Solving a mystery [Ericson Factory Construction Photos]

Dimonkarz95

New Member
Hi I recently purchased a 1981 Ericson 38. I found a old photo album when digging underneath the navigation station which seems to be from the factory. It reads "much special work was done to make her a very strong boat. She is much more than a stock boat". Any information on what exactly they're referring too would be appreciated. I can submit additional pictures/info on request.
 

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Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Be fun to see those photos.

Likely the first owner taking pictures of her being built, right? Boat name--Zabia, or Zabis ?

book0200311_110132.jpg
 

Dimonkarz95

New Member
Be fun to see those photos.

Likely the first owner taking pictures of her being built, right? Boat name--Zabia, or Zabis ?

View attachment 32813
Being that I've only owned her since Saturday I am just starting to dig into the history of the boat. It has unfortunately undergone some name changes throughout its almost 40 years. I believe the original name was Zafir. I posted the few pics that I have taken. Will post more tomorrow when I see her!
 

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Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Wow! What a trove. Actual factory pix.

Please consider uploading them all into an album when you get time, they're good history and may help us understand construction sequences among other things.

I think the path is Media/Albums and the "child category" is Ericson 38.
 

Bolo

Member III
Your photos are amazing! Please do share the rest. I can't imagine being present when your own boat is being built. I imagine that the images we taken in Irvine, CA? I think that's were the Ericson plant was located if memory serves me. I suggest that if you know anyone with a flat bed scanner you should use that to create high resolution digital files. (If possible)
 

wynkoop

Member II
Perhaps you could scan the photos. If you do not have a scanner there is a wonderful android program called camscanner that will do the trick. If you place the photos flat on a table and hold your phone camera parallel to the table top the program will correct for any minor parallax.

This is a treasure of history.
 

Gaviate

Junior Member
What a spectacular find! Some treasures are better than gold:)
Thanks for sharing, as alluded to above, much can be learned of how things are put together...may save me from taking something apart (a.k.a. learning the hard way).
 

Dimonkarz95

New Member
Good morning to everyone from another beautiful day on the bay (raining). I posted the rest of the pictures I had during the construction of my Ericson 38. Maybe some of you will recognize your own in the background :) any information on what makes her "much more than a stock boat" would be appreciated. Hope to put together an album when I find more time. Thank you for the awesome welcome to the community!
 

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toddster

Curator of Broken Parts
Blogs Author
That cradle photo may answer a nagging question I’ve had. I found out the hard way that the hull of my boat is flexible enough that it has a slightly different shape in the cradle than it does in the water. Any work - like installing furniture or new bulkheads - doesn’t quite fit so well, when the boat is floated. So now we know how they did it at the factory!
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Back in the day, I watched hulls being molded out and finished out at Cascade Yachts in PDX and at Ranger Boats in Kent, WA.
I believe that everyone either had a custom mold to lower a fresh hull into for the interior fit-out, or as these small builders did, leave the hull in the mold until the interior bulkheads were all in place.
 

trickdhat

Member III
Blogs Author
This is such a cool find. After digging around in bilges formulating ideas on how our boats were constructed, it's really interesting seeing how they were actually built. I love seeing pictures of the bare hull before and after the grid is fit.
 
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