Headsail Furling Cleat Options

Filkee

Member III
A minor source of frustration for years now is how my furling gear is set up. The line runs through a cam cleat just behind where the nonskid ends on the port side and there's no good way to pull on it without putting a lot of friction and stress on the cleat. Well, the thing finally spit out some springs and separated from the deck last week so I have an opportunity to either replace it in kind or change my approach. Can anyone share bright ideas on how their setups work? I kind of wish I had a setup that was like the mainsheet on my C-15 but that would probably be overkill.

cam.jpg
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Hmmm.... probably eight ways to do this, and all will work...
:)
My last block in the line up down the side of the boat thru the sheaves on the stanchions, is a small Harken ratchet block mounted down low on the front leg of the stern pulpit. From there the line goes upward about a foot and cleats to a small Johnson "add a cleat" clamped to the ss tubing. Works well for decades.
 
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Filkee

Member III
Hmmm.... probably eight ways to do this, and all will work...
:)
My last block in the line up down the side of the boat thru the sheaves on the stanchions, is a small Harken ratchet block mounted on low on the front leg of the stern pulpit. From there the line goes upward about a foot and cleats to a small Johnson "add a cleat" clamped to the ss tubing. Works well for decades.
I can almost visualize that...almost...wait, now I can. I may clip a block on the existing setup as a test to see if it can move better.
 
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goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
My furling line is set up exactly as you describe and show your original set-up.

I haven't raced at all, so I try to unload tension from the jib before I furl.
 

Filkee

Member III
My furling line is set up exactly as you describe and show your original set-up.

I haven't raced at all, so I try to unload tension from the jib before I furl.

Likewise, I just always seem to find myself pulling the line at a right angle to the cleat. I think a block will offer me more range of motion.
 

Geoff W.

Makes Up For It With Enthusiasm
Blogs Author
This pic isn't from my boat but is sort of like this:

1601053380493.png

I have a block that leads to a cleat, and the block is able to move more or less to the angle I'm trying to pull from. Sometimes I have to push down on the cam cleat with one hand while pulling up on the line to get it to disengage in heavier wind, but it works very well most of the time.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
This pic isn't from my boat but is sort of like this:

View attachment 35556

I have a block that leads to a cleat, and the block is able to move more or less to the angle I'm trying to pull from. Sometimes I have to push down on the cam cleat with one hand while pulling up on the line to get it to disengage in heavier wind, but it works very well most of the time.
You have combined the cleating with the ratchet sheave. Having the cleating immediately available is a Nice idea, but as you point out, with some other limitations.
Old saying: "within every solution are seeds to new problems" :)
 

Slick470

Member III
I'm thinking through this as well. I added furling at the end of last season and for now, I'm using one of the genoa cleats until I figure out what I want to do. On larger boats that I race on, the manufacturers installed clutches on the deck before the ratchet block. I really like this arrangement vs horn cleats because it provides a very quick and precise way to lock and release the line. So, I'm trying to figure out if I can get this to work on our boat.
 

Kenneth K

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
That camcleat you show must have been original--I have the same one in the same spot. PO installed as ratcheting block with its own camcleat, attached to the stern pulpit like Loren mentioned. The base of the block pivots which allow the you to stand at various places in the cockpit and still get a straight pulling angle on the furling line.

cleat.jpg

cleat2.jpg
 

toddster

Curator of Broken Parts
Blogs Author
I confess that mine usually rides on a secondary winch, which you're not supposed to do, then into a jam-cleat. However, when leaving the boat, I always put it on a deck cleat with a cleat hitch, in case of high winds. Of course, that doesn't help if the line chafes through.

I had a plan to put some sort of organizer and multi-clutch on that quarter 'cause there were a bunch of lines that might use that secondary (furler, boom-brake, etc. though probably not the spin sheet.) Before I got around to it, i forgot what the plan was :rolleyes:
 

p.gazibara

Member III
We use a much more basic arrangement. Minimum cost, minimum fuss.

It can be tough to pull in if the sail is loaded up, but if you turn up and let the sail luff for a bit, it comes in rather easily.

-P
image.jpg
 

Teranodon

Member III
Like others, I have a block attached to a stanchion, which allows me to pull "sideways" on the furling line. The block hangs on a piece of elastic, so that it doesn't damage the gelcoat. I also use a small Spinlock jammer. When I put the boat away, however, I run the line around the fixed sheet cleat, just in case.

Furler1.jpgFurler2.jpg
 

K2MSmith

Member III
My current (unmodified) setup is similar to what you have and I don't really like it. Not a priority for me to change right now but the club boat that I used to lease had the line going through a single clutch on the deck next to cockpit and then through a pulley to change direction on line so you can pull it from the cockpit . I liked this much better than what I have now.
 

Filkee

Member III
Pleased to report that my temporary solution functioned fairly well in 32 knots with gusts to 38 yesterday. This photo of us taken from one of the few other boats fool enough to be on the lake (an Ericson 35): B4585DF6-BBF5-48EF-9C4D-55C488BE21B3.jpeg
 
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