Sailing Anarchy vid review of the 35-2

Geoff W.

Makes Up For It With Enthusiasm
Blogs Author
Sailing Anarchy has started a YouTube video series where they go through and take another look at classic boats of a more recent history, and they did a 70’s Ericson 35-2 walkthrough fairly recently.


Nothing new to many of us but it’s a nice sense of pride to see your chosen boat maker praised in 2020, especially when compared favorably to a newer Beneteau in the slip next door.
 
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1911tex

Sustaining Member
Ours is an '85 35-3. Noted lots of similarity; however there are a few differences, especially interior setup.
 

1911tex

Sustaining Member
The bright, modern-seeming white interior of the subject boat makes losing the vinyl headliner and teak cabin walls seem like a good idea.
Your supposition gives me some great possibilities........the more open effect of more white in the interior....very good!
 

Kenneth K

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
A new Hanse 418 marketing photo. The profile view looks like a floating shoebox. With shoebox-like portlights to match...

Screenshot_20201023-230832~2.png
The in-hull portlights appear to be different sizes and at different elevations, but I think it's all a trick of the eye, perhaps a result of not being able to tell whether the hull itself is rectangular or curved. Very displeasing to the eye in my opinion.
 
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1911tex

Sustaining Member
That Hanse has lost all its flavor (class) as far as a traditional sailboat to me.....but to put it into perspective with all the currently manufactured sailboat offerings....they all have that "box car" shape. That bow angle reminds me of early 1900's military steam ships. For what they cost nowadays, even with all the current promotional discounts....I love my Ericson more every day!
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
That Hanse has lost all its flavor (class) as far as a traditional sailboat to me.....but to put it into perspective with all the currently manufactured sailboat offerings....they all have that "box car" shape. That bow angle reminds me of early 1900's military steam ships. For what they cost nowadays, even with all the current promotional discounts....I love my Ericson more every day!
In a (thin) defense, those boats are not being designed and bought for use by sailors so much as purchased by folks who want to be viewed - in their own non sailing peer group - as "sailors".
:rolleyes:
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
These guys are still making them to look like they did, at least for now: https://www.siyachts.com/used-yachts-for-sale/2021-tartan-4300_2762530

Then again, for 550k, you could get a 70s/80s Tartan (or better), do a complete refit, and then have the money left to go cruising for a long, long time.
Seems like a lot of money, but then it's a high quality large and complex vessel.
That said, if wanting a boat of that general size, I could probably spend a bit less and perhaps talk Guy and Melissa out of their restored E-46. :)

Speaking of "value", you're getting close to the reason we are using this 'pandemic year' to do a full refit. I will have about 60K additional $ into our boat, proving that I am definitely not in this sport to make money. OTOH the plan is to have a like-new boat equivalent to about a 300K new performance cruiser. Some of this expenditure is going into big cruising upgrades like the new furnace and a full rewire of the spar, I should point out.

I would not mind an "equivalent" Tartan if I could afford a newer one, but they have never really built a direct competitor to either the Olson 34 or the Ericson 34-2. Our boat or the Ericson's really do have an very unusual combination of comfort and sailing ease. And -- Speed.
:egrin:
 
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Geoff W.

Makes Up For It With Enthusiasm
Blogs Author
Seems like a lot of money, but then it's a high quality large and complex vessel.
That said, if wanting a boat of that general size, I could probably spend a bit less and perhaps talk Guy and Melissa out of their restored E-46. :)

Speaking of "value", you're getting close to the reason we are using this 'pandemic year' to do a full refit. I will have about 60K additional $ into our boat, proving that I am definitely not in this sport to make money. OTOH the plan is to have a like-new boat equivalent to about a 300K new performance cruiser. Some of this expenditure is going into big cruising upgrades like the new furnace, I should point out.

I would not mind an "equivalent" Tartan if I could afford a newer one, but they have never really built a direct competitor to either the Olson 34 or the Ericson 34-2. Our boat or the Ericson's really do have an very unusual combination of comfort and sailing ease. And -- Speed.
:egrin:
An Olson 30 got line honors at a recent race here this weekend - coming out ahead of Farr 39s, Aerodynes, J111s... speaks for itself :)
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
A dockmate sold his 1993 Tartan 38 last year for $120K. He was surprised (and pleased).

He had high maintenance standards and the boat was typical Tartan quality. But belowdecks, for all that, it was not roomy. About equivalent of the E381.

A broker told me that some '90s boats can still be financed, whereas our era is usually too old to qualify and actually requires cash (or a credit union or home equity loan). That depresses price, but not value.
 
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