E38-200 Autopilot Question ??

rbonilla

"don't tread on me" member XVXIIIII
auto pilot question: I want to mount a direct drive Garmin Auto Pilot, on my 1987 Ericson 38-200, I have used the belt drives, and I was not happy with the function and location...Has anyone installed direct drive ( to the rudder shaft/via installiation of a arm - on the rudder post ) ?
 

Navman

Member III
I installed a hydraulic linear drive below decks on my 38. It is a SI TEX control head and an Octopus drive. I measured for the diameter of the steering quadrant very carefully and ordered it from Edson. The drilling of the hole through the rudder shaft was the hardest part. I set up my quadrant to be perpendicular to the center line of the boat so I could mount the drive under the helm seat. I made a "shelf" and glassed it to the two longitudinal stringers. The shelf is also glassed with a SS pan on it. Also had a hard time cutting off the Delran bushing so I could fit the quadrant on the shaft.
 

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Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author



Ryan Levinson is a project I was thinking of. His blog here seems to be missing, but there are links in the threads above.
 

rbonilla

"don't tread on me" member XVXIIIII



Ryan Levinson is a project I was thinking of. His blog here seems to be missing, but there are links in the threads above.
any updates avail from this owner? I was advised to plan on 2,000 lbs load on push arm....for max loads / hevy seas / down wind...the Garmin engineers advised NEVER to mess with or mount to the quadrent...ONLY CENTERLINE OF RUDDER POST....so, has this install been in place for a while and used usder open ocean / heavy seas?...any signs of twisting of quadrent?... a BIG thank you ++ Richard / Colorado
 

rbonilla

"don't tread on me" member XVXIIIII
I installed a hydraulic linear drive below decks on my 38. It is a SI TEX control head and an Octopus drive. I measured for the diameter of the steering quadrant very carefully and ordered it from Edson. The drilling of the hole through the rudder shaft was the hardest part. I set up my quadrant to be perpendicular to the center line of the boat so I could mount the drive under the helm seat. I made a "shelf" and glassed it to the two longitudinal stringers. The shelf is also glassed with a SS pan on it. Also had a hard time cutting off the Delran bushing so I could fit the quadrant on the shaft.
Did you do all this work yourself, or have it done for you ?... what exactly is the Delran Bushing, and what is/was it's purpose..?
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
any updates avail from this owner?

Ryan Levinson took his 38 to the South Seas after a heroic preparation. He has sold the boat and retired from sailing. He made his mark despite the challenges of muscular dystrophy.
 
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Joliba

Contributing Member
any updates avail from this owner?

Ryan Levinson took his 38 to the South Seas after a heroic preparation. He has sold the boat and retired from sailing. He made his mark despite the challenges of muscular dystrophy.
Ryan has not retired from sailing. He is currently in French Polynesia living and sailing aboard his Looping 47 catamaran, “Kiapa Nui” along with his wife Nicole. He is available and will gladly share his experience with the linear drive system he installed on “Naoma”, his 1988 Ericson 38-200.
Mike Jacker
 

Navman

Member III
Sorry I didn't pick up on the questions above about the bushing and leverage. The bushing can be seen in the last photo I posted. It is the black sleeve. It simply fills the space on the rudder shaft. When the bushing was removed the Edson tiller arm took up the space almost exactly As far as the position of mounting, I do not think it makes a bit of difference. I'm no engineer but I would think the leverage applied to turn the post will be the same from any position as the length of the lever does not change and moves in a radius. I have even heard of them being mounted backwards as that was the only available space. I think the mounting of the drive unit directly on top of the longitudinal stringer also lends greater potential strength. As you said, the pressure the arm exerts is large, and the stringer and platform lend greater strength and prevents hull flex and distortion. I did perform all of the work myself. It just took a lot of investigation and spent a lot of time "down under", the cockpit that is. I did run into roadblocks and had to do some things twice, but that's what it is all about. Tweeking the system until you get it right.
 

rbonilla

"don't tread on me" member XVXIIIII
"It simply fills the space on the rudder shaft"...yes, we were discussing and thought it may have just been used during mfg...to keep things in place, till the rudder post sleeve was secure...then, once through bolts were in place...not really needed anymore...but, hard to remove...so - just left in place...does that sound possible to you Don ?
 

Navman

Member III
Sorry I didn't reply earlier. The collar may have been simply to fill the space until all was secured but Why would they use such a costly collar when there are many more cheaper products which could save the same purpose. It may help take some of the strain off of the rudder post shaft and bearing by only allowing a small amount of upward lift before the collar tops out on the upper shaft housing?IMG_2093.JPG
 

rbonilla

"don't tread on me" member XVXIIIII
I am trying to go with and install the Garmin class b / compact unit..direct
to center of rudder post..order a cam or ram arm..
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
The collar holds the quadrant up and keeps the cables aligned and the rudder in position--no? Pretty important, unless I;m missing something.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
I happened upon this drawing, which states the reason for the collar/spacer (rudder sleeve) discussed above:

rudder tube.jpg

Click to enlarge
 
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