Olson 34 Upper Shroud Rigging Question

racushman

Member I
I'm in the process of replacing the standing rigging on my O34 and have a question for this group.

[As background when I bought the boat I had it trucked to me. I wasn't at the yard when the boat was hauled and the mast was unstepped, and the rigging stripped.]

Question relates to the upper shroud attachment at the mast. In the first picture there is a terminal fitting. The second is the hole in the mast that I assume this terminal slips inside. My question is that there is a hole in the mast where it would seem some kind of fastener would got (where my finger points). And a spot on the terminal where a fastener might go. But i have no fastener in what came with the boat. Anyone know how this is supposed to work. I can't quite get my head around what it should be.

Thanks guys.

RobUpperShroadAtMast.jpgUpperShroudTerminal.jpg
 

67rway

Member II
Hello Rob,

Mine has no mast hole nor fastener above the upper spreader opening, though I do have the same rectangularish holes in the internal shroud plates.

It looks as though someone must have installed a bolt thru the mast and upper shroud plates in yours, for some reason. I could see some utility in sharing the load upward above the upper shroud mast opening, and have considered doing the same on mine.

Out of curiosity, why are you replacing the standing?

Bruce
Olson 34
 

racushman

Member I
Keith - good point, maybe it was a rivet that used to be there not a screw like i was thinking.

Bruce - so assume your terminals just rest in the hole with no physical fastener? This looks like it would work, but don't want to assume anything given the "stakes".

I'm replacing all the standing rigging because I wasn't able to determine from prior owners if it had ever been replaced... so had to assume it was 30+ years old and past its service life (though it was all in good shape). I used the Defender rigging service. All new wire, terminals and turnbuckles for about $2000 in case anyone is considering it. Also, Defender uses the new KOS wire that is supposed to be particularly good.
 

racushman

Member I
Hole does not appear to be threaded.

My first idea to solve this was maybe a stainless sheetmetal screw, but that wouldn't thread up to with the square-ish hole in the cup.

Can't imagine any way to use a nut on each side because I wouldn't be able to get any wrench on the nut inside the mast (well actually i could do one, but not the second)

Only other thing i could come up with that would be a bolt it one long enough to go all the way thru the mast side-to-side with two locking nuts and washers inside the mast to avert any compression. This I think is possible, but then i wonder about internal halyards chafing on it over time.

So all that leaves me thinking it must be a rivet that is the solution. Or maybe nothing at all as Bruce seems to have.
 

Slick470

Member III
We have a very similar setup on our Olson 911 and ours has no fasteners. If you put anything back in there, a rivet seems like the best solution to minimize chafe.
 

CTOlsen

Member III
Pix to come

My boat is hauled and mast lowered. I'll take pix and post over the Thanksgiving holiday.
CTO
 

CTOlsen

Member III
No connector/screw/rivet

Nothing used to keep this plate in place. Likely a tool at the factory was used with the mast head sheave box removed.These pix were taken with the mast down, in a horizontal storage rack, showing both sides of the mast. Lookeee Here....
Cap mast conn1.jpgCap mast conn2.jpg
 

racushman

Member I
Thanks everybody for the help and pictures on this question. I'm going to have the yard put a rivet in it since I've got the hole anyway.

Last question on this thread... as I look at this setup which basically just depends on the structural integrity of the mast wall for all of the upper shroud load, it makes me wonder about the implications of 30+ years of stainless resting on aluminum. Has anyone come up with something to electronically isolate the mast and the cup, maybe tape? Marelube? Just wondering.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Staff member
Senior Moderator
That's a busy area

I would guess that you would pull the shortest rivet that will hold. Four lines (main, jib, two wing halyards) going by/near there, and the less places for chafe the better. Plus the wiring to the anchor light and also the cable to the wind transducer.
 

Slick470

Member III
Thanks everybody for the help and pictures on this question. I'm going to have the yard put a rivet in it since I've got the hole anyway.

Last question on this thread... as I look at this setup which basically just depends on the structural integrity of the mast wall for all of the upper shroud load, it makes me wonder about the implications of 30+ years of stainless resting on aluminum. Has anyone come up with something to electronically isolate the mast and the cup, maybe tape? Marelube? Just wondering.
We had our mast down this past summer for new standing rigging. I didn't notice any corrosion between the stainless and the aluminum around these parts. I did give everything a liberal coating of tef-gel before reinstalling though. Can't hurt right?
 

Keith Parcells

Sustaining Member
Thanks everybody for the help and pictures on this question. I'm going to have the yard put a rivet in it since I've got the hole anyway.

Last question on this thread... as I look at this setup which basically just depends on the structural integrity of the mast wall for all of the upper shroud load, it makes me wonder about the implications of 30+ years of stainless resting on aluminum. Has anyone come up with something to electronically isolate the mast and the cup, maybe tape? Marelube? Just wondering.
Pipe wrap (insulation tape) works well for isolating dis-similar parts.stuff like this:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Advanced-Drainage-Systems-2-in-PVC-Black-Tile-Tape-1137KA/205155061?MERCH=REC-_-pipsem-_-100153842-_-205155061-_-N
 

bgary

Advanced Beginner
Pipe wrap (insulation tape) works well for isolating dis-similar parts...
+1 for pipe-wrap tape.

I use it when (re)mounting anything that has flat-surfaces of dissimilar metals in contact (for example, underneath the antenna mount and masthead-light base at the top of the mast, under the flat-parts of the gooseneck and vang fittings at the bottom, etc).
 

Tom Metzger

Sustaining Partner
+1 for pipe-wrap tape.
Why not use common vinyl electric tape?

It's cheap, already on board, large temperature range, and has more than adequate dielectric strength (1000V/mil*).

* Knowledge from my days chasing "vacuum leaks". :nerd:
 
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