New 32-3 assorted mysteries

Puget sailor

Junior Member
As I continue to explore my new 32-3, I’ve come across a few things I’m curious about.

#1. there is a hockey puck sized disc mounted on the steering quadrant, surrounded by 2 hose clamps. At first I thought perhaps it’s a vibration damper, but upon further contorted examination it appears to be a bump stop for limits of travel. My question is, are the clamps supposed to be there, and is it supposed to be hard as a sea-biscuit, or is it supposed to be firm rubber and it’s just become hard with age? I’m guessing the hose clamps were tacked on to keep it from cracking apart because it got hard with age? And if that is correct, any idea where to get a squishy replacement?

ABB1C3C3-227D-4D98-ADB0-76198EE8D39E.jpeg

Next question, but I think I’ve answered it, what’s the deal with this thing in the aft bilge? It made no sense there until I noticed a spot in the forward galley well that it also fits into. Seems like it’s designed as a sponge and soap tray, but a previous owner decided to shift it to the bilge and added some wood strips in there to hold it. Makes sense, because having it in the galley well wastes a lot of space.

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I found this teak gizmo in a storage area, but I can’t tell if it’s a boat part, maybe an obsolete table for the pedestal, an extra step that goes somewhere, but it seems too flimsy, or what? Anybody got one or seen one? Maybe it’s an accessory to the stern tail mounted force 10 gas grill?
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Also, both of my lifeline stanchions at maximum beam are bent significantly inward. I’m assuming this is not original, it makes it tough to squeeze past the shrouds especially when scrubbing decks. The posts are straight, and the deck is solid, but the bases look distorted, and resealed. The original Genoa used to hang over the rail here according to some old pictures I’ve found, and the new sail sets higher and does not, so I’m guessing these were purposely shifted inward to improve the set of that old sail. If I’m correct, I will want to dismount the bases and fix them or replace. Any good sources for replacement?
662FEBE9-D4A6-44FE-9E3C-5162FB8FF454.jpeg
( both sides have similarly bent stanchion bases)

Bonus picture, not a mystery because the creator labeled it, check out this improvised keel bolt socket! It is possible to just buy these now, even extra deep, but perhaps some time ago it was less easy to find on the internet? It’s made from plates welded around a smaller socket!

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Puget sailor

Junior Member
As I continue to explore my new 32-3, I’ve come across a few things I’m curious about.

#1. there is a hockey puck sized disc mounted on the steering quadrant, surrounded by 2 hose clamps. At first I thought perhaps it’s a vibration damper, but upon further contorted examination it appears to be a bump stop for limits of travel. My question is, are the clamps supposed to be there, and is it supposed to be hard as a sea-biscuit, or is it supposed to be firm rubber and it’s just become hard with age? I’m guessing the hose clamps were tacked on to keep it from cracking apart because it got hard with age? And if that is correct, any idea where to get a squishy replacement?

View attachment 43785

Next question, but I think I’ve answered it, what’s the deal with this thing in the aft bilge? It made no sense there until I noticed a spot in the forward galley well that it also fits into. Seems like it’s designed as a sponge and soap tray, but a previous owner decided to shift it to the bilge and added some wood strips in there to hold it. Makes sense, because having it in the galley well wastes a lot of space.

View attachment 43786
View attachment 43787

I found this teak gizmo in a storage area, but I can’t tell if it’s a boat part, maybe an obsolete table for the pedestal, an extra step that goes somewhere, but it seems too flimsy, or what? Anybody got one or seen one? Maybe it’s an accessory to the stern tail mounted force 10 gas grill?
View attachment 43788

Also, both of my lifeline stanchions at maximum beam are bent significantly inward. I’m assuming this is not original, it makes it tough to squeeze past the shrouds especially when scrubbing decks. The posts are straight, and the deck is solid, but the bases look distorted, and resealed. The original Genoa used to hang over the rail here according to some old pictures I’ve found, and the new sail sets higher and does not, so I’m guessing these were purposely shifted inward to improve the set of that old sail. If I’m correct, I will want to dismount the bases and fix them or replace. Any good sources for replacement?
View attachment 43792
( both sides have similarly bent stanchion bases)

Bonus picture, not a mystery because the creator labeled it, check out this improvised keel bolt socket! It is possible to just buy these now, even extra deep, but perhaps some time ago it was less easy to find on the internet? It’s made from plates welded around a smaller socket!

View attachment 43789
View attachment 43790
I’ll answer one of my own questions, found a picture of the wood step thing and it is indeed a shelf that goes I front of the gas grill. I had never even removed the cover, but when I did I saw holes that seemed designed receive the stainless rods.
12797DA2-E417-4423-AEF7-AE3AA6D3B759.jpeg
 

Bolo

Sustaining Member
I think I can clear up two questions. As for the steering quadrant it appears that there is a very oversized bumper on it and the OEM version dose not have hose clamps holding it on. The original bumper is quite thin in comparison and can be seen in this video (not mine) showing the quadrant turning that I found on this site about a steering issue with the quadrant. :

As for the little double tray you found, I have one on my E32-3 as well and I think it was suppose to be used as a collection point for dust and debris that is swept into it off the cabin sole. I maybe completely wrong about that because I never use it. Might a great place to hid some extra cash? Hope someone else with come up with another explanation.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Hi Bob,
That lead of the cable into the quadrant is not at 90 degrees. Can you remount the turning block a bit higher, maybe be drilling a new higher set of axle holes? It looks like it was built with several holes, but the top one in use is still not high enough. Strictly IMHO.

Same quadrant and cast aluminum stop piece as ours, I should note. Probably the same OEM piece of exhaust hose for a bumper on it, too!
 

Puget sailor

Junior Member
I think I can clear up two questions. As for the steering quadrant it appears that there is a very oversized bumper on it and the OEM version dose not have hose clamps holding it on. The original bumper is quite thin in comparison and can be seen in this video (not mine) showing the quadrant turning that I found on this site about a steering issue with the quadrant. :

As for the little double tray you found, I have one on my E32-3 as well and I think it was suppose to be used as a collection point for dust and debris that is swept into it off the cabin sole. I maybe completely wrong about that because I never use it. Might a great place to hid some extra cash? Hope someone else with come up with another explanation.
Ah, a built in bilge dust bin then? That could be true and clever.

I was just noticing the imperfect steering cable lead angle in that video and mine are the same, even though I have a different turning block system! Mine seems to be the black anodized Yacht Specialties version, I used to have a spare set from a clearance bin back when they went out of business in Seattle decades ago. I was thinking just using a slightly smaller turning block could solve the problem, but it’d have to be quite a lot small, like an inch, and that seems problematic. I was wondering why the quadrant could not just be mounted upside down, since there is plenty of room above it if exposed rudder shaft, the casting only extends in one direction, down. Then add a spacer to constrain the rudder movement so it can’t drop down. But now there is also a rudder angle sensor for the autohelm, so it gets complicated fast, and I think the rudder shaft is drilled through to lock the quadrant and who wants more holes? Maybe a combination of slightly smaller wheel and grind off some of the quadrant metal, but wait: if it ain’t broke, not to fix! Mine has a ton of grease but it’s worked all this time and seems to function just fine. So I’ll avoid messing it up. I also noticed in that video the cable goes alarmingly slack at the extremes, so I should get my kid to run mine through it’s range while I watch to make sure I don’t have that problem. Should be easy to adjust.

I do wonder if the extra large bump stop was added around the existing stop, and squeezed on with those hose clamps, because the angle sensor did not have enough range to follow the quadrant all the way? When I teach kids to sail optis an early lesson is avoid extreme rudder angles, it’s generally not helpful. This thing is already so much more maneuverable than my past full keel boats, I’m happy with it. But I do worry about that bump stop being too stiff to cushion things, so time to see what can be done about that.
Hi Bob,
That lead of the cable into the quadrant is not at 90 degrees. Can you remount the turning block a bit higher, maybe be drilling a new higher set of axle holes? It looks like it was built with several holes, but the top one in use is still not high enough. Strictly IMHO.

Same quadrant and cast aluminum stop piece as ours, I should note. Probably the same OEM piece of exhaust hose for a bumper on it, too!
 

peaman

Member III
The midship stanchions may have been bent inwards by an overly zealous shrink wrap installer. That's what happened to one of mine this past winter. Some who have been told this were skeptical that shrink wrap could create such a force, but a friend in my marina for 20 years says that it happens to several boats every year. I had to remove the stanchion to beat the base plate back into shape before re-bedding with butyl tape. Worst part was that I had to take a razor knife to the headliner vinyl in order to access the nuts on the ends of the stanchion bolts.

Somewhere I read, as Bolo said, that the plastic tray in the aft bilge is a dust pan, which to me is pretty weird. But still, I aspire to having a dusty bilge.
 

windblown

Member III
Ah, a built in bilge dust bin then? That could be true and clever.

I was just noticing the imperfect steering cable lead angle in that video and mine are the same, even though I have a different turning block system! Mine seems to be the black anodized Yacht Specialties version, I used to have a spare set from a clearance bin back when they went out of business in Seattle decades ago. I was thinking just using a slightly smaller turning block could solve the problem, but it’d have to be quite a lot small, like an inch, and that seems problematic. I was wondering why the quadrant could not just be mounted upside down, since there is plenty of room above it if exposed rudder shaft, the casting only extends in one direction, down. Then add a spacer to constrain the rudder movement so it can’t drop down. But now there is also a rudder angle sensor for the autohelm, so it gets complicated fast, and I think the rudder shaft is drilled through to lock the quadrant and who wants more holes? Maybe a combination of slightly smaller wheel and grind off some of the quadrant metal, but wait: if it ain’t broke, not to fix! Mine has a ton of grease but it’s worked all this time and seems to function just fine. So I’ll avoid messing it up. I also noticed in that video the cable goes alarmingly slack at the extremes, so I should get my kid to run mine through it’s range while I watch to make sure I don’t have that problem. Should be easy to adjust.

I do wonder if the extra large bump stop was added around the existing stop, and squeezed on with those hose clamps, because the angle sensor did not have enough range to follow the quadrant all the way? When I teach kids to sail optis an early lesson is avoid extreme rudder angles, it’s generally not helpful. This thing is already so much more maneuverable than my past full keel boats, I’m happy with it. But I do worry about that bump stop being too stiff to cushion things, so time to see what can be done about that.
The aft-bilge dust bin is actually a feature mentioned the original owner’s manual. It’s a handy place to sweep the floor dust into, acting like a dust pan but the sides and compartments make it so much easier to carry up the companionway ladder to empty. We have used it as a quick place to store a wallet or two, once or twice.
 

bigd14

Contributing Partner
Blogs Author
I was just noticing the imperfect steering cable lead angle in that video and mine are the same, even though I have a different turning block system!
Ugh, mine too. I would have to get a slightly smaller diameter bronze pully wheel to get it to align.
 

Kenneth K

1985 32-3, Puget Sound
Blogs Author
( both sides have similarly bent stanchion bases)
Maybe one was bent in a docking mishap. One bent stanchion would be pretty noticeable. With symmetrically bend stanchions, it might appear that they're supposed to be that way.
 

jtsai

Member III
That plastic trey is a dust pan?!!! Too funny, I have been wondering about it for two years.

My midship stanchions are angled inward as well. The base has 5 degree inboard angle as designed.

1659386486999.png
 

bigd14

Contributing Partner
Blogs Author
Hey Puget Sailor, I noticed your boat still has the NavTec turnbuckles which likely means the standing rigging and chainplates have never been replaced. This would be an important item to add to the list of eventual projects. Lots of threads on here about that, including this one:

 

Bolo

Sustaining Member
Hi Bob,
That lead of the cable into the quadrant is not at 90 degrees. Can you remount the turning block a bit higher, maybe be drilling a new higher set of axle holes? It looks like it was built with several holes, but the top one in use is still not high enough. Strictly IMHO.

Same quadrant and cast aluminum stop piece as ours, I should note. Probably the same OEM piece of exhaust hose for a bumper on it, too!
It’s not my boat. I’ll need to check on mine now but I seem to remember it all lining up.
 

Puget sailor

Junior Member
Hey Puget Sailor, I noticed your boat still has the NavTec turnbuckles which likely means the standing rigging and chainplates have never been replaced. This would be an important item to add to the list of eventual projects. Lots of threads on here about that, including this one:

That was my conclusion too, original rig. And replacement is the plan, but I've decided that the purpose of this thing was to get me on the water for once, so I'm going to baby it in Puget Sound within reason this summer, and pull the rig over the winter using my club's dockside crane, so I can pretty much rebuild everything and deal with some bubbles in the mast finish too. Meanwhile, I do not see any of the usual telltale signs of impending doom which I have seen many times on other boats including my own, but not this one, - unexplained rusty bits on fitting or swages, cracks, etc. Not saying I would keep this forever, but it still seems amazingly sound. One possible factor in that, it's always been near Seattle on Puget Sound, and our sailing is not too extreme, and rigs are constantly under fresh water rinse for about 8 months of the year, plus it's generally cool weather, all things in favor of rig life. The thing I worry most about is those mast terminals with that constant elbow strain. I suspect being a double spreader rig helps a bit too, in spreading the load. When I get the standing rigging replaced, some destructive testing of the original seems like an interesting undertaking...
 

Prairie Schooner

Jeff & Donna, new owners 7/21
@ Puget sailor - If you don't mind me piggy-backing on your menagerie of curiosities, I'd like to post this picture of tackle which came with our boat. The previous owner was of 'diminished capacity' and his family didn't know what it was for. It's stumped everyone who's seen it. I roughly estimate 125' of line, maybe more.

mystery tackle 9094.jpg

Any ideas, folks? A little puzzle to go with your Friday cocktail.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
I'd like to post this picture of tackle which came with our boat. The previous owner was of 'diminished capacity' and his family didn't know what it was for. It's stumped everyone who's seen it. I roughly estimate 125' of line, maybe more.
You must have a LifeSling, on your stern rail somewhere.
 

Prairie Schooner

Jeff & Donna, new owners 7/21
We do have a Life Sling. Retrieval tackle kinda makes sense, tho this is very long. Once played out it's still gotta still be 40 feet. Hmmm. When I have time, I'll confirm the length. This was stowed in the locker ahead of the v-berth.
 

Puget sailor

Junior Member
That's what I was thinking, and since my new boat has a lifesling, I decided to surf for good videos on who to use the thing. That line does seem long, but maybe it was just a surplus halyard that was repurposed for this? One thing I noticed in the video, they keep the hoisting tackle in a bag accessible from the cockpit which makes more sense than up in the v-berth area, thought the size of that tackle might be part of the reason.
Anyway, this seems to be a good one, now I need to figure out if I have a tackle, and practice using it with my lifesling. I'm also curios to try the transom boarding ladder while my local water is still warm enough for a swim. My teens have already been using, so I know it's possible to climb out that way, but I would not count on it in a hypothermic state.

Good video on lifesling hosted by John Rousmaniere:
 

Puget sailor

Junior Member
Also found this in the comments of the above video, quite helpful:

Three questions after watching. One I’m not sure what to do with the tackle. Two do I need to do anything with the bitter end of the sling rope? Three is there a recommended way to put the sling away after usage to ensure it’s ready for the next time? Best video on the life sling so far, thanks!

Hi Jay. Point by point: 1) The tackle is an extra accessory. It is to assist with the recovery by giving the hoister mechanical advantage to get the person aboard. How you deploy it on your boat is really a function of your specific rig, but the standard thing is to secure the carabiner end to a bowline loop about 6' from the sling and then secure the non-carabiner end to a halyard and hoist this end several feet above the lifelines. Then take the running part of the line to a winch (using whatever fairlead makes sense if necessary) and hoist. Or just hand over hand the line and get the COB out that way. 2) The bitter end of the lifesling line must be made fast to the boat. Ideally it is made fast to a cleat or some other very stout hardware. If your pushpit is stout you could probably fix it to the pushpit railing (lower is better) but this is less than ideal. The reason you can get away with this is that the load on the bitter end should really be very modest at all times. When you deploy the sling, the load is the drag of the sling through the water. Once you make contact with the victim, the load should no longer be on the bitter end because you are working the line in and so the area under tension gets progressively shorter. 3) I've seen people flake or coil the line and then stuff it into the bag before putting the sling in. My preferred method is to flake the line directly into the bag, hand over hand, working from the bitter end up until I get to the sling. The advantage to doing it this way is that the first flake into the bag is the last flake out of the bag and vice-versa, so the line is all but guaranteed to run clean.
 

peaman

Member III
Anyway, this seems to be a good one, now I need to figure out if I have a tackle, and practice using it with my lifesling.
The tackle is useful for hoisting lots of things. I used mine to remove and replace my galley stove, and I use it regularly to move my dinghy motor to/from dinghy and aft rail mount. Also can lift inflatable (inverted) onto the foredeck for cleaning, etc. As a general-purpose utility tackle, it is sometimes called a "handy billy".
 
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