New Bottom Paint by Petit!!!

kapnkd

kapnkd
Petit, as an Industry leader in the bottom paint industry has just announced a new type of bottom paint for all of us with sensitivities to the smell of chemicals in bottom paint!!!
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Regrettably, it’s that their announcement came out on April Fools Day though!!! But perhaps maybe for the best, as the overwhelming desire to lick this paint is NOT at all advisable!!!!

...WELCOME to April and the fact that another boating season is close at hand!!!
 

Filkee

Member III
This seems as good a place as any to solicit opinions about bottom paint application.

The two inches of white between my boot stripe and bottom paint wind up being just plain gross. Sometimes I swim around and scrub and frighten the children when I come out with red ablative paint dripping off my body.

I have noticed that some people just take the bottom paint right up to the boot stripe. Is this a move that dwells on the thin line between brilliance and stupidity?
 

Afrakes

Sustaining Member
This seems as good a place as any to solicit opinions about bottom paint application.

The two inches of white between my boot stripe and bottom paint wind up being just plain gross. Sometimes I swim around and scrub and frighten the children when I come out with red ablative paint dripping off my body.

I have noticed that some people just take the bottom paint right up to the boot stripe. Is this a move that dwells on the thin line between brilliance and stupidity?
I go for brilliance.
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
Ericsons gain weight the age, like me.

So it's bottom paint up the boot for both of us.

I bought my E32 brand new in ‘73. Living in Miami, the waves from passing boats dirtied and fowled the white strip constantly. On her first haul out and doing my own work (with many then budgeting constraints) I raised the stripe and bottom paint up myself....

And NOW, the REST OF THE STORY!

...Funniest and most memorable part back then was the yard I was in. It was a WAY UP the Miami River yard (Poland’s Marina) that was more a junkyard and akin to a Pirate’s Den of questionable dressed and cigar chomping characters! (By enlarge, they were good down to earth TRUE salt water seasoned sailors as I got know and was actually privileged to interact with!)

...One of them, passing by our boat, ...a rag tagged dressed guy chewing a short cigar in his mouth and can of open paint in hand not to mention beat up worn out old sea captain’s hat at a loose angle on his head, smiled at me and said, “Raising the POT LINE Ehh???!!”

????...Apparently, back then, commercial boats and more were changing their waterlines to reflect and then hide heavier loads of illegal drugs and all!!!

It was indeed a truly interesting and educational few days in that long since forgotten and now sadly lost family owned boatyard! ...I often reflect back on those days of their many wooden boats begging for repair, the distinctive smells of their salt water soaked wood and my imaginary tales they secretly withheld, and not to mention the few incredible individuals I got to meet and interact with as true pieces of the Miami River boating community and history!



Raising my “Pot Line” certainly resolved my dirty waterline issues over these many years, but said memories are much more enduring than my clean white stripe!

Fair Winds and hopefully EQUALLY GREAT MEMORIES to all!!!! ...ARGHHH!!!
 

Filkee

Member III
I bought my E32 brand new in ‘73. Living in Miami, the waves from passing boats dirtied and fowled the white strip constantly. On her first haul out and doing my own work (with many then budgeting constraints) I raised the stripe and bottom paint up myself....

And NOW, the REST OF THE STORY!

...Funniest and most memorable part back then was the yard I was in. It was a WAY UP the Miami River yard (Poland’s Marina) that was more a junkyard and akin to a Pirate’s Den of questionable dressed and cigar chomping characters! (By enlarge, they were good down to earth TRUE salt water seasoned sailors as I got know and was actually privileged to interact with!)

...One of them, passing by our boat, ...a rag tagged dressed guy chewing a short cigar in his mouth and can of open paint in hand not to mention beat up worn out old sea captain’s hat at a loose angle on his head, smiled at me and said, “Raising the POT LINE Ehh???!!”

????...Apparently, back then, commercial boats and more were changing their waterlines to reflect and then hide heavier loads of illegal drugs and all!!!

It was indeed a truly interesting and educational few days in that long since forgotten and now sadly lost family owned boatyard! ...I often reflect back on those days of their many wooden boats begging for repair, the distinctive smells of their salt water soaked wood and my imaginary tales they secretly withheld, and not to mention the few incredible individuals I got to meet and interact with as true pieces of the Miami River boating community and history!



Raising my “Pot Line” certainly resolved my dirty waterline issues over these many years, but said memories are much more enduring than my clean white stripe!

Fair Winds and hopefully EQUALLY GREAT MEMORIES to all!!!! ...ARGHHH!!!
Pot is legal in Vermont but not on the lake. Guess it’s time to raise the line.
 

tenders

Innocent Bystander
I attended college on a Navy ROTC scholarship, and my university's Navy unit had a pretty spectacular 51' Morgan Out Islander which cruised, over the years, from Lake Michigan to Bermuda. While the Naval Academy has its own fleet of sailboats, at the time, ROTC programs around the country had sailboats that had been seized from drug trafficking. The costs of refurbishing and maintaining those boats was met by the sale of seized powerboats. As the story went, the Morgan had been confiscated filled to the brim with bags of pot, with just enough room down below for two crew members to sleep and eat, and with the waterline raised more than a foot, so she looked like she was sailing more on her lines.

I can confirm that the waterline had been changed - the residue was evident when she was hauled out of the water and you could sight down the length of the boat from the bow or the stern.

(Unfortunately that program got phased out so now the Navy ROTC midshipmen only sail small boats.)
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
I attended college on a Navy ROTC scholarship, and my university's Navy unit had a pretty spectacular 51' Morgan Out Islander which cruised, over the years, from Lake Michigan to Bermuda. While the Naval Academy has its own fleet of sailboats, at the time, ROTC programs around the country had sailboats that had been seized from drug trafficking. The costs of refurbishing and maintaining those boats was met by the sale of seized powerboats. As the story went, the Morgan had been confiscated filled to the brim with bags of pot, with just enough room down below for two crew members to sleep and eat, and with the waterline raised more than a foot, so she looked like she was sailing more on her lines.

I can confirm that the waterline had been changed - the residue was evident when she was hauled out of the water and you could sight down the length of the boat from the bow or the stern.

(Unfortunately that program got phased out so now the Navy ROTC midshipmen only sail small boats.)

When motoring up the Miami River I noticed another thing. ...Besides the raised waterlines, MANY commercial fishing boats had little fishing equipment anymore BUT LOTS OF FANCY ELECTRONICS, RADIO ANTENNAS AND RADAR EQUIPMENT!!

(OBVIOUSLY their intended fishing was for “Square Grouper” as it was referred to back in the 70’s!)
 
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