Which is your favorite way to whip the end of a sheet or other boat lines.....

1911tex

Sustaining Member
Yale Whiplock, Leather Palm and Needle with an initial knot to secure the bitter end or a combination of both?
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
I have used a simple method for several decades. Waxed nylon 'twine' which is really like oversized dental floss.
I found a picture on the WWW that is pretty descriptive.
Admittedly, this is not as secure as some other methods where a needle and palm are used to pull the end thru the line to really secure it. I have done that too, but laziness seems to call me back to the simpler technique. :)
 

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paul culver

Member III
I use Loren's method too without taking a stitch and its never slipped off or come undone.. Its the method I learned in Boy Scouts.
 

1911tex

Sustaining Member
I have used a simple method for several decades. Waxed nylon 'twine' which is really like oversized dental floss.
I found a picture on the WWW that is pretty descriptive.
Admittedly, this is not as secure as some other methods where a needle and palm are used to pull the end thru the line to really secure it. I have done that too, but laziness seems to call me back to the simpler technique. :)
If I am not mistaken (usually am) that is the same tie method as the "Yale Whiplock"...which we tied in the Sea Scouts forever ago and mentioned in the first post above. Please correct if wrong!!
 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
My only addition would be to suggest that if you are working with a synthetic rope, be sure to first bind the line with masking tape or similar, then cut it within the taped portion, then burn the end. Remove the tape, and then you have a compressed mass of synthetic melted together, before your start your whipping.

Tape compression + melted cut + whipping = sturdy compact end for feeding through clutches, etc..
 

Keith Parcells

Sustaining Member
and take the two loose ends and tie them together with a square knot.
Use the first loose end to pull the loop and the second free end completely under the rows of wrap so it becomes “buried,” Then trim the first (and only remaining) loose end.
 

trickdhat

Member III
Blogs Author
I used the method Lauren shared for most of the lines on Luffalee, but I switched to a method Brian Toss discussed with Andy Schell on his 59 Degrees North Podcast:

https://www.59-north.com/onthewindpodcast/2014/8/8/podcast-brion-toss-on-the-art-of-rope-whippings

The Brian Toss method seems more secure, but I've only had one of the other whippings come loose. The failure was because I pulled the knot too close to the end. If I'm in a hurry, I'll use Lauren's method, but if I have the tools and a bit of time, I try to use Brian's method. The podcast also convinced me to stop melting the ends. I was reluctant at first, but it does go through clutches easier and doesn't' hurt when you forget a stopper knot and the end pulls through your hand. 20200913_153020.jpg
 

frick

Member III
I have used both methods, but my waxed nylon line has a large needle in it... so I tend to do the Toss Method more often
 

Keith Parcells

Sustaining Member
Which is first and which is second? Or do I just pick one?
Steve,

By first loose end, I meant it as shown in Lorens diagram, above. It forms a loop that extends up toward the end of the line. After all the rows are wrapped over that loop, the last wrap has another “tail” which then is put through that loop. Then pull on the other loose end to pull he loop and “bury” the tail.

clear as mud, right?
 

Keith Parcells

Sustaining Member
I used the method Lauren shared for most of the lines on Luffalee, but I switched to a method Brian Toss discussed with Andy Schell on his 59 Degrees North Podcast:

https://www.59-north.com/onthewindpodcast/2014/8/8/podcast-brion-toss-on-the-art-of-rope-whippings

The Brian Toss method seems more secure, but I've only had one of the other whippings come loose. The failure was because I pulled the knot too close to the end. If I'm in a hurry, I'll use Lauren's method, but if I have the tools and a bit of time, I try to use Brian's method. The podcast also convinced me to stop melting the ends. I was reluctant at first, but it does go through clutches easier and doesn't' hurt when you forget a stopper knot and the end pulls through your hand.
I have always had a tough time with melted ends of lines, too. They always seem to mushroom and will no longer pass through the clutch. So if Brian Toss said don’t melt the ends, so be it! No more melted ends.

thats a good lookin whipping.
 

GrandpaSteve

Sustaining Member
Steve,

By first loose end, I meant it as shown in Lorens diagram, above. It forms a loop that extends up toward the end of the line. After all the rows are wrapped over that loop, the last wrap has another “tail” which then is put through that loop. Then pull on the other loose end to pull he loop and “bury” the tail.

clear as mud, right?
Understood :egrin:
 

frick

Member III
If you do melt the ends of line, wet your fingers well and roll the hot end smooth. The water will protect your fingers and none of the melted line will stick to you.
 
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