E30+ Spreader Movement

Dave G.

Member II
Same year as mine, maybe a different spec by original owner or someone has changed them out along the way. I have looked at Rig Rite's site and identified the spreader as a SP3 and the mast attachment plate I believe is on my boat as a K-11295. Now I just need to figure out The specs and characteristics of what I have. It seems that the spreaders are doing what they should and everything else looks good. I will do a little further research for sure and if I come up with something I'll post it. According to Rig Rite they should be attached via a 1/4" pin so I'll need to get one and replace the 1/4" bolt currently on the starboard side.
 

Afrakes

Sustaining Member
The original mast for my 87' 28 was a Kenyon. The spreader brackets were riveted to the mast and the spreaders held in place with two 1/4 x 20 bolts and Nylock nuts. My present mast is a Lefeill with the spreader brackets welded to the mast and the spreaders held in place with two 5/16 x 18 bolts and Nylock nuts. If the bolts are not "dead" tight there is some for and aft movement. Get rid of the pin and replace with a bolt and Nylock nut you can torque down on to the reduce the movement. Your spreader brackets are riveted on so check them for tightness also. From the photo is looks like the center of the riveted bracket is bowed away from the mast. If I had used a just pin the spreader would flop around, for and aft and up and down.
 
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bigd14

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
Interesting! Are all 4 spreaders attached the same way? Is your boat an early model 1984 with the bridge deck traveler or a later version with the cabin top traveler and the beveled cockpit seats? I wonder if the later models changed the spreader configuration.
 

Frank Langer

1984 Ericson 30+, Nanaimo, BC
It's a bridge deck traveler Hull #632, only a few weeks or so before your hull.
My 1984 E30+ is hull #637 but has the traveler on the cabin top in front of the dodger, not at the companionway, so it seems to be a different configuration, and perhaps a different spreader.
Frank
 

Keith Parcells

Sustaining Member
Dave,

On my boat, (E33, 1983), the spreader attaches to the mast with a pin. I had forgotten about that. But importantly, how are the seizing wires at the shroud end of the spreaders? That is a key factor. Then, how well are the shrouds tensioned? Are they loose? If so, that will likely let the shroud flop a bit.
 

Dave G.

Member II
My 1984 E30+ is hull #637 but has the traveler on the cabin top in front of the dodger, not at the companionway, so it seems to be a different configuration, and perhaps a different spreader.
Frank
It sounds like Ericson were producing 2 options for the 30+ for at least a couple of years. So probably it was buyers choice on how they came off the line maybe?
 

bigd14

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
My understanding was that there was a definite transition to the new deck mold along with a slightly different materials used in the cabin (Formica on the horizontal surfaces rather than veneer). Dave G you may have the last or close to last of the older model hull #s if this is the case. It would be interesting to narrow the hull numbers of this transition down even further to see if there was a transition point or if there was some overlap. I guess this begs the question of whether all models older than #632 have the same spreader attachments and that the design changed there as well on the newer models. Does anyone with a bridge deck traveler 30+ have examples of spreader attachments?

Regardless, tightening the bolts, checking the seizing at the spreader tips and ensuring good rig tension is important. And if those are good and there is still a bit of movement then it has worked that way for nearly 40 years and it’s OK the way it is!

BTW is the rigging original? If so it might be worth looking into replacement.
 

Dave G.

Member II
I have Formica on the galley & head sink top areas only. The standing rigging appears to be in good condition but really don't know for a fact that it has been replaced. I will probably look seriously to replace for next season just so I do know for sure.
 

Dave G.

Member II
Dave,

On my boat, (E33, 1983), the spreader attaches to the mast with a pin. I had forgotten about that. But importantly, how are the seizing wires at the shroud end of the spreaders? That is a key factor. Then, how well are the shrouds tensioned? Are they loose? If so, that will likely let the shroud flop a bit.
Hey Keith, It sounds like you have the same spreader set up I do. Do you know if you push/pull on your shrouds that your spreaders will move laterally about an inch or so at the tips ?
 

Keith Parcells

Sustaining Member
Hey Keith, It sounds like you have the same spreader set up I do. Do you know if you push/pull on your shrouds that your spreaders will move laterally about an inch or so at the tips ?
Are you sure you mean that the spreaders will move laterally? No, that should not happen. Maybe the spreader tips will move fore and aft a bit, but not much if they are tensioned properly. An inch is not bad, I think. And we are talking about the boat at the dock, right? It may be a bit different while sailing as the leeward shroud loosens some as the windward side take the tension. But are your shrouds pretty tight at the dock?
 

Dave G.

Member II
Are you sure you mean that the spreaders will move laterally? No, that should not happen. Maybe the spreader tips will move fore and aft a bit, but not much if they are tensioned properly. An inch is not bad, I think. And we are talking about the boat at the dock, right? It may be a bit different while sailing as the leeward shroud loosens some as the windward side take the tension. But are your shrouds pretty tight at the dock?
Yes by laterally I meant fore and aft about an inch while sitting at the dock. The shrouds are tight, you have to exert a little muscle to get that movement and then they always return to same position which is dictated shroud tension.
 

Keith Parcells

Sustaining Member
Ok then, that doesn’t sound too bad, but perhaps a bit more tension is needed.

it may be worthwhile to get a rigger to inspect it, though. It will cost a few buck but can bring peace of mind.
 
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