could coat the area, the pin, and the bushing on the sheaves with something. Tef-gel doesn't seem appropriate to me. Open to suggestions.

IMG_20200723_202518.jpg IMG_20200723_212229.jpg IMG_20200723_212206.jpg
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
There are metal refinishers in our city that would clean it and re-anodize it. Perhaps some research is needed in your area.
 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
Cancel the RigRite order or send it back if it has already shipped. You'll have plenty of opportunities to spend that $330 on other stuff for your boat. It took 35 years for the corrosion to get as bad as you experienced. A new fitting will get corroded too.

Scrub out the pin holes with a small wire brush, get your new sheaves installed, go sail the boat and have fun.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Agree. If a boat gets used, moving parts don't freeze. And it doesn't occur on static parts if an interested owner constantly examines them, worries about them, washes out dirt and salt, renews the Tef-gel every 20 years, and joins this forum of paranoid anticipation and overkill.

I come to believe all our frozen fittings, fatal corrosion and rot can be traced to some five-year-period in the yacht's past during which the owner lost interest, got sick, received a promotion or went to prison. But I think even in prison I would be saying, "did you wash the boat down last week?"
 

Rufus McCool

Junior Member
I have a question, although slightly off the subject. What is the center sheave used for? My two outer sheaves are the reefing lines. Both the outhaul and topping lift go to cleats on the boom, exiting just forward of midway.
I suppose it could be whatever I want it to be, but wondered what others were doing or its officially intended purpose.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
On most boats the center sheave is for the topping lift, which has a purchase inside the boom. The internal control line exits the boom and cleats on the exterior.

Kenyon boom end reef sheaves.JPG...boom end.JPG

Note the ears for attachment of a fixed topping lift or for storing the main halyard. One was damaged, so I ground them both off, as I have no use for them.
 
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vanilladuck

E32-3 / San Francisco
Update: Gooseneck and outhaul assembly are primed, painted, and ready to be re-installed. I found a 3/8"-20 bolt that was 2.5" long instead of 2" to use to attach the gooseneck to the toggle. Now, the threads of the bolt aren't rubbing on the toggle. Probably doesn't make that big of a difference, but I'm partial to it. I'll double check to make sure the extra bolt length doesn't interfere with the swing of the boom to port. Also used a couple SS washers on either side to decrease rubbing on the aluminum gooseneck.

Before: IMG_20200724_210312.jpg Now: IMG_20200728_201618.jpg

Other prettiness: IMG_20200726_230902.jpg IMG_20200728_190334.jpg IMG_20200728_201456.jpg IMG_20200728_201523.jpg

I talked to RigRite and they will let me return the unused parts for a 20% restocking fee. I'll probably keep the knurled pin. If ya'll know anyone who wants the outhaul assy, PM me ;)
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
On most boats the center sheave is for the topping lift, which has a purchase inside the boom. The internal control line exits the boom and cleats on the exterior.

View attachment 34785...View attachment 34784

Note the ears for attachment of a fixed topping lift or for storing the main halyard. One was damaged, so I ground them both off, as I have no use for them.
Same-appearing end casting on our boom, but the center sheave is for the mainsail outhaul, and like yours that short wire leads to a hidden tackle inside the boom.

The 'ears' and their thru-pin on ours sport an SS ring, to which the main halyard is clipped any time the sail is furled. We pull the halyard tight, to prevent swinging. The mainsheet, opposing the lift from the halyard, keeps the boom solidly in place, and the mainsheet tackle makes a convenient handhold when going in or out of the companionway.

Our boat never had a boom topping lift fitted, because EY equipped it with a rod vang. The original vang had a gas cylinder inside, and it had leaked before we bought the boat, and I replaced it with a spring-return version from a different vendor.
 
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Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Rod vang definitely racier, Loren.

Bryan, that looks grand. When you put the boom back together, note how the reef lines run past the anchor pin inside the boom. The prior rigger had mine passing over the pin on their way to exit at the gooseneck sheaves. That made a lot of unnecessary friction.

And as you know, that job is when a fish tape earns its keep. My $10 electrician's fish tape is the most borrowed piece of gear on the boat.
 

vanilladuck

E32-3 / San Francisco
Appreciate the tip, Christian, and will give that anchor pin a look. Fish tape was one of the first things I added to the boat's toolbox. Inspiration from a combination of your video mentions and my network engineering career history.
 

vanilladuck

E32-3 / San Francisco
When you finish something, why not make a celebratory video?


I'm glad I looked inside the boom before reassembling. I found a) the reef lines were indeed laying atop the the pin, b) an archaeological artifact, c) a lot of dirt:

IMG_20200801_193949.jpg IMG_20200801_195707.jpg

I'm guessing some kind of creature created this little nest-rock-thing, maybe while the boom was laying on the deck for the last couple weeks. I dug it out carefully along with a couple other similar pieces and hosed the inside of the boom out with the fresh water hose.

I gave up tapping new threaded holes in the forward end of the boom/gooseneck. After widening/retapping the hole on the underside--which I could not for the life of me figure out what size and pitch the hole was previously. Multiple sizing chains and random screws could not help me identify--I dropped the tapping bit into the marina water. 'Tis Poseidon's charm now. Here's to the memory of the first and far from the last tool I will drop in the ocean:

IMG_20200802_153140.jpg

After adding the underside screw which is properly sized to 1/4"-20, putting the two side screws in with washers. The gooseneck doesn't sit completely flush to the boom, but it is a lot sturdier with now 'wiggle' (sorry no photo, can post one later). I also replaced what was left of the nearly disintegrated cotter pin holding the toggle to the mast. Now, an excuse to use those drift pins! Then tested and tightened all the screws within sight of the mast/boom area.

Feels like I took a one day project and stretched it over a few weeks. But, that's not a bad thing, especially since I'm taking my time to learn the systems, parts, caveats, and surprises about this boat. I'm sure there's more on the way since she's been floating for 35 years. Thanks again for all the tips here!
 
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