Longest Original Ericson Owner...

kapnkd

kapnkd
From information over the years and especially on the EYO site, it was learned some time back that I was basically the SECOND longest ORIGINAL OWNER of an Ericson Yacht. (Mine since ‘73.)

QUITE the honor to say the least and MORE SO ironically to know THE longer original owner was but within 25 miles of me at the Monroe Boat Club here in MI!

Although we have (regretfully) never met, I have seen his Ericson at their club when visiting on cruises and co-sponsored racing activities with our two clubs.

Now, ..I am hearing that I, with sad regrets, may have just become THE longest ORIGINAL Ericson owner on record as his boat has been sold and again offered for sale. (???)

I was sent this today, which would kind of confirm it all - at least for an E-32 at any rate — for us LONG TIME original Ericson owners.
BD114163-6CF7-4176-8CA0-D76C2EB38759.png

Interested to know - Who else out there has bought, loved and owned an Ericson along with me for a long time?????

Darn!!! ...All this REALLY means is I’m getting REALLY old along with our boat!! ;)
 
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Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
From the comments seen around here for the last 20 years I suspect that Ericson owners tend to keep their boats a long time.
We are not even close to you in longevity, but did buy our boat (from the first owner) in 1994.
Perhaps our boats help to "keep us young" (well, young at heart... anyway!)
:egrin:
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
From the comments seen around here for the last 20 years I suspect that Ericson owners tend to keep their boats a long time.
We are not even close to you in longevity, but did buy our boat (from the first owner) in 1994.
Perhaps our boats help to "keep us young" (well, young at heart... anyway!)
:egrin:
Hey Loren!

Amen! ...That they do and have done.

Pride of ownership of “A Proper Yacht” as the old cliche is what I have always felt I have owned with pride.

No doubt, it is the same mantra for so many of us other Ericson owners regardless of the length of ownership.

I simply overbought size wise back in the day while in pursuit of a 27. We grew into her quickly and later realized she was still THE perfect size for OUR family needs and purposes over the many years of ownership.

...So many sailing friends of mine moved up in size and then later moved back down in later years for multiple rational reasons.

Looking back, ...the E-35-III would have been an even more excellent and PERFECT boat. Regardless, at my now older age, our old 32 fits like a comfortable old soft and well worn glove! Still easy to handle for the wife and I, not to mention,
care for maintenance wise.

Besides, although in reality, an inanimate object, ...IT IS FAMILY to us after all these years. She’s still a keeper with a heart and soul that has given us SO MANY cherished memories of fun, excitement, adventure and kinship.

She was a VERY integral part of shaping my son’s life with his own abilities in self confidence, leadership, communications and relating to others than his age group with the common denominator of sailing as an equal.

ALL this from one GREAT boat!!!
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
I just bought an 1972 Ericson 27 from the original owner.
Congratulations and welcome to the EYO site!!

The 27 was what I was looking for in 72 as a step up from my Catalina 22.

By the advertisements I was really anxious to see one. ...Then in late 72 early 73 the only Ericson dealer in FL only had a 32 on hand.

I saw the split cockpit layout and my heart skipped many beats! THEN sliding the companion way open, it was an instant love affair that never ended after all these years.

Had I seen the then new 27...it may have also been the same given the boat’s quality and attention to use of interior woods and detailing.

That you also just purchased from another original owner of such duration certainly speaks to the satisfaction enjoyed by Ericson owners!

Anxious to hear MORE about your vessel, location and history!! Please DO tell us MORE!! :egrin:
 

gabriel

Member III
@kapnkd

Out of curiosity, how many times have you changed the standing rigging in all these years?

Any moments with the boat that particularly stand out that you may want to share? Worst weather shes been in? Ever been close to going down? Hurricane Andrew?
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
@kapnkd

Out of curiosity, how many times have you changed the standing rigging in all these years?

Any moments with the boat that particularly stand out that you may want to share? Worst weather shes been in? Ever been close to going down? Hurricane Andrew?

OH BOY!!
...Let's see IF I can shed some light on some of your great questions.

...If memory serves me, we've changed the head stay 3 times over these many years, the back stay 2 times and shrouds (uppers/lowers) once. Now living in a fresh water area plus actually removing our mast at end of season has allowed us to carefully inspect all critical components easily. (I actually oversized the head and back stays early on thinking it prudent to strengthen the standing rigging.)

Chain plates and surrounding bulkhead areas were my/our biggest rigging concern for us. New chain plates were installed when we started our total re-fit close to (YIKES!) 9 years ago. We also had larger custom chain plate covers designed/made by Garhauer to better prevent any water intrusion into deck chain plate areas. ...I/we hope to better document our "Never Ending Project" into chronicled segments and then post them for everyone at EYO as a "Been There Done It" advice (and sympathy) post.

My favorite times have certainly been our many trips to the Bahamas and especially cruising the Exuma Chain back before it had become so popular and now VERY crowded.

On one particular crossing coming back to Miami from Bimini in 12' to 15' rollers was an incredible ride! The boat actually rode very comfortably (like a horse going from his/her trot to a smooth gallop.) A friend of mine with his Irwin 30 was also off to starboard. With waves between us - we could only see the very tops of each other's sails. The sun and wind was at our backs and as the huge waves approached - we could see the sunlight shine through the waves creating the most beautiful dancing shades of turquoise I have EVER seen! ...The color(s) actually looked alive as each sliver contrasted so incredibly with the deep Indigo Blue of the Gulf Stream.

On another trip coming back from the Dry Tortugas (West of Key West), I was single handing and got caught in a fierce fast approaching storm. I opted for taking the main down, and sailing only with my mule (130) jib. The boat did very well again but I did have to let the head sail flog a few times. Rain was so intense at times, I could barely see but a few yards in front of the bow! ...Worst part, I was in a narrow channel between the keys and a shallow reef to my South as I headed East. There were markers but far between and NOT visible at all in the rain. I relied on my, then analog Pierce-Simpson depth finder as a means of staying in that channel which worked out fine for me.

Considering I was single-handing, it was the only time I had momentary concerns for myself and the boat. (Not so much the boat - but a failure on my part without assistance to overcome.) There was no panic (no time for it) and again the boat was as capable and unnerved as ever.

...Later that evening at anchor, rightfully - with OVERSIZED cocktail and snacks at hand, I relaxed in the cockpit, reflected back on it all to then paint a water color of the day's incredible storm and it's approach. (included below) - not as easy to paint at anchor so forgive me if it seems somewhat amateurish.
Tortugas Storm.jpg

All in all....as much as I enjoyed testing my abilities - the BEST of times - have been with family and/or friends on board sharing in the adventures be it racing or cruising. I was lucky enough to share and bond also with my father and even grandfather back on my Catalina 22 and also with our Ericson. Later with my son, who literally grew up on "CaryOn" he got into racing and we've had some GREAT race moments! For crew, I chose his young friends over the more experienced adults available. On the starting line, others first chuckled, "Here comes that Ericson". BUT as time went on, we got her bottom 'Baby Butt Smooth', added Mylar sails and other go-fast goodies to hear them then say.."Hear comes that DAMN Ericson! My son and his friends STILL race together today and as young adults have a formidable reputation on the water! They've garnered the Lake Erie "Boat of the Year Award" a couple times now on his own boat (S2 7.9).

MOST INCREDIBLE AND MEMORABLE....We as father and son truly bonded strongly thanks to our boat and I am so grateful for EVERY second of time we get to share together!

Lastly, I was very very lucky when living in Miami. there was one hurricane in the mid 70's (name forgotten). I moved the boat from Watson Island WAY UP the Miami River in back of a friends house along with several other sailboats and tied them off like files caught in a monstorous spider web of anchor lines and anything we could find/use! There was no damage to any of the boats and we were ALL at his house at the ready for any needed response.

One other time when living in Sarasota, the "No Name Storm" came through while my boat was at Marina Jacks. Luckily she endured with NO damage.
 

gabriel

Member III
wow thats very interesting. thank you!

I often ask the same questions about my boat but since i am third owner and the original owner passed, i’ll always have to leave it to the imagination.

have a nice weekend and thanks again for sharing.
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
wow thats very interesting. thank you!

I often ask the same questions about my boat but since i am third owner and the original owner passed, i’ll always have to leave it to the imagination.

have a nice weekend and thanks again for sharing.
More than welcome!! ...YOU, in VERY short order, will also be creating your own E-27 adventures, and most importantly, memories.

Most certainly, seek to increase your knowledge and experience as a competent sailor - learning and sharing your own gained knowledge with others. (THAT is what this site is all about,)

Looking forward to YOUR posts be it maintenance, restorations or just having FUN!!

Keep us ALL posted!!!
 

1911tex

Member III
kapnkd said:
"A friend of mine with his Irwin 30 was also off to starboard. With waves between us - we could only see the very tops of each other's sails. The sun and wind was at our backs and as the huge waves approached - we could see the sunlight shine through the waves creating the most beautiful dancing shades of turquoise I have EVER seen! ...The color(s) actually looked alive as each sliver contrasted so incredibly with the deep Indigo Blue of the Gulf Stream."

Beautiful! Very well written>>> Reading it seemed like I was there!
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
kapnkd said:
"A friend of mine with his Irwin 30 was also off to starboard. With waves between us - we could only see the very tops of each other's sails. The sun and wind was at our backs and as the huge waves approached - we could see the sunlight shine through the waves creating the most beautiful dancing shades of turquoise I have EVER seen! ...The color(s) actually looked alive as each sliver contrasted so incredibly with the deep Indigo Blue of the Gulf Stream."

Beautiful! Very well written>>> Reading it seemed like I was there!
Thanks! This occurred back in the mid/late 70’s yet today is as vivid in my mind as it was at that moment.

...There’s something amazing and awakening about being off shore with no land in sight. One’s senses to the total beauty of nature are significantly heightened by the lack of man made distractions.
 

Tin Kicker

Sustaining Member
Moderator
...There’s something amazing and awakening about being off shore with no land in sight. One’s senses to the total beauty of nature are significantly heightened by the lack of man made distractions.
On a smaller boat that sure is the truth! It's the water version of being at great heights, when ALL your senses are on hyper alert.

Thanks for sharing the great artwork too!
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Thanks! This occurred back in the mid/late 70’s yet today is as vivid in my mind as it was at that moment.

...There’s something amazing and awakening about being off shore with no land in sight. One’s senses to the total beauty of nature are significantly heightened by the lack of man made distractions.
That's a real Good Observation. While I have sometimes been uncomfortable and occasionally frightened when offshore, I really do love the solitude of the endless waves. OK, hackneyed reference, but still....... :)

There is 'nothing to see', but nonetheless it's a sensory delight.
That being said, avoid the head compartment when there is an occasional/unpredictable 5' cross sea running!
:(
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
On a smaller boat that sure is the truth! It's the water version of being at great heights, when ALL your senses are on hyper alert.

Thanks for sharing the great artwork too!
Amen!! I can TOTALLY appreciate what you say!!

...My very first Gulf Stream crossing was made in my brand new Catalina 22. (Looking back now, at then age 27 it was NOT the smartest of decisions.)

We started for Bimini from Miami but winds were not favorable so opted for a faster beam reach to West End or Freeport, due East of Palm Beach. (The waters were more than kind with minimal waves - which was my biggest worry.)

Some 130 something miles later and more than 28 hours of nonstop sailing, we finally pulled into Freeport at 3 or 4 in the morning completely exhausted.

Our little Catalina did well on the complete and proudly got us safely through a severe storm when later crossing back down to Bimini from Freeport. We tied anything and everything up that might move - even winches ;-)) I think - went into the cabin, put the hatch boards in and rode it out like a little cork bobbing in 8 to 10’ Seas.

Never saw so much lighting in my life!! ...It was like being in a light bulb with someone rapidly flipping the switch up & down! I disconnected the VHF antenna cable and laid the end close to the centerboard only to see a blue colored spark reach out and grab the cable with a continuous hissing sound.

Storm lasted what seemed like forever but afterwards winds dropped, waves calmed and on we went to Bimini.

It was after this episode I was more than determined to get a bigger boat as Bahamas cruising was just to enticing to give up.

Thanks for the compliment on my artwork. I love the water, boats, lighthouses and weather worn shacks. Watercolors done on the boat are extra fun. ...Done like a game of golf - least number of strokes WINS!

7404A004-F310-4C42-950A-57F6BA34F3DF.jpeg
 
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