Cabin Fever is hitting pretty hard this year.

For the last 72 hours I have been sailing the net absorbing everything sailing related. Even messed with the Harken sailing simulator for a while.

Watching reports of winter storm Linus hit on the Great Lakes. Hmmm when did they start naming snow storms? We here in Yooperland just call it winter!

Boat show season is starting up and I see and that damned-able groundhog should be surfacing tomorrow to give us his prediction. Last year we had Icebergs in Lake Superior until the second week of June and the onset of winter started with 46 inches plopping down in very early November that made last season look like a flash in the pan. What will this year bring us?

Yup, it has been pretty much snowing here with lake affect for the last two days. For you non-Great Lakes watch here and you can see the constant pulse of the grip of winter on us here on the southern shore of Lake Superior.

We try a variety of activities to keep us busy during the grips of Winter:
2013-01-19_15-00-54_921.jpg2012-12-29_15-05-06_287.jpgice dive.jpgsnow mobile.jpg

But even the luge gets old after your hundredth run.

Ohhhhh.........how I long for those above freezing days.........
 

Frank Langer

1984 Ericson 30+, Nanaimo, BC
Hi Jeff,

If it would help your cabin fever, I have about a dozen sailing books (cruising, maintenance, etc.) that I need to get rid of to make room for more books. I have sold some locally on Craigslist, but would be willing to send them to you for the cost of postage and some beer money. I did this once before and sent a large box to a sailor in New Jersey--worked out well for both of us.

Let me know if you're interested (or anyone else for that matter).

Frank
email: franklanger@live.ca
 

Vagabond39

Member III
Cabin Fever

Some good books for this time of year include those about the Franklin Expedition, the USS Jeanette, Roald Amundsen's Gjoa, or Nansen's Furthest North.
 

Rick R.

Contributing Partner
Being raised in the frozen white north, I learned to embrace the snow. My dad bought my brothers and me two Moto-Ski snowmobiles that were a complete blast in the snow. Even rode my dirtbike on the lake in Wisconsin. Of course skiing and ice skating are fun...lol!

I always found winter a great time to create, to write and to enjoy being inside!

Just finished reading Robin Knox-Johnston's book "A World of My Own". Pretty good read about his Golden Globe experience and funny too.

If you want to read a book about a man who lost three sailboats, check out "Sailing Alone Across the Atlantic" by Trevor Wilson.

If it gets too bad, hop on a plane to Pensacola and we will take you sailing!

Rick
 
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Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
If you like pitchpoling twice on the way the The Horn, there's always Miles and Beryl Smeeton's "Once is Enough."

If you want to feel like a better sailor than somebody, there's always William F. Buckley, Jr's "Airborne," a sailing memoir in his wonderfully eccentric style. Buckley was the chief loon back when when public intellectuals were simultaneously entertaining and childish, and whatever you think about his idea of a republic he was a master polymath. Very inattentive to adventure details, however, knocked the tops off his masts under a bridge and once while at Yale crashed his plane on the lawn at Vassar (I think it was, and I think it was an Aircoup) after seven whole hours of instruction (I think it was). Everyone on TV today, and in life as a matter of fact, seems dreary by comparision.

[Nah, it wasn't Vassar, it was his sister's boarding school. And Buckley claims he had only "90 minutes" of flying instruction. And it's Ercoupe, not Aircoup, a fascinating sort of Volkswagen of the air that was really easy to fly.]
 
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Rick R.

Contributing Partner
If you want to feel like a better sailor than somebody, there's always William F. Buckley, Jr's "Airborne," a sailing memoir in his wonderfully eccentric style. Buckley was the chief loon back when when public intellectuals were simultaneously entertaining and childish, and whatever you think about his idea of a republic he was a master polymath. Very inattentive to adventure details, however, knocked the tops off his masts under a bridge and once while at Yale crashed his plane on the lawn at Vasser (I think it was, and I think it was a Aircoup)) after seven whole hours of instruction (I think it was). Everyone on TV today, and in life as a matter of fact, seems dreary by comparision.
I always enjoyed his speaking style, smug and funny. On your suggestion I downloaded "Atlantic High" into my iPad. Couldn't find "Airborne" on iBooks.
 

Gary Holford

Member II
I sympathize on the cabin fever. Up here the lack of snow has been a disappointment and a buzzkill to snowmobiling. And usually if it isn't snowing then it's really cold which is only good for making ice, freezing water lines and staying in bed reading. Earlier we were getting "frost quakes" and they tend to happen during those quiet peaceful moments, i.e. 2AM when you are sailing thru dreamland and then suddenly smashing into a reef.

Oh and don't try working on the boat's electrical, wires snap like toothpicks.
 
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