Need ideas on paint for my boat

Wolfy189

Member I
So heres the deal. My E29is a 1972. I spent 6+ hours yesterday on my knees scrubbing and at best my topside still looks dingy : ( I've checked before into painting and get numbers back from $6k to $14k. I simply can't afford that with kids in college and private school. I'm beyond blessed to be sailing at all. I got the boat 4 years ago for $2k (a steal) and it was fully functional. I put on some sailing electronics last year and really need to update the genoa and main. I hope to get both sails for less than $3k. What I can afford is paint and my labor. Is there a paint that will work for the topside on top of the existing paint? I don't expect to be selling or upgrading anytime soon. And I won't be freaked out that it isn't pristine on close inspection. I just want it to be brighter than it is which will in and of itself add greatly to my wife's sailing pleasure. I could look past that but it bugs her every time she comes aboard.

Anybody got any help for this cash strapped sailor?
 

Shelman

Member III
Blogs Author
Has the deck been painted before, or is it still the factory original gel-coat?
My boat was badly oxidized when I bought it and required wet sanding the entire boat, followed by buffing and then waxing. If you are dealing with gel-coat this may be an option for you as well.
 

footrope

Contributing Partner
Blogs Author
I have a 1980 with very dingy decks from the dirt that gets into the gelcoat. I was told by a painter at the yard that diluted vinegar can be used to lighten old gelcoat. I can't check on this until Tuesday. It is something I have considered. I just paid to have the non-skid renewed and it is great looking, which just makes the difference even greater. I will probably buff the smooth areas of the deck just before we splash, too.

I'll post again next week about the vinegar technique.
 

Wolfy189

Member I
painting ideas

I would think it is original gel coat. There is a fair bit of "micro" cracking with some areas where the gelcoat has flaked away entirely on the nonskid surfaces. The hull should respond pretty well to to the wet sanding. What grit paper did you use?






Has the deck been painted before, or is it still the factory original gel-coat?
My boat was badly oxidized when I bought it and required wet sanding the entire boat, followed by buffing and then waxing. If you are dealing with gel-coat this may be an option for you as well.
 

Wolfy189

Member I
painting ideas

Thanks for the suggestion


I have a 1980 with very dingy decks from the dirt that gets into the gelcoat. I was told by a painter at the yard that diluted vinegar can be used to lighten old gelcoat. I can't check on this until Tuesday. It is something I have considered. I just paid to have the non-skid renewed and it is great looking, which just makes the difference even greater. I will probably buff the smooth areas of the deck just before we splash, too.

I'll post again next week about the vinegar technique.
 

Keith Parcells

Sustaining Member
Interlux Brightside is a good one part polyurethane paint. It is pretty easy to apply well with roll and tip technique, AFAIK. West Marine has their own brand of topside paint also.

Or Awlgrip which is a two part paint, harder to use and more toxic. I think it requires use of a respirator for application. It might leave a prettier finish.

There are probably other paints too.
 

Carefree Sailor

Member II
Non-skid Renewed

I have a 1980 with very dingy decks from the dirt that gets into the gelcoat. I was told by a painter at the yard that diluted vinegar can be used to lighten old gelcoat. I can't check on this until Tuesday. It is something I have considered. I just paid to have the non-skid renewed and it is great looking, which just makes the difference even greater. I will probably buff the smooth areas of the deck just before we splash, too.

I'll post again next week about the vinegar technique.
Hi Craig,

My non-skid could use a renewal; thus, I would be interested to hear more about what you had done with it. Is it still the original pyramid shaped pattern? What paint did you use? Was it repainted the original beige color? If so, what is the name of the color? I've had trouble finding Interlux paint chips that match. Was a non-skid additive used in the paint?
 
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Wolfy189

Member I
Topside paint ideas

Thanks Keith I like the one application technique! That's definitely my preference. And whatever I do is going to improve looks considerably : )


Interlux Brightside is a good one part polyurethane paint. It is pretty easy to apply well with roll and tip technique, AFAIK. West Marine has their own brand of topside paint also.

Or Awlgrip which is a two part paint, harder to use and more toxic. I think it requires use of a respirator for application. It might leave a prettier finish.

There are probably other paints too.
 

Mark F

Contributing Partner
Blogs Author
Hi Wolfy189,

Do you have any photos of the deck? I think it is unusual for gel-coat flake off. it sounds more like peeling paint. if it is paint you will want to remove as much you can before (re)painting.
 

McGinnis

Member II
Deck painting

I refinished the deck of our 38, it's not so bad of a job really.

First, determine what kind of coating you have down already. I used a little pool of MEK under a piece of plastic taped to the deck. If the paint starts to go, it's one part; if nothing happens, lucky you! We had two part paint on our boat.

Interlux Brightside is an appropriate one part paint for non-skid deck surfaces. I quite enjoy being able to add my own preference of non-skid medium. A flattening agent to take the shine out will save your eyeballs.

One part paints generally need to be re-done more often than their two-part counterparts. I've heard every 5 years for one, 10 years for two. Results may vary.

REMEMBER!! You can't use a two-part paint over a one part paint but you can (don't know why you would) use a one-part over a two-part.

6 layers of Interlux Perfection was what we used with a 1/1 mix with the two part flattening agent on top of 4 layers of epoxy primekote. Tough as nails and user friendly.

You can see the grey color first picture which was WAY hot in the sun. Painted Oyster white with Intergrip sprinkled on top= heaven.

SAM_0206.jpgSAM_0207.jpgSAM_0211.jpg.
 

Shelman

Member III
Blogs Author
Wet-sanding

As I recall I used 800 grit paper for most of it and 600 followed by 800 on the really bad parts. Then a good buff job then several coats of wax. I didn't buff the non skid though because I didn't want to make it slippery. Nothing worse than a wet and freshly waxed deck to land you on your backside.
 

footrope

Contributing Partner
Blogs Author
Hi Craig,

My non-skid could use a renewal; thus, I would be interested to hear more about what you had done with it. Is it still the original pyramid shaped pattern? What paint did you use? Was it repainted the original beige color? If so, what is the name of the color? I've had trouble finding Interlux paint chips that match. Was a non-skid additive used in the paint?
George,
I had a non-skid treatment added over the old worn diamond pattern. They washed the deck with Comet cleanser, then painted. It is a heavy paint with "75-25" grit (barefoot friendly) sprinkled on while it cured and then a finish treatment. I used a lighter color - a gray with some yellow. I picked the finish color from an Awl-Grip chip sampler. I'll get the color, a description of the paints, and take some detailed pictures and post them.

Deck_Non-Skid_Detail01.jpg

It looks great and I like the feel, and so does the Admiral.
 
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MAJr

Junior Member
Hi! New owner of '74 E29-2 (tall). I'd like to know whether you think this (see pic) deck peeling is non-skid, paint or other? Any suggestions for remedy? Thanks in advance
 

Attachments

Sailingfun

Member I
I'm in the process to paint my deck with Totalboat, both, deck and antiskid. Easy to work, way more economic that interlux and very good finishing. I decided to sand, prime, and paint in order to secure a good first layer for the paint.
Now... on the next slip, I have a neighbor who is painting the deck with Rustoleum marine paint. He is way more interested in sail the boat rather than spend month after month of painting and maintenance... I love the guy, he didn't know how's paint or even use the boat but he used it.
 

texlan

Member I
Blogs Author
Majr87, that is clearly peeling paint, and an excellent poster child for sanding down or fairing the existing nonskid pattern before painting over it. I have a '71 E29 Tall that I am refitting, and my plan is to aggressively remove the existing nonskid pattern with 50 or 80 grit and then paint with kiwi grip.

Sean
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Does look like paint. Before aggressive sanding, I'd try a soy-gel paint remover on a test area.
 
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Brad Johnson

Member II
I have painted the non skid twice in 30 years both times with Interlux 2 part paint, the only prep I did was scrub deck with bronze wool and an Interlux prep wash. The first job lasted 28 years and wore off , no failures, one coat covered both times . I used a 4' foam hot dog roller, tased edges with 3m fine line. roll in the same direction , used flatten agent 1/1.
 

hanareddy

Member I
I'm in the process to paint my deck with Totalboat, both, deck and antiskid. Easy to work, way more economic that interlux and very good finishing. I decided to sand, prime, and paint in order to secure a good first layer for the paint.
I need to do this, but feel overwhelmed at the thought of removing hardware on the deck. Do you just tape around everything? Also, in spots where there is a chip in the coating, do you first Drexel it out and fill it with gel coat or other filler? Thanks! One more question, how many days does it take you and do all the days need to be rain free? Thanks Again!
 
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