suddenly e 41 hull id #2

suddenlye41

New Member
I purchased suddenly 1 year ago she need some paint etc I am trying to find her her origanal and if she did transpac in 69 or 71 ?? she also has a stearman engine with a new new gearbox which is misaligned the boat lived inhawaii for 25 years spent 15 in the chesepeake bfore return g san diego I purchased it from jack p who owned it for this time ... I tried looking in the coast guard record but cannot find her original name thanks ned knight
 

bgary

Advanced Beginner
Blogs Author
Following up:

In the 1969 Transpac, there were two Ericson 41s listed among the entries:

-- Pericus (sail number 7925, Huntington Harbor YC, owner William Wright)
-- Valerie (sail number 7853, Hawaii Yacht Club, owner Robert Oldham)

In the 1971 Transpac, there were three Ericson 41s listed:

-- Bevika (sail number 8554, Metropolitan YC, owner Dick Bockius)
-- Flying Cloud (sail number 19124, Portland YC, owner Edwin de Koning)
-- Valerie (same data as above... with the note that she was dismasted in the 1969 Transpac)

-- there was also an Ericson-39, Blue Orpheus (sail number 27734, Long Beach YC, owner Richard Johnson)

In the 1973 Transpac, Bevika (Ericson 41) is the only Ericson listed

In the 1975 Transpac, the entry list included

-- Blue Star (Ericson 39, sail number 37599, owner Brian Carter)
-- Conception (Ericson 37, sail number 7378, owner Larry Bradley)
-- Vind Fempe-Del (Ericson 39, sail number 1500, from Nagoya, Japan)



That's all I've found, so far....
 
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Greenie

5 O'clock Somewhere
Hi,
Im really curious about any improvements you’ve done on “Suddenly” - I had actually put a deposit down on her about 2 years ago, but decided to back out with so many looming issues ... I drove down from LA thinking this was it I was going to purchase a ‘69 Ericson only to find out the engine wouldn’t start amongst other thing. i hope you got a good deal and are fixing her up ... she has such potential and beauty... I just didn’t have the $$ or skills to do it right.

would love to see what you’ve done along the way.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Alas, that was Suddenly's first and last message on the forum.

Apparently the issues that loomed for you loomed even bigger for the purchaser.
 

Kidmag

New Member
Suddenly was for sale for a long time siting in the Chula Vista Marina. Listing dropped off about 6-8 months ago. I had intended to go look at it her, but the broker scared me. Said she's been siting for a long long time, had lots of water damage from leaks. He made it clear it was a project boat - which is not what I was looking for.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
I thought about that model at one time. I concluded I didn't want a late-60s project boat, no matter how pretty. The design is too far from current expectations, the cost of bringing her back stupendous and the resale fairly impossible.
 

Kidmag

New Member
are you sure...... https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1968/ericson-41-sloop-3253580/ :)

Actually I'm enamored with the 41, victimized by those beautiful lines... But I haven't had the chance to sail on one, and all the reviews are from the same guy - an editor from Practical Sailor. If she sails well in our Southern California light air and can point (cause lets face it, from San Diego you are pointing somewhere always), then I'm in real trouble and may make a financially disastrous life choice - but I'll be smiling in the beginning!
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Lots of boats sail well. It's a business decision. If I wanted a 41 I'd look for one that had had 50K spent on it recently and with an asking price of 50K, which would be an optimistic seller..

It's a big boat. You can't paint the spars or hull yourself, too massive. It needs a new engine. It needs new tanks. It needs a bottom job. it needs new seacocks and hoses, winches, rigging and lines, electronics and then there's the cosmetics of upholstery and varnish and so on.

Is that just defeatism? Well, the issue is that everything's 50 years old. Everything is beyond its design life. It is impractical to make such a boat seaworthy for the purposes it was intended--family cruising, maybe even the South Seas. So it becomes a permanent project incapable of fulfilling its design intention.

Such a boat can indeed be a trophy, a restoration that draws admiration far and wide, a tribute, a legacy created independent of standard tastes and needs. Actually, you could put 100K into an E41 and have a very cool boat.

But for $100K you can also have a used Hanse 40. Time marches on and leaves beauty behind.
 
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toddster

Curator of Broken Parts
Blogs Author
Yeah, I looked hard at that ad a while back. (And kicked the tires on a few other boats in that size/price range.) Yeah, it's possible and almost within budget. But then I think how much more time I could spend cruising on the little 49 y/o boat that I've already (almost) restored, for that amount of money and extra time.
Well... let me sink this one first.
 
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