Choosing a Whisker Pole: Maker, Storage, Size?

Slick470

Member III
Both ends should be pointing with the jaw opening facing up. That way the pole will "fall" to disconnect from the ring and for the line side, the line will lift up and out of the jaw.. If the jaws point down, it is much harder to release both sides under load. Common practice is to ease the topping lift 6-12" prior to a gybe/douse to help with this too.
 
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Slick470

Member III
You can replace your sliding ring with a "mast toggle pin" but it's easier/cheaper for a smaller boat to use the jaw fitting, IMHO.
Loren, the mast toggle pin arrangement forces you to do a dip-pole gybe which I find to be more complicated than an end for end gybe with a pole with two jaw ends.
 

Slick470

Member III
Another thing you'll want to do is set it so the same line trips both jaw pins. That way you can trip both ends in one motion with one hand by twisting the one line with your fist. Some have separate lines, and that works, but I find that it adds complexity. Some also have separate tails on the trip lines with a ball end which is a nice feature to make sure you only trip one end, but I've had the balls get caught on things causing a premature trip... which can be awkward...
 

G Kiba

Member III
Jaws up on both sides for me. Let gravity work with the heavier object... the pole that is. Even if it is carbon fiber.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
I have the simple-pin jaws fitting at the mast end, although a socket is recommended for my boat. I like the pin on the top, so I can yank it down when removing from the ring under pressure. Such a manual system works even on a 38 if you are willing to use muscle and technique.

Traditionally, the pole fitting on the outboard end faces up for a spinnaker, so the line can fly up when released. On a whisker pole, it faces down, so when tension is relieved on the genoa sheet the line falls down when released.
 
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