[E35-3] Mast Partners

Hagar2sail

Member III
Blogs Author
This might be a “no duh” question, but the mast partners that came with Rhumb Ration were in several peices (marked P1,P2, S1 etc) when we got her, and they clearly had broken apart, then labeled with the numbers. One wedge has now started cracking again, so much that it fell out of the gap between the mast and the hole on a close hauled run last summer. I was able to refit it, but this tells me they are tired and done. I have seen those “pour your own” kits, which by accounts are disastrous.

I am struggling to find a source for new hardwood wedges, where have others procured them??
 

trickdhat

Member III
Blogs Author
I did spartite last year and it worked out well. The 35-3 doesn't have a deep partner, so I had to make my own dam. Just go slow and take your time if you decide to use it. I'm really happy with it so far.
 

Cory B

Sustaining Member
We poured our own spar-tight as well. As long as you make a really good "dam" underneath (lots of duct tape in our case reinforcing the putty in our case) it shouldn't be a problem. After 13+ years and a few mast unsteppings it is no longer 100% water tight, but it is still pretty good.
 

goldenstate

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
My boat came with a varied, apparently home-made assortment of teak wedges. One can buy synthetic ones from Rig Rite.


I'm not terribly happy with the shims I have, but I also read some of the horror stories about Spar-tite.
Nice to hear that it has worked out well for some owners.
 

trickdhat

Member III
Blogs Author
Yes, Spartite can go terribly wrong. but so can thru hulls, plumbing, electrical and just about everything else on a boat. If you take your time, triple check everything, and mix up a small amount for the first pour you will be pretty good. Everything has an element of risk. In this case, the benefit of having a secure mast that leaks less (spartite isn't meant to keep the water out, but it helps alot) was well worth the small risk of a mess in the bilge.

I made a wood dam that clamped down on the mast using pocket screws. This gave me a secure structure I could pack the clay against. I'm sure there's 1000 was to do this. Choose which ever one makes the most sense to you and if you aren't comfortable with the dam you've tried, clay is cheap. Try again until it looks good and you're comfortable.
 

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Keith Parcells

Sustaining Member
Yes, Spartite can go terribly wrong. but so can thru hulls, plumbing, electrical and just about everything else on a boat. If you take your time, triple check everything, and mix up a small amount for the first pour you will be pretty good. Everything has an element of risk. In this case, the benefit of having a secure mast that leaks less (spartite isn't meant to keep the water out, but it helps alot) was well worth the small risk of a mess in the bilge.

I made a wood dam that clamped down on the mast using pocket screws. This gave me a secure structure I could pack the clay against. I'm sure there's 1000 was to do this. Choose which ever one makes the most sense to you and if you aren't comfortable with the dam you've tried, clay is cheap. Try again until it looks good and you're comfortable.
Your canvass cover in the 4th photo looks awesome! Made by a pro canvass shop, I presume?
 

Hagar2sail

Member III
Blogs Author
We pull our mast every year for haulout. Does the spartite come out as one piece? Or does it tend to adhere to the boat or mast?
 

trickdhat

Member III
Blogs Author
I haven't pulled the mast yet, but the kit comes with Vaseline to be used as a parting agent between the plug and the boat. The mast is kept clean so the plug can adhere to it. It's also important to eliminate any undercut angles that would keep the mast from moving up. The clay supplied in the kit seemed to work well for that, but I won't know for sure until it's time to pull the mast.
 
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