How to set up Reefing lines; Ericson 26-2

acubria

Member II
hello, I have been thinking about this for a while now, and I can not figure out how to set up my reefing lines.
There are two lines coming out of the back of the boom, which I am pretty sure are reefing lines. Then I have 2 sliding block at the end of the boom (one on each side).
  1. How do I incorporate those reef lines that come out of the back of the boom with the sliding block?
  2. Normally a reef line will go from the back of the boom, through a reefing crinkle and then is attached to the boom with a sliding bowline. My sail has a foot-rope and I can not see a good way to attach the reefing line to the boom.
Does anyone have a similar set up? Any ideas ?
I already went sailing with 15 plus knots and had to take the main down since I had no way to control the boat.
I would love to eventually have a single line reefing system, but for now I would babe happy to just have a two line system.
that you Screen Shot 2021-08-25 at 7.56.40 AM.pngScreen Shot 2021-08-25 at 8.22.53 AM.jpg
 

Jerry VB

E32-3 / M-25XP
The reefing line comes out the boom, threads through the visible block, then through the cringle on the sail, and then is tied off to the (a) slider car on the far side of the boom (not visible in the pictures). The two lines are for the first and second reef - the pictures don't show the second reef cringles.

To reef, you drop the sail to the first reef and fasten the luff reefing cringle at the boom. Then pull in the reefing line until the boom and the leech reefing cringle meet. You want the cheek block on the end of the boom to be somewhat aft of the cringle so that it tensions the foot of the (reefed) sail.
 

KS Dave

Member III
Blogs Author
My mainsail was down when I took this picture, but the way my reefing is setup is the line comes out of the end of the boom, through the block, up through cringle on the sail, then goes through the little metal ring next to the block on the opposite side with a knot to hold it in place. That provides the resistance when you pull the line.

ReefingBlocks.jpg

So, specifically, the white/green line (that you can see on the other side) would attach to the ring I've pointed to. The white/blue would attach on the opposite side. Does that make sense?

Pretty sure @Brad Johnson has both an outhaul and downhaul for his reefing setup that runs to the cockpit. Check out this thread for some pictures: https://ericsonyachts.org/ie/threads/e26-2-dodger.18986/ He might have some more thoughts on this matter, too.
 
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vasuvius

Member II
I just went through this recently.

My details and pics here. I can take more pics later this evening. If you'd like to talk through this, please PM me. It might be good to talk as we're kinda going through some of the same things on the same boat :)


There's more pics on the Dodger thread that KS Dave posted.
 

Brad Johnson

Member III
I do not have a down haul set up running to the cockpit, I once was thinking of a single line reefing system but was concerned about the amount of line that would meet to be cranked in
 

vasuvius

Member II
pics from my E26-2 after I refit the reefing lines. the spec calls for 3/8" but I used 8mm which is 1mm shy of the spec.

Reefing lines coming out of the boom. Top view and back bottom view : the center with the steel cable is the outhaul. The starboard side line (left in the first pic with fig 8 stopper) is 2nd reef and the port line is 1st reef.
IMG_0362.jpgIMG_0367.jpg

the lines coming out at the gooseneck : center is outhaul, port side line is 1st reef and starboard side line is 2nd reef. the 2 reefing lines are led down to blocks at bottom of mast - this leaves the clutches free and open
IMG_0363.jpg

IMG_0364.jpg

reefing lines come up thru blocks to cleats on the side of the mast: this allows me to pull the reefing line to get a tight foot and leach when reefed. The lines are long enough that I could lead them
IMG_0365.jpg

I've tested the reefing system a couple times so far and it's worked well for me.
 

acubria

Member II
My mainsail was down when I took this picture, but the way my reefing is setup is the line comes out of the end of the boom, through the block, up through cringle on the sail, then goes through the little metal ring next to the block on the opposite side with a knot to hold it in place. That provides the resistance when you pull the line.

View attachment 40022

So, specifically, the white/green line (that you can see on the other side) would attach to the ring I've pointed to. The white/blue would attach on the opposite side. Does that make sense?

Pretty sure @Brad Johnson has both an outhaul and downhaul for his reefing setup that runs to the cockpit. Check out this thread for some pictures: https://ericsonyachts.org/ie/threads/e26-2-dodger.18986/ He might have some more thoughts on this matter, too.
Hi, I see in your photos that at the end of the boom you have 2 metal cables: one is the outh
My mainsail was down when I took this picture, but the way my reefing is setup is the line comes out of the end of the boom, through the block, up through cringle on the sail, then goes through the little metal ring next to the block on the opposite side with a knot to hold it in place. That provides the resistance when you pull the line.

View attachment 40022

So, specifically, the white/green line (that you can see on the other side) would attach to the ring I've pointed to. The white/blue would attach on the opposite side. Does that make sense?

Pretty sure @Brad Johnson has both an outhaul and downhaul for his reefing setup that runs to the cockpit. Check out this thread for some pictures: https://ericsonyachts.org/ie/threads/e26-2-dodger.18986/ He might have some more thoughts on this matter, too.
hi, I see in your photo that at the end of the boom you have 2 metal cables: one is the outhaul ; is the other attached to the topping lift ? And does this 2nd cable lead to the gooseneck and is it adjustable there ? I always thought I only had one metal cable at the end of my boom, but upon inspecting the inside I f my boom with a flashlight , I see another metal cable inside, abandoned , just seating there…. I tried pulling it out with a wire but could not get it out on my first try….
 

goldenstate

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
hi, I see in your photo that at the end of the boom you have 2 metal cables: one is the outhaul ; is the other attached to the topping lift ? And does this 2nd cable lead to the gooseneck and is it adjustable there ? I always thought I only had one metal cable at the end of my boom, but upon inspecting the inside I f my boom with a flashlight , I see another metal cable inside, abandoned , just seating there…. I tried pulling it out with a wire but could not get it out on my first try….
My Kenyon boom works as you described - two cables at the back, one is outhaul, one is boom topping lift. The SS cable topping lift is spliced to a rope that exits the boom near the gooseneck on the port side.

You may be able to remove the boom from the boat and pull the forward and aft caps and be able to see more.
 

KS Dave

Member III
Blogs Author
hi, I see in your photo that at the end of the boom you have 2 metal cables: one is the outhaul ; is the other attached to the topping lift ? And does this 2nd cable lead to the gooseneck and is it adjustable there ? I always thought I only had one metal cable at the end of my boom, but upon inspecting the inside I f my boom with a flashlight , I see another metal cable inside, abandoned , just seating there…. I tried pulling it out with a wire but could not get it out on my first try….
Apologies, Arturo - I thought I had replied. Tom nailed it. One is the outhaul and the other is the topping lift. Mine is that same as he described.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
To work on the boom, connect the main halyard to a balance point on the boom. Mainsail can remain on the boom.

Disconnect the gooseneck from the mast fitting. Allow the boom to swing forward some and hang free by the halyard. The end of the boom can rest in the cockpit, or be suspended by a temporary bridle of the topping lift.

Remove the end caps, which is usually easy.

If necessary, pull out the entire inside cascade of blocks and lines for topping lift , outhaul and reef lines. The purchases are connected to a through bolt on the boom just aft of the gooseneck. Simply remove the through bolt.

Sender lines can be connected to existing outhaul and topping lift if the lines are to be reused (otherwise the lines will disappear through their exit ports on the boom).

Examine the withdrawn blocks and purchases for fouls or jams and to insure integrity. (the lines and blocks are leads inside are often tangled after many years of neglect.

The original Kenyon topping lift has a steel wire bridle through the boom-end sheave connecting the topping lift to the internal control lines. This steel bridle can be eliminated if replacing the topping lift with Spectra. A Spectra soft shackle can be used for the outer connection of topping lift to internal Spectra section.

To snake new lines through the boom use a fish tape.

Observe the lead of the reef lines over (or under) the through bolt near the gooseneck. The reef lines pass the through bolt on their way to making a 90-degree turn via the small sheaves in the Kenyon gooseneck. Lead the reef lines over (or under) the through bolt such that the least friction occurs.

Scratches on a painted boom can be easily repaired with hardware store spray paint.
 
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