Installing Refrigerator Kit in E34-2 Galley.

JSM

Member III
Just purchased a Norcold SCQT4408 L kit and want to install it in the galley ice box on my 34-2. I need to run both AC and DC wiring from the panel to the galley. Am I better off running the wire thru the headliner or going under the sole (my sole is only screwed down). Looks like I'm going to install the compressor in the compartment where the swing out garbage bin now resides.
Would appreciate any tips from anyone who has attempted this operation.
Thanks
 

HerbertFriedman

Member III
My fridge was installed either by a PO or the factory but the compressor for the (port) fridge lives just forward of the galley bulkhead just under under the settee seat. Putting the compressor under the sink makes access to all those thru hull fittings very difficult. I also have a freezer unit just aft of the nav table and that compressor lives in the starboard cockpit lazarette just forward of the holding tank. That compressor no longer works and I just use the (freezer) space for dry food storage.
 

JSM

Member III
Thanks Herbert. Where I'm putting the compressor is in a separate compartment that is now occupied by a fold out trash bin.
 

EGregerson

Member III
I would go under the sole ; if it's just screwed down. There are already 'places' for wires from the panel to the bilge; eg bilge pump, ant cable. question: does having the compressor in the galley generate a lot of heat?
 

JSM

Member III
Did some pre op exploration and removed the tilt out trash bin the other day. There is a surprising amount of space behind it. I also plan on making an opening in the plywood panel that seperates the galley drawers from the trash bin to facilitate airflow and possibly adding a louvered vent in the cabinet as well.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
It's a good idea to plan for air circulation thru the compartment with the little compressor, radiator, and fan on-a-chasis.
Ours gets slightly warm, but not hot. We added a vent to allow air flow freely from one side of the galley module to the other.
i.e. you would no way want it inside a closed compartment with stagnant air.
 

supersailor

Contributing Partner
I installed mine under the sink right next to the icebox wall. I didn't think the little area where the tilt out bin is had enough ventilation. Like Loren I added a teak vent in the upper side of the galley wall just above the compressor. The noise produced by the compressor is barely noticeable. If I put the compressor in that compartment to the left of the icebox, I think I would add a little ventilation fan and two vents.

I turned the icebox next to the nav table into a freezer. Cruising got a lot better!
 

JSM

Member III
Thanks All. The compressor fit nicely into the area that the trash bin occupied. Unit is running whisper quiet and seems to be getting enough ventilation. Pure joy to arrive at the boat and have frosty beer waiting !
 

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RaymondS

Junior Member
Just purchased a Norcold SCQT4408 L kit and want to install it in the galley ice box on my 34-2. I need to run both AC and DC wiring from the panel to the galley. Am I better off running the wire thru the headliner or going under the sole (my sole is only screwed down). Looks like I'm going to install the compressor in the compartment where the swing out garbage bin now resides.
Would appreciate any tips from anyone who has attempted this operation.
Thanks
Do you have pictures. The E35-3 has wiring for a refrigerator on the AC side. I have a neighbor who has an E38 and his frig is an old Adler-Barbour. Yes the compressor resides in the compartment you describe. The frig you bought runs on both AC and DC? I thought only AC. How many amps does it draw?
 

JSM

Member III
The unit I installed is a Norcold SCQT 4408 L. It runs on both AC and DC. I have a Refrigerator switch on the DC side and wired the AC side to the spare breaker on the AC panel. When we're out sailing I run it on 12V (or not) and back at the dock it converts to 110V as soon as the shore power is plugged in. Not sure how many amps it draws but I believe I read 3.5 somewhere

 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
My electrician says that operating refrigeration 24/7 on DC power while in the slip--the shore power constantly recharging the batteries--does no harm, and that an AC refrigerator option is therefore unnecessary.

Objections to this opinion would be useful.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
My electrician says that operating refrigeration 24/7 on DC power while in the slip--the shore power constantly recharging the batteries--does no harm, and that an AC refrigerator option is therefore unnecessary.

Objections to this opinion would be useful.
We have been running our 12 volt DC fridge 24/7 at the slip (and under way) for over 15 years with no problems. This also avoids the complication of dual voltage supply complexity.
I agree with Christian and his electrician.
Altho like so many boating questions there are probably several 'right' answers.
 

footrope

Contributing Partner
Blogs Author
My electrician says that operating refrigeration 24/7 on DC power while in the slip--the shore power constantly recharging the batteries--does no harm, and that an AC refrigerator option is therefore unnecessary.

Objections to this opinion would be useful.
That's the way I run my Adler Barbour 12V fridge in the summer cruising months. I don't leave it on all year at the dock because of the possibility of AC (shore) power outages. It draws about 5.5A. Depleting batteries below the recommended 50% level is not a good idea. I check in on the boat at least weekly.
 
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