Securing the anchor

Canopus

Member I
We anchored our 35-3 for the first time the other day and it went well. However, I'm not sure the best way to cleat off the anchor rode on this boat. I put it on one of the bow cleats with the line going through the bow roller but it seems that this puts pressure on the bow pulpit and creates a chafe point
IMG_20200414_155458030_HDR-01.jpeg
Is this ok or is there a better way?
 

Alan Gomes

Sustaining Member
We anchored our 35-3 for the first time the other day and it went well. However, I'm not sure the best way to cleat off the anchor rode on this boat. I put it on one of the bow cleats with the line going through the bow roller but it seems that this puts pressure on the bow pulpit and creates a chafe point
View attachment 33307
Is this ok or is there a better way?
I have the identical issue on my E26-2. What I do is use a bridle, which I attach to the rode with a Prussik hitch.

Photo Apr 18, 2 28 11 PM.jpg

Photo Apr 18, 12 54 30 PM.jpg
 

garryh

Member III
I do not think it is wise to have the rode played out and left on the roller in any but the most benign conditions, it is not meant for these forces.
The 35-2 does not have an anchor locker like the 35-3 so has cleats more central and fairleads where your cleats are.
With your configuration, I would use some slack to create a loop and take the rode off the roller and outside the pulpit leg directly to the cleat. The fact that it is slightly off centre would not be an issue.
 

Canopus

Member I
Thanks for the replies! I think I'll probably go with the garryh suggestion of just moving the line outboard and cleating it off. Though a bridle would similarly eliminate the pressure on the bow roller and seems like it would have the added benefit of splitting the load between the two cleats so I kind of like that solution also.
 

garryh

Member III
I was also going to suggest maybe mounting an open top fairlead maybe 16" or so ahead of the cleat, but getting at the underside to mount and support it might be very difficult (unless you can access from the anchor locker?)
 

footrope

Contributing Partner
Blogs Author
It's good to hear you had a good first experience anchoring. We really love anchoring as it allows us to get away from crowded guest docks and relax with more privacy.

Many of us, including me, have asked that same question. In typical cruising weather and wave conditions I think cleating a nylon anchor line (not chain) on the right hand bow cleat is perfectly acceptable and that is the way I do it. There is nothing wrong with the other suggestions, including adding a cleat or guide/fairlead to keep the rode off the pulpit leg. But, for the typical anchoring conditions and length of stay, that cleating technique is not going to cause any problems for you.

The rode rides above the sharp edge of the pulpit base. As long as your pulpit is secure in the base you won't bend it or hurt the rode. You might check for gouges or a burr on the leg of the pulpit where the line rides and file/sand it smooth if necessary.

The anchor roller on your 35-3 bow is probably 3/16 or 1/4 inch thick, made of stainless steel. It is probably welded to the forestay chainplate on your vintage 35-3. It is installed with plenty of heavy fasteners in a heavily reinforced bow. It is not going to bend under almost any condition you can get while anchored. There should be a pair of holes at the forward top end of the roller frame. Putting the proper diameter pin through there after setting the anchor will prevent the rode from jumping out of the roller if it does get choppy. See the attached picture, which is from a friend's 1985 E38. I made a short lanyard for the pin I use and it hangs off the right side of the pulpit where I can always reach it while tidying up after setting anchor.

Cheers!
 

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1911tex

Member III
We anchored our 35-3 for the first time the other day and it went well. However, I'm not sure the best way to cleat off the anchor rode on this boat. I put it on one of the bow cleats with the line going through the bow roller but it seems that this puts pressure on the bow pulpit and creates a chafe point
View attachment 33307
Is this ok or is there a better way?
Canopus: What is that line in the center of your anchor locker...my 35-3 does not have it?
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Yes. And if anchored in waves, probably not by choice, the popping off [that Craig mentioned above] is very likely. The pin can be reinforced with line wraps. Under worrisome conditions, the rode should be led back to the mast base and secured there, in case the cleat or cleats give way.

I rode out an 18-hour 40-knot gale with 20-foot seas on a 38' Newick trimaran far offshore. We lay to a sea anchor after not being able to reduce bare-poles running speed below 12 knots (!), even dragging lines, anchors and the companionway ladder. The 300+ feet of Nylon rode put the parachute two crests to windward, which was the recommended distance, so it would not be yanked into thin air between waves. Trimarans, light and without a fixed keel, respond very well to sea anchors (not so sure about our fin-keel boats). The effect belowdecks was likr being on the end of a rubber band--the rode would stretch, stretch, stretch, then yank! Hard to sleep, but breaking seas swept harmless under the bow.

With the rode secured to the mast, the chief issue was the rising of the rode off the bow in troughs, and the threat of chafe. I wrapped the chafe area with towels and duct tape. I rigged heavy guide lines from either side to keep the rode at least centered under the pulpit. There was no way to secure it, and any anchor chock pin would have failed given the radical change in angles.

In extreme anchoring conditions, a pitching bow probably defeats any standard setup and will require attention.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Speaking of having that roller fastened down securely, here is a link to a picture of the underside of our bow showing G10 plate and quite a layer of thickened epoxy and another G10 plate. This spreads the load for the SS anchor roller on top.
 

1911tex

Member III
Yes. And if anchored in waves, probably not by choice, the popping off [that Craig mentioned above] is very likely. The pin can be reinforced with line wraps. Under worrisome conditions, the rode should be led back to the mast base and secured there, in case the cleat or cleats give way.

I rode out an 18-hour 40-knot gale with 20-foot seas on a 38' Newick trimaran far offshore. We lay to a sea anchor after not being able to reduce bare-poles running speed below 12 knots (!), even dragging lines, anchors and the companionway ladder. The 300+ feet of Nylon rode put the parachute two crests to windward, which was the recommended distance, so it would not be yanked into thin air between waves. Trimarans, light and without a fixed keel, respond very well to sea anchors (not so sure about our fin-keel boats). The effect belowdecks was likr being on the end of a rubber band--the rode would stretch, stretch, stretch, then yank! Hard to sleep, but breaking seas swept harmless under the bow.

With the rode secured to the mast, the chief issue was the rising of the rode off the bow in troughs, and the threat of chafe. I wrapped the chafe area with towels and duct tape. I rigged heavy guide lines from either side to keep the rode at least centered under the pulpit. There was no way to secure it, and any anchor chock pin would have failed given the radical change in angles.

In extreme anchoring conditions, a pitching bow probably defeats any standard setup and will require attention.
Reading this was like riding a saddle cinched to the tail of a tornado! I don't think Lake Travis gets that rough....
 

Canopus

Member I
Canopus: What is that line in the center of your anchor locker...my 35-3 does not have it?
There is an eye in the deck (aft of the anchor locker) for a spinnaker downhaul. in the picture I have a spare halyard attached to it for hanging a hammock that my daughter is swinging in just out of frame :cool:

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supersailor

Contributing Partner
A dock cleat does not provide a secure anchor point for the anchor and rode. The shock loads during a blow from both the wind load and pitching can rip one right out of the deck. If that's what you use, I would be very nervous in a windy anchorage. Ericson did not provide well for anchoring with the shallow anchor rode pan and no anchor post. Maybe we were supposed to stick with round the buoys racing. The smaller boats don't need a windlass but an anchor bit is mandatory. In my 26 I just ran the rode back to a primary if I needed a little oomph. The 34 is a whole different story. Hauling the big bruce along with 50' of 5/16" chain in 30 knots with about 14,500lbs of Ericson and gear were a bit much.

There are several good threads here on adding windlasses and anchoring here. If you anchor a lot, add at least an anchor bit. The weather man is wrong too many times.
 

garryh

Member III
a substantial and well backed cleat can handle most of what any weather can throw at it. A rode hanging off a bow roller is something else entirely. It is a 'your boat your choice' thing, but in my view it is serious damage waiting to happen.
 

garryh

Member III
some pics from a link to a link to a link that Loren posted originally... bow rollers are not structurally sound for transverse loads. Heavy lateral loading can tear them right off. Best to get the rode onto a strong cleat asap. But yes... a bitt would be best if you have the room.
 

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Gaviate

Member I
Painfully entertaining but oh so valuable to me a newbie...Last spring, upon purchase of my E27 I found that the foredeck was toast. I rebuilt it and at the same time, built up the foremost triangle with the intention of installing an anchor roller, and installed a large cleat dedicated for the anchor rode, and as garryh and Loren suggest, this cleat is backed by oversized metal plate. The roller that came with the boat is what I considered to be light duty (I mean just looking at the thing) and so thought it would be useful for stowing the anchor when not in use, and for controlled deployment and retrieval of the line (alas no windlass), but at no time have I considered that I would ever use that roller whilst at anchor...thanks all for reinforcing my paranoia:oops:
 
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footrope

Contributing Partner
Blogs Author
some pics from a link to a link to a link that Loren posted originally... bow rollers are not structurally sound for transverse loads. Heavy lateral loading can tear them right off. Best to get the rode onto a strong cleat asap. But yes... a bitt would be best if you have the room.
I'd be interested in the story of both incidents pictured in your post. Scary looking. The bent roller in the third picture isn't from the installation pictured in the first two, that show the bow of a boat and the fractured wooden platform. I'm pretty sure that the roller in picture number one tore out long before it bent significantly. It doesn't appear to be a professionally engineered roller platform either. It looks pretty, but I don't see any support from below or how it could have been tied directly into any of the actual bow structure.

The roller installation isn't anything like the stock installations on the Ericsons we are discussing here. Excessive side loads will certainly bend a bow roller, even a well-designed one. Other than storms or hurricanes, I think wind generated loads, swimming back and forth and hobby horsing, etc. are unlikely to tear one out or even bend a stock Ericson roller very much.

Note that the roller in my first picture (1985 E38) is welded to the forestay chainplate. Earlier bronze rollers like the one from my 1980 E38 (picture 2) are even less likely to be broken off in anchoring situations because they are less extended out in front of the bow. The second picture shows my original bronze roller and the Rocna 15kg anchor profile while I was designing my new roller. The bronze roller was independent of the steel forestay chainplate.
 

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p.gazibara

Member III
Very interesting thread! We have lived on anchor for a few years now, in all sorts of conditions, though thankfully nothing like the experience described on that Newick Tri!

To clarify your question, are you asking about how to lash the anchor when underway? We have found it best to remove the anchor if we are going to windward in any sea. We lost an anchor off the bow when pounding into 2-3m steep seas off the coast of Nicaragua during those pesky papagayos. It was lashed on with two lashings, but they must have chafed through when our mantis plunged into the sea. It was amazing how the anchor acted like a brake when the bow would hit a wave. The whole boat would slow. When the anchor was lost, the ride was much better. Go figure. On shorter passages we leave the anchor up there and lash it to the pulpit, but only if we leave the chain attached.

If you are asking about when anchoring, we tie a snubber on. The snubber goes through one of the chocks and to the cleat.

Maybe consider running the anchor rode through one of the chocks and using your cleat instead of going over the bow roller. The boat will dance a bit more, but it’s not very bothersome.

If you don’t trust the cleat, I would remedy that first. An emergency line to the mast also works.
 

p.gazibara

Member III
So I reread the post and looked at the photo...

I would consider making a bridle that you could run from both cleats to your anchor rode. A rolling hitch could easily connect the bridle to the rode.
 
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