Ericson 36C advice

gstepler

Junior Member
Going to look at this 36C tomorrow and would appreciate any opinions or advice on particular areas of interest/concern. I anticipate that most of the advice will be "run away", but I've been interested in these for some time but never had a chance to see one in person. I'm also aware that this boat underwent a substantial refit from 2002 - 2006 (https://tatooshsailor.com/) and am hoping that most of the "wear and tear" from being a liveaboard since 2006 is cosmetic and could be corrected over time.

Thanks,
Greg

 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
Have you ever fixed up an aging sailboat before?
How much time do you have to devote to the project?
What are your intentions for the boat? Weekends during the summer? Year round cruising?
Curious for context.
Pictures suggest it was once a nice boat with a bounty of work to be done.
Based on the condition of the exterior, this looks like a single-digit thousands kind of boat IMHO.
39 feet LOA with bowsprit is not small for dock fees, overall work, etc..
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
What a mix of mess and maybe. The engine and alternator are an important upgrade, the propane box is a nightmare (to me), and the chain drop in the V-berth would not work for most owners. There seems no doubt that recent times have seen the boat neglected--looks like the cushions have been left in the weather for years.

The interior shows somebody paid attention to the nav station, but the head woodwork is wrecked. The "cosmetic" issues -- cushions, varnish, the usual portlight leaks--may be quite time consuming and expensive to fix. The sails are probably in need of replacement.

But you know, this is a special model. People who are drawn to it, well, work is good therapy.

The price should be low and the surveyor should not go pale as soon as he sets foot aboard.
 

gstepler

Junior Member
Valid questions, and apologies for the lack of ownership context in the first post.

Just recently sold my '78 E25 #377 and trailer to a fellow forum member. Perhaps not to the extent of some members, but between old boat and old house renovations and restorations I consider myself more than capable. As for time, I'm willing to put in time, over time, so long as I can sail. I don't mind restoring/improving cosmetic issues, but no appetitie for an on-the-hard refit (much less boatyard costs around Boston).

Boat would swing on a mooring during the season, so LOA isn't so much of a concern. Anticipated use would be weekends and regional cruising, for the time being.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
This boat, and anything like it in the price range, will require a refit. You'll have to do most of it yourself, and most of it can;t be done on a mooring.
 

Afrakes

Sustaining Member
It all comes down to what you can live with. I second Christian's concern about trying to work on it at a mooring. Just how big of a bite do you want to take? I spent 8 years on and off restoring a 25 ft. wooden boat. It was a great and expensive adventure, I don't regret (too much).
 

nquigley

Member III
Old teak decks ... from what I've read/seen, they are a horror to remove and then to resurface the remaining decks. Is there evidence of water leaks below? I'm guessing, 'Yes - a lot of evidence'
 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
Greg - if you have already owned a 70's Ericson, you know better than I do what this will take to make this boat meet your standards.

I have nothing to contribute as to aspects of the specific model, but I would prefer to spend more up-front for a boat in better condition.
 

1911tex

Member III
Beautiful sailboat, lines are great....from a distance in this condition. Offer $4K, put it on the hard where you can work on it for a couple of years, immediately strip it down to its bones. Invest $40-50k conservatively. Then you will have a great $26k resale investment for a quick sale. There may be other 36C's available at the same asking in 1000% better condition. I am not trying to dissuade you, just being somewhat realistic...it is so easy to fall in love with an Ericson!
 

olsenjohn

John Olsen
Blogs Author
There is something about the 36C that really appeals to me as well, pretty design to my eye. That said, I rebuilt a 25 foot boat from the fiberglass up and my experience was that it was 10 times as much time, not to mention costs, as you think up front. I looked at the pictures in the link pretty closely and just repairing or replacing all the exterior woodwork that is cracked, damaged, or missing would be a substantial undertaking. Screws strip out, wood come off in splintering pieces, fiberglass damaged below the wood, balsa core wet, etc.

If you LOVE that kind of work and want to rebuild your dream boat go for it. But you need three things in my opinion (besides the obvious cash) or your better off buying one in much better condition. 1) Location, location, location. On the hard, under a tarp, or in a building, a place to work and stretch out with tools and dismantled parts over years. 2) A supportive family and friends that is happy with you taking weekends and evenings to be with your other love. 3) Lots of time and patience and a true belief that the journey is as important as the destination, and each step should be enjoyed.

Not trying to discourage you. If you do it you will be peacock proud of the finished boat and the world will benefit from another classic saved. As a side note I helped a good friend haul and dispose of a partially restored boat from his back yard after 8 years of effort. His wife had reached her limit. He tried to sell it for a long time but nobody wanted to buy a dismantled partially restored boat with the keel detached. We sang sad songs at its funeral, and his wife threw a "damn boats gone" party that Friday.
 

Martin King

Sustaining Member
Going to look at this 36C tomorrow and would appreciate any opinions or advice on particular areas of interest/concern. I anticipate that most of the advice will be "run away", but I've been interested in these for some time but never had a chance to see one in person. I'm also aware that this boat underwent a substantial refit from 2002 - 2006 (https://tatooshsailor.com/) and am hoping that most of the "wear and tear" from being a liveaboard since 2006 is cosmetic and could be corrected over time.

Thanks,
Greg

If you gave me that boat for free, I might think about taking it on, and I love the 36C. First thing to do is rip out that god awful propane locker and second thing is address those decks. They look original which means they were screwed and bunged. That means hundreds of leak inviting holes into the deck core. Could be no big deal, or a total nightmare. Does not look well maintained from the photos and it looks like she's been spiraling down to the low rent district for some time. You are not going to bring her back swinging on a mooring.
 
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