Origo 3000 stove top

mordust

Member II
Last year we found a brand new Origo 3000 stove top, and have just installed it in the galley. I have read some of the threads here about refilling the canisters. And I have read here and in the manual concerning how much fuel the canisters hold. But I am not clear on whether this is the amount the canister will actually hold, or the amount it should hold when correctly filled to the recommended amount. I am thinking that I would buy a couple of those camping type fuel bottles in a size that would be close to that recommended amount. That way, when the canister runs out, I would have the right amount at hand, in the bottle, ready to refill.

Also, I think these canisters look pretty much bullet proof, and guess they will last forever. Is this true? Or would it be a good idea to buy a spare before they become totally unavailable.

Thanks
Bob G
 

jtsai

Junior Member
I had an Origo 3000 and recall the instruction says to tilt the canister on its side and fill it until liquid overflows from the center opening. I made big mess every time doing that way so just poured into the canister while in stove. Since the alcohol evaporates even with the seal, put just enough for cooking and be prepared to refill often. Hardware store denatured alcohol works great, camping fuel bottle is a good idea to control pour volume.

Cannot imaging what can break that require spare, there is no moving parts.

Jeff T.
1990 Ericson 32-3, Ardea
New Bern, NC
 

paul culver

Member III
The method posted here of pouring into a large tin can with a puncture in the bottom placed over the origo canister is probably the best of all. Decrease your pour volumes as you go along. When the canister starts overflowing you're done. Turn the canister upside down to empty the overfill and wipe dry. I do this operation on the cockpit sole. I tried using a jiggle siphon but I think the alcohol is too low of a viscosity for it to work.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
The comment about checking the "fullness" by tilting it 90 degrees is true. Gotta say, other than curiosity, we seldom ever need to do that. In real life, one standard Campbell soup can, with a 1/4 inch hold in the center of the bottom, gives us enough burner time for several days. The burner pot would safely hold more, but refueling is easy and we worry about it when it's empty.... after all when one burner is empty, we just move the pan to the other one and keep on cooking.
Later, when the stove is cold we refuel both of them.
 

wynkoop

Member III
I have had one since 1985 and I just keep my fuel in the tin it comes in from Home Depot and pour in a little when I need to cook. As others have said if you fill it and do not use it soon it will vanish into the ether.
 

Tin Kicker

Member III
Not if you cover the canisters with neoprene gaskets.
Agreed. And while you can buy the custom ones from Dometic for $23.66 as part number 3880036-00, you can make a pair for less than $5 from Home Depot or Lowes heat resistant rubber sheet in the plumbing department:
 

Alan Gomes

Sustaining Member
Agreed. And while you can buy the custom ones from Dometic for $23.66 as part number 3880036-00, you can make a pair for less than $5 from Home Depot or Lowes heat resistant rubber sheet in the plumbing department:
That looks like a really good option.

I bought this material from McMaster-Carr and cut two large circles out of it for my canisters:

1595178682443.png
 

Cbuydos

Junior Member
The neoprene gasket idea works great. Used an old wetsuit. When you take them off you can see the condensation. Any tip on what to use for the oven. Not enough clearance for neoprene as you have to slide the canister in and it tends to bunch up you lose the seal.
 

Tin Kicker

Member III
Rubber band over any old baggy or piece of plastic. Saran/Cling wrap would work but is a pain because of how it sticks to itself.
 
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