New stanchion platform

JPS27

Member III
Just thought I'd share what is a big accomplishment for me. Andy at Boatworks Today walked me through it. As I always say, I"m not that handy but I can watch youtubes and follow expert advice. The before pic shows the original fix. Apparently someone smacked something and damaged the stanchion platform and toerail. All I know is that I was tired of looking at it and without much else to do given quarantine I decided to take it on. It's mostly an aesthetic improvement, but I do think my fix is more solid. I'll spare you all the pics taken at every step of the way. It involved grinding, lots of sanding, epoxy, fairing, material, more sanding, new nonskid paint, regular paint. I would send pics at each step to Andy and we would discuss... I only wish I had matched the paint better, but Andy's comment, was "that's the nature of the beast and it will dull somewhat. "
IMG_2699.jpgIMG_3019.jpgIMG_3022.jpg
 

toddster

Curator of Broken Parts
Blogs Author
Please do post some intermediate steps! I’ve been planning to add a couple of stanchions (I.e. a real midship gate) and haven’t quite worked out the details yet.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Nice work.

Hey, now that you have the gel coat and the tint and are what qualifies here as an expert, when the moment is right you can just give the color match another try. The secret of DIY is doing stuff right the second time--and of course never admitting that to anybody.
 

Tin Kicker

Member III
On AnnaDor the plywood that the stanchion base was fastened to was rotted and delaminated. We used 1/2" pvc and 5200 caulk to make a new piece.
As a heads up, there are two kinds of PVC and the expanded cell ought to be avoided. That is the one sold as house trim by the trade names Azek at Lowes and Elena Millwork at Home Depot. It's great for light uses seeing no load like building box housings and covers. But over time fasteners can crush their way into it so I'd not use it for stanchion supports and such.
 

Tin Kicker

Member III
fwiw, I'm just about done putting a new keel on a beat 1980 'glass kayak I'm rebuilding for Karen and the process is a bit more involved because of the edges but very similar in process. fwiw - She always wanted a faster nicer boat than the inexpensive plastic one she's paddled for years. She is small and doesn't have a deep stroke so this will help with directional control and more of her muscle power will propel the boat forward.

Sanded the surface (clean white area) then started by cutting marine grade okoume plywood to shape and used a 2 part epoxy to put it in place. The angle aluminum and paper clips were to keep it standing while the epoxy set.


Gooped up the fillets with Totalboat 2 part filler and used popsicle stick stirrers (Lowes paint department) to get the shape.


Shaped that with a Harbor Freight sander: https://www.harborfreight.com/power-tools/grinders-sanders/portable-belt-sanders/53-amp-12-in-heavy-duty-bandfile-belt-sander-62863.html

Started with a layer of matt along each side of the base then a BID over the top, then BID on each side of the base, and repeated till I had several layers. Below is probably layer #2 for the bases and the ragged edges get sanded off before the next layer over the top. I pinch the glass where it wants to have a void between it and the end of the plywood and you can see the result two photos down.



Here's a trick I use for stuff like this and stanchion bases. Put down your wet glass, cover it with black trash bag, then lay a heavy soaked wet towel over and the towel will make everything smooth and conform to the curves nicely.

Wow - Just remembered in the above photo how rough the surface of the glass was after 40 years of rocks and sand on the Potomac. It's a 13 foot Phoenix that the previous owner wanted $100 for because it had 3 badly repaired holes in the bottom and he figured it was on its' last use. LOL

Pull the towel and plastic off a few hours later and it looks like this:

MUCH less extra resin and much less sanding this way. Those loose fibers in the middle are just the edge of a fabric layer going over the top and sand right off.

Sand it out, fill the rough spots and prime again, fill the pin holes, prime, and sand again, then gloss white withTotalBoat Wet Edge so it now looks like this:
 
Last edited:
Top