limit of positive stability of Ericson34-200 ? Ventilation ?

paul k

Junior Member
hi - i am interested in this boat. Anyone know her LPS ? also, noticed no deck dorades. How is this boat vented when underway or unattended on a mooring ?

tx Paul
 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
Hi Paul,

There is a 34-2 manual in the "Resources" section you can check out.

My 32-200 is very similar in layout. Underway or unattended on a mooring one could open the operable Lewmar ports in the cabin house or the hinged hatches in the cabin top roof for air-flow.

If you open up the main cabin hatch while moving the hatch cover works like a hood scoop and fires the air through. This would not be ideal in wet conditions. I have also seen hatches with little fans installed in the lens.

Tom
 

wynkoop

Member III
I doubt you will find any stability and trim information. When I bought Silver Maiden in the early 1980's I dug up Bruce King's phone number and gave him a ring looking for stability and trim info. Having just spent 4 years learning Naval Arch, cargo stowage, stability and trim I figured every vessel came with stability and trim tables.

Mr. King was very kind in speaking to me, he answered several questions for me, including why the 27 had the Palmer P60. The answer was that was the smallest inboard available at the time. He said the 27 it needed less than 1/2 the 25 HP.

He also said no one ever produced stability and trim info for small yachts.
 

Teranodon

Member III
I don't know the direct answer to your question. But these popular boats have been around for over 30 years. If there was a stability problem, I think we would know about it.

I love my E34. For the money, and in comparison with other popular brands, it's a great racer/cruiser. As with all boats of this type and age, the most important consideration when purchasing is the state of the particular boat. A thorough survey is a must, but you probably know that.
 

wynkoop

Member III
Stefan stability and trim charts tell you how the vessel will trim adding weight fore or aft of the center of floatation and will tell you how the stability will change depending on where things are loaded on the vessel and even how much water and fuel you have ( free surface area of liquids lower the stability).

So it is not about does the vessel have good stability in the unloaded factory condition, perhaps with fuel and h2o, but rather what will be the effect if I load 1000 lbs of supplies this way or that way.

For my part I would love to know the Moment To Trim One Inch (MTI) because even with nothing in the lazzerette, empty fuel tank and the 400+lb palmer swapped out for the 120Lb Yanmar my boat was still down by the stern.
 

Teranodon

Member III
Stefan stability and trim charts tell you how the vessel will trim adding weight fore or aft of the center of floatation ....
I can see that you are in earnest and that you know far more than I. Still, I have a suggestion. Rather than searching for the official value of this important parameter, how about adopting an empirical approach? Using the good offices of this forum, a suitable E34 could be located. I would certainly make mine available. Then a person of known weight could be asked to stand at the bow, transom or next to the chainplates. A measurement of the change in flotation level would not be hard, I think.
 

Filkee

Member III
One of the first things I did when I adopted Aylwin was install two solar fans from Marinco. They crank away 24-7 and don’t leak excessively if installed properly. One is in the head, so the bad air is always going up the chimney and the other is above the galley stove which pleases the Admiral on a hot summer day. Once you take a hole saw to your cabin trunk you will feel a real sense of ownership.
 

wynkoop

Member III
Stefan the your approach will yield some information that may be of use, but without knowing where the CG and CB locations of the unalden vessel one really can make no calculations or predictions about stability.

In a similar vein one can put a weight on the bow and see how much the bow goes down, then do the same on the stern, but with no idea where the CB is located one can not determine the MTI.

We have to just accept that yacht designers do not provide useful stability and trim data with their designs. I suspect given the drawings and if I dove back into my text books from 40+ years ago I might be able to do up a set of stability and trim tables, but the more practical way of dealing with stability and trim on our little boats is to presume the unalden vessel has enough stability for our purposes and when we load her load her evenly and low.

I have had Silver Maiden with her rail so far submerged that water poured into the cockpit and she still righted herself. Good job I got the hatch boards in before things got that bad or I might have taken too much water to survive.
 

Tom Metzger

Sustaining Partner
also, noticed no deck dorades. How is this boat vented when underway or unattended on a mooring ?
The three Lewmar deck hatches have vent positions which I always used, both summer and uncovered north country snowy winter. They proved adequate for unattended ventilation. Onboard I preferred to use a hatch tent over the forward hatch during inclement weather at anchor or at the dock. Underway, conditions dictate what can be open.

During the sailing season I usually kept the head portlight open with a tight mesh screen in it to provide privacy at the dock and to keep out most rain.

Dorades are great, but there have been a large number of sailboats built with poorly designed dorade boxes that have leaked and destroyed interior bulkheads.
 

paul k

Junior Member
HI All - tx for helpful comments. Now i need to find a good 34-200 in New England. More later i am sure. I know what it is like cutting into your boat...
 
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