Ericson 35 ADV Bad experience for the crew of the "Island Hopper"

Saverio

Member II
La Guardia Costiera americana a 6 miglia da Cape Point, North Carolina, interviene per salvare una barca danneggiata, un Ericson 35 ADV Brutta esperienza per l'equipaggio dell '"Island Hopper" un vecchio Ericson 35. Nel tardo pomeriggio di due giorni fa durante la navigazione verso gli Stati Uniti States Negli stati di Cape Point nelle acque della Carolina del Nord, il motore della loro barca, dopo aver tossito per più di dieci minuti, si è finalmente spento. La tensione a bordo è salita subito, in assenza di motore e vento per poter utilizzare le vele, la corrente di prua le avrebbe portate inesorabilmente sulle secche che si estendono in quella zona.Un rapido controllo del circuito del carburante ha evidenziato che il gasolio era pieno d'acqua e il motore, senza decanter, è stato danneggiato fino a fermarsi. Fu chiamato il soccorso, fortunatamente la Guardia Costiera arrivò poco prima che “Hopper Island” finisse su una secca rocciosa. Gli uomini della Guardia Costiera del comando di Cape Hatteras al loro arrivo hanno lanciato una fune di traino verso Hopper Island, che, segnalata, ha deviato la deriva della barca a pochi metri dagli scogli. A poche ore dal traino notturno, la Island Hopper è stata riportata in porto dove la serata si è conclusa con una buona bottiglia di vino californiano.
 

Saverio

Member II
The American Coast Guard 6 miles from Cape Point, North Carolina, intervenes to save a damaged boat, an Ericson 35 ADV Bad experience for the crew of the "Island Hopper" an old Ericson 35. In the late afternoon two days ago during sailing to the United States In the states of Cape Point in the waters of North Carolina, the engine of their boat, after coughing for more than ten minutes, finally stopped. The voltage on board immediately rose, in the absence of engine and wind to be able to use the sails, the bow current would have carried them inexorably on the shallows that extend in that area.A quick check of the fuel circuit showed that the diesel was full of water and the engine, without decanter, was damaged until it stopped. Rescue was called, luckily the Coast Guard arrived just before “Hopper Island” ended up on a rocky shoal. The men of the Coast Guard of the command of Cape Hatteras on their arrival threw a tow rope towards Hopper Island, which, reported, diverted the boat's drift a few meters from the rocks. Within hours of the night tow, the Island Hopper was brought back to port where the evening ended with a good bottle of Californian wine.
 

1911tex

Sustaining Member
I'd say that was a very close call. Sure like to know why there was so much water in the fuel without any fuel/water filters sailing off shore? Or if there was a filter/s, why never routinely checked and drained? Maybe the "0" ring on the fuel cap was missing, damaged? Maybe a bad fuel source? Maybe a good lesson for all of us to pre-flight (oops), have an explicit pre-sail checklist which includes checking filters for water prior to departure. I admit, I do have a checklist for shutdown and leaving the boat for home, but not for pre-sail.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Check List is a darned good idea.
A number of years ago the Admiral took our boat on an overnight cruise to a local park dock with a group of boats piloted by ladies - annual event called, appropriately, the Ladies Cruise. Started many many years before by several gals from our YC. Other gals crew along. Rumor is that they somehow have a good time without us guys. Perhaps. I guess.
:)
I made up a one page "form" for startup and shutdown of the engine. She used it and said it was helpful. Routine stuff to check or turn on or off as the case may be. Luckily it is pretty easy to view the bowl on the Racor filter on our boat.

Closer to home, our YC operates a small (8") cutter head dredge in the winters and we have a laminated sheet aboard for all the parts/places to check on and systems/valves to operate for startup and shutdown each day. As one of the operators I always use it.
Protects the 300K machine and protects me from liability for potentially damaging it. :(

Also: a sailboat I was crewing had to be towed in and expertly parked in a small marina, due to the prop being wrapped up with a crab pot line, off the WA coast. That was some of the best boat handling by the USCG 5 person crew that I had had ever seen.
 
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Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Hmmm. Coast Guard arrived at 1:30 in the morning to find them 6 miles off a shoal.

No one in his right mind approaches the Outer Banks at night under any conditions.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Perhaps the women have more elastic forms of fun in Leucadia, CA, where Paul lives.... ?
:)
 
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