Windlass Installation for Ericson 32-III

nquigley

Member III
That would be very practical (and logical)
If one can get at the hose clamp, then the shell that comprises the anchor well in the 32-3 could be removed reasonably easily (to check/maintain bow deck hardware attachments) - if you can break the 5200 seal under its lip.
 

markvone

Sustaining Member
On the larger boats the hose is just a flexible hose, held on with hose clamps. Dead simple.
The E36RH has no pan, just a panel for the bottom glassed to hull sides and aft bulkhead. It’s big but shallow (~12 inches deep aft, tapering down to 15 inches forward) obviously for a Danforth to save weight. The drain is just a hole drilled through the prow exiting below the forestay chainplate.
So if you add a lower panel to expand your capacity and it is above the waterline, a simple hole drain may work.
Mark
 

Tin Kicker

Member III
The problem with having two hose clamps lower than the bottom of the bucket is how to tighten one clamp or the other after the bucket is installed? Somebody did it with no access port. That implies Ericson probably used one of two methods. The first possibility was that they put the bucket in before the bulkhead, which is doubtful, as they would have needed to first install all the deck hardware such as the pulpit.

The second would be to only have one clamp to attach a long hose to the bucket. They'd then feed the hose thru the bow, pulling excess through as the bucket was lowered, put some sealant on the hose, push it back in slightly for the sealer to hold the hose in place, then cut off the extra hose sticking out of the bow.

Again, looking forward to what nquigley reports that he finds. As he noted, an access port would need to actually be two ports, one through the fiberglass storage, and the second through the wood bulkhead.
 

Afrakes

Sustaining Member
Dealing with the hose

The problem with having two hose clamps lower than the bottom of the bucket is how to tighten one clamp or the other after the bucket is installed? Somebody did it with no access port. That implies Ericson probably used one of two methods. The first possibility was that they put the bucket in before the bulkhead, which is doubtful, as they would have needed to first install all the deck hardware such as the pulpit.

The second would be to only have one clamp to attach a long hose to the bucket. They'd then feed the hose thru the bow, pulling excess through as the bucket was lowered, put some sealant on the hose, push it back in slightly for the sealer to hold the hose in place, then cut off the extra hose sticking out of the bow.

Again, looking forward to what nquigley reports that he finds. As he noted, an access port would need to actually be two ports, one through the fiberglass storage, and the second through the wood bulkhead.


This is how I dealt with the anchor well drain hose when I removed and reinstalled it. The sealant on the original hose was deteriorated to the point that the hose pulled free with very little effort.
 

nquigley

Member III
Well, the news is not good regarding access to and removal of drain tube and connector
See pic 1. The tube and its attachment is stiff gray plastic, with a rubbery sealant over the threads. The tube pulled out of the hole in the bow with just a little upward force. I used a pair of double-disk suction cups to help pull the shell out. I had a lot of trouble breaking it loose from the sealant under the lip.
Cutting an access port through bottom of bulkhead may be impeded by metal strips used to tab it to hull - see pic 2 (it's held by screws entering from anchor side)
Pic 3 - shows completely empty anchor well. Look closely to see the blue plastic material I used to seal the drain hole in the bow - since it exits just 2" above waterline, it'll let in water easily. (BTW, the hull is about 1.5" thick where that hole is)
 

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Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Looks like your hose is a piece of the plastic piping Ericson used for the fresh water system. Probably Qest -- a pre-Internet-Search brand name if there ever was one.

Qest vs. Pex is a Google assignment every time for me. I like the Qest stuff, however, and the fittings are still available, easy to use, and don't leak. .

How to replace an anchor pan hose with no access?

Well, I'd probably make the hose temporarily 6' long, push it through as you go, cut the excess off at the exterior stem. Seal with epoxy or 5200 or whatever. If a larger hose, drill the hole bigger. [sorry, didn't see Al's mention above. Great minds?]

The access port question seems to recur. Folks who work on old boats cut access ports frequently just for convenience. It's easy and the standard plastic cover kits work fine.

Note: I found a photo of my E38. It looks to me like they inserted a pipe stub in the stem and slathered it with 5200.

bow hoseIMG_2699.jpg
 
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Kenneth K

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
The hose looks to be about 8 in Long. That's good news: If you reattach the lower end first (to the hull-side fitting-- albeit hanging upside down in the anchor Locker when you do), that means the upper fitting will be 8 inch or so above the bottom of that bulkhead, probably accessible from the interior storage compartment if you cut an access port.

I'd probably be tempted at this point to drill a small pin sized hole through from the lower interior of the V-birth, just to see where it comes out height-wise.
 
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nquigley

Member III
The hose looks to be about 8 in Long. That's good news: If you reattach the lower end first (to the hull-side fitting-- albeit hanging upside down in the anchor Locker when you do), that means the upper fitting will be 8 inch or so above the bottom of that bulkhead, probably accessible from the interior storage compartment if you cut an access port.

I'd probably be tempted at this point to drill a small pin sized hole through from the lower interior of the V-birth, just to see where it comes out height-wise.
I think I’ve worked out how the pan and drain were maybe installed:
- if they started with a very long piece (~6’) of the gray tubing, it could have been inserted in the bow hole (it’s a tight-ish fit), pulled through from inside, and then attached to bottom of the pan while it was on deck. Then, as pan was lowered into well, the excess tube could be pulled back out of the hole on the bow. Finally, the tube would be cut off flush with hull. That cut was a bit rough (jagged) on mine, and angled to match the hull.
 
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flycavalry

Junior Member
I am trying to put a windlass on my 30+ and this looks like something that might work

I think that this might work for my 30+. Does anyone know what kind of material is being used for the frame? Also is the frame just attached to the plastic anchor locker tub or is it somehow attached to the deck? I just installed a new bow roller and a new Bruce style anchor. I installed an anchor lock just forward of the locker door. I don't mind modifying the door to fit the windlass.


QUOTE=Bolo;115603]This is an old thread you tagged onto started in 2006! I was surprised to find a reply by me on it. Well, I still haven't installed a windlass on my E32-3 but since then I did buy a used Maxwell VW 800 (Vertical windlass) that came with the capstan. I was planning to install it right behind the anchor locker and simply kick the chain and rode into the locker as it was winch aboard. But I also came upon another installation on this web site and have kept the photo which is attached. I think it might be a E-34 or E35 but it does show a customer frame that runs the perimeter of the locker and is attached to the deck. This set up seems like a sturdy design to me because the load is distributed over the entire frame. I can't use my Maxwell with this design so I'd need to get a different windlass. Also a hole would need to be cut into the anchor hatch to allow for the top of the windlass too protrude. Just another idea that I've been thinking about.
View attachment 24832[/QUOTE]
 

nquigley

Member III
I think that this might work for my 30+. Does anyone know what kind of material is being used for the frame? Also is the frame just attached to the plastic anchor locker tub or is it somehow attached to the deck? I just installed a new bow roller and a new Bruce style anchor. I installed an anchor lock just forward of the locker door. I don't mind modifying the door to fit the windlass.
Attached are two pics from the installation I finished in October.
The only remaining thing to do is mount a second hinge on the liftable lid (the hinge I'll use is the one that used to be in the portion of the lid that now has the windlass).
 

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Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
I have talked to my psychiatrist about this and he says it is OK to bring it up if it makes me feel better.

I beg you to reinstall the original hinge to its place on the windlass deck, so as to hide the imperfection of its removal.

It will only be a dummy hinge, true. But the world will again spin on its proper axis, and this damnable wobble will stop.
 

Geoff W.

Makes Up For It With Enthusiasm
Does that give you any problems when tacking, or is your jib foot high enough that it slides over easily?
 

nquigley

Member III
I have talked to my psychiatrist about this and he says it is OK to bring it up if it makes me feel better.

I beg you to reinstall the original hinge to its place on the windlass deck, so as to hide the imperfection of its removal.

It will only be a dummy hinge, true. But the world will again spin on its proper axis, and this damnable wobble will stop.
Honestly, I feel EXACTLY the same. If I can find exactly the same hinge, that's what I'll do.
- maybe it's not hard to find.
 

nquigley

Member III
Does that give you any problems when tacking, or is your jib foot high enough that it slides over easily?
Good thought.The roller furling drum is about at the level of the top of the capstan, but the sail's tack is another ~12-18" above the drum, so the foot won't dip down far enough that far forward to interfere with the capstan.
But ... even if it did, I'd gladly adopt a less efficient tacking technique to avoid that catch, as a trade-off against not having to haul up ~150 ft of chain and a 33lb anchor by hand :)
 

Bolo

Member III
Attached are two pics from the installation I finished in October.
The only remaining thing to do is mount a second hinge on the liftable lid (the hinge I'll use is the one that used to be in the portion of the lid that now has the windlass).
I too have a 32-3 and am very interested in your installation. Can you supply more details? What model windless? How did you reinforce the forward section of the anchor door to take the strain? Any more photos you can share?

Thanks!
 

Tin Kicker

Member III
Honestly, I feel EXACTLY the same. If I can find exactly the same hinge, that's what I'll do.
- maybe it's not hard to find.
The hinges are pretty common at Defender, Amazon, and the other usual sources. The subtlety to watch for id whether they ster plain SS or polished.
 

nquigley

Member III
I too have a 32-3 and am very interested in your installation. Can you supply more details? What model windless? How did you reinforce the forward section of the anchor door to take the strain? Any more photos you can share?

Thanks!
I'm planning a full write-up for the forum, with lots of pics, when it's totally done, and I can show the thing actually in use.
I learned a LOT in the course of the project, which I'd be happy to share - please send me a PM and I'll share the first chapter in the saga.
 

mordust

Member II
Thanks. That looks great! Looking forward to your tutorial.
I am hoping to tackle the same project next year.

Bob
 
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