Transmission--Did I damage it?

Hcard

Member II
Hello everyone, i have an E32 1990. Trying to get into a slip i had to chamge gears really fast from forward/backward. It is working but seems to be noisier than usual, Did i damage the transmission? is it serious? Many thanks for any comments, advice etc.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Not as many of our group will have your Kanzaki (sp) transmission, but someone should have suggestions.
Basics: Have you been changing out the trans. oil per the recommendation in the manual, or at least once a year? Presently, is the oil level up to where it should be on the stick?
FWIW, my former Universal engine with a Hurth transmission had a note about reversing at rpm's above the recommended idle, and I recall that it said to avoid it, but you could do it in an emergency. Evidently there was a risk to the friction material on the disks inside. No mechanic am I, so that little bit is all that I know.
 

Hcard

Member II
Not as many of our group will have your Kanzaki (sp) transmission, but someone should have suggestions.
Basics: Have you been changing out the trans. oil per the recommendation in the manual, or at least once a year? Presently, is the oil level up to where it should be on the stick?
FWIW, my former Universal engine with a Hurth transmission had a note about reversing at rpm's above the recommended idle, and I recall that it said to avoid it, but you could do it in an emergency. Evidently there was a risk to the friction material on the disks inside. No mechanic am I, so that little bit is all that I know.
Great, thank you. So seems there is room for this kind of rapid gear changes. Thank you for your reply.
 

Bolo

Member III
You should get you transmission looked at by a qualified mechanic if you think there is a problem. Transmission replacement isn't cheap. I had the replace my Hurth on my 32-3 (1987) with a Beta Marine transmission which works great BTW. As for getting your boat into the slip, may I suggest that you back your boat in all the way without changing to forward and reverse so much. I don't know your situation but if your setup like I am here is what I do. My slip is about half way down the fairway on my dock. When I approach the marina I position my boat about 50 to 60 feet away from the entrance to the fairway, with the marina to port, and at a slight angle with the stern pointing towards the opening, a little. At this point the boat has almost stopped it's forward movement. Then I change to reverse and quickly increase engine speed (again, IN REVERSE) for about two to three seconds which "prop walks" the stern to port and towards the opening to the fairway. At this point I am standing not behind the wheel but turned around, 180 degrees, facing the stern (in front of the binnacle) with my hands on the wheel. In other words I'm steering the boat facing backwards. Try it a few times. After you get use to the transmission and engine controls being backwards maneuvering the boat this way is easy, at least for me. I then steer the boat with very little or no throttle (idling) with the transmission in reverse. I'll slip the boat out of reverse if I feel that I'm going too fast or give a bit more throttle depending on how the wind is accreting the boat. By the time I get to turning and backing into my slip I'm out of gear with the engine idling. If my "first mate" is with me she ties off a spring line to the mid cleat . If I'm solo I can easily stop the boat by slipping into forward and giving it a bit of throttle. This give me time to attache the spring line. Then I slip into reverse, at idle, and the boat moves deeper into the slip until the spring goes taut. Then back in neutral and tie off the other dock lines. I never go faster then I would like to hit something. Slow with control is the key and I'm not going into forward and reverse that much. Takes a bit of practice but works without a hitch for me almost every time with the occasional error on my part which is still easy to control.
 

Hcard

Member II
You should get you transmission looked at by a qualified mechanic if you think there is a problem. Transmission replacement isn't cheap. I had the replace my Hurth on my 32-3 (1987) with a Beta Marine transmission which works great BTW. As for getting your boat into the slip, may I suggest that you back your boat in all the way without changing to forward and reverse so much. I don't know your situation but if your setup like I am here is what I do. My slip is about half way down the fairway on my dock. When I approach the marina I position my boat about 50 to 60 feet away from the entrance to the fairway, with the marina to port, and at a slight angle with the stern pointing towards the opening, a little. At this point the boat has almost stopped it's forward movement. Then I change to reverse and quickly increase engine speed (again, IN REVERSE) for about two to three seconds which "prop walks" the stern to port and towards the opening to the fairway. At this point I am standing not behind the wheel but turned around, 180 degrees, facing the stern (in front of the binnacle) with my hands on the wheel. In other words I'm steering the boat facing backwards. Try it a few times. After you get use to the transmission and engine controls being backwards maneuvering the boat this way is easy, at least for me. I then steer the boat with very little or no throttle (idling) with the transmission in reverse. I'll slip the boat out of reverse if I feel that I'm going too fast or give a bit more throttle depending on how the wind is accreting the boat. By the time I get to turning and backing into my slip I'm out of gear with the engine idling. If my "first mate" is with me she ties off a spring line to the mid cleat . If I'm solo I can easily stop the boat by slipping into forward and giving it a bit of throttle. This give me time to attache the spring line. Then I slip into reverse, at idle, and the boat moves deeper into the slip until the spring goes taut. Then back in neutral and tie off the other dock lines. I never go faster then I would like to hit something. Slow with control is the key and I'm not going into forward and reverse that much. Takes a bit of practice but works without a hitch for me almost every time with the occasional error on my part which is still easy to control.
Bolo, thank you very much for your very thorough response. This is a great lesson!! I am having trouble steering not only because I mm kind of newly bu also because I have done it when the tides/current are strong, compounding the difficulty. I will try your suggestion and revert but in the meantime, thank you very much.
 

Bolo

Member III
As far as getting proficient with docking your boat I’m reminded of the old musical joke of a young musician‘s first visit to New York City who stopped someone on the street to ask, “How do I get to Carnegie Hall?” The passerby responded by saying, “Practice, practice, practice!” Wait for a day with no wind and practice going in and out of you slip about a half dozen times. You‘ll learn something with through each cycle and you don’t have to get your docking lines on each time. Just get the boat to a point where you feel confident about its position in the slip.
 

Hcard

Member II
As far as getting proficient with docking your boat I’m reminded of the old musical joke of a young musician‘s first visit to New York City who stopped someone on the street to ask, “How do I get to Carnegie Hall?” The passerby responded by saying, “Practice, practice, practice!” Wait for a day with no wind and practice going in and out of you slip about a half dozen times. You‘ll learn something with through each cycle and you don’t have to get your docking lines on each time. Just get the boat to a point where you feel confident about its position in the slip.
Thank you !!! I guess sailing is an art form that needs to nurtured! Thank you for your comments! Much appreciated!!!
 
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