32-3 Spinnaker rigging

clayton

Member III
Tom - I fly a star cut symmetrical like an asymmetrical, I use a tack line through a block mounted to the anchor roller and a pair of long sheets, 3/8" I believe. Not the ideal shape but definitely adds horsepower. Can let the chute go up and out for downwind legs. I've used it all the way up to a close reach by sheeting through a block at the aft end of the outboard track, and pulling the tack down to the block on the bow. The hardest part when I'm solo is the takedown, once I get the foot gathered in the companionway under the boom it goes fairly easily as I can control the halyard. How's your keel repair coming?
Clayton
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
To me, as the author says, the key to these maneuvers is always the helmsman. By adjusting course, you can keep the spinnaker where you want it throughout the maneuver. That's a key to successful symmetrical spinn jibes, too, and it gives confidence. Doesn't work for contested mark roundings when racing, but otherwise it's effective and intuitive. I should add that I don't have an A-sym. Never have, come to think of it.

For me, skinny sheets on a big sail don't work, and quarter-inch would be too small. The low weight would mean less clew droop in very light air, but that wouldn't be as important to me as ease of handling and grab-ability.

The author recommends adding length to the sheets for this maneuver.
 

G Kiba

Member III
Skinny sheets work in light air, but not too skinny. I have 5/16" Dyneema sheets with the cover removed on the non-working ends. The sheets are extra long for the A-sail. We like doing inside jibes where the lazy sheet runs between the forestay and the kite. On the symmetrical we use lightweight sheets that float (Samson Ultra Lite 5/16"). They come in bright colors, almost neon!
 

goldenstate

Sustaining Member
Blogs Author
Tom - I fly a star cut symmetrical like an asymmetrical, I use a tack line through a block mounted to the anchor roller and a pair of long sheets, 3/8" I believe. Not the ideal shape but definitely adds horsepower. Can let the chute go up and out for downwind legs. I've used it all the way up to a close reach by sheeting through a block at the aft end of the outboard track, and pulling the tack down to the block on the bow. The hardest part when I'm solo is the takedown, once I get the foot gathered in the companionway under the boom it goes fairly easily as I can control the halyard. How's your keel repair coming?
Clayton
Good explanation, thank you Clayton. The sail I bought is billed as a 'Cruising Asymm' and has a sock. I am eager to get out and try it.

My boat has apparently been pushed to the back of the line in the small, crowded boatyard. The mast is still up and the keel hasn't been dropped. It's on a cart and they shuffle boats around like a Tetris game depending on what needs doing. I have pulled some of the floorboards and learned little about the condition of my boat. There are some minute stress cracks in the TAFG gelcoat, but no hairy-scary broken fiberglass to be seen. Pulling up glued floorboards is no fun. I think any glimmer of hope of making a Hawaii trip this summer is snuffed out, but my crash is probably an indication I need to practice a little more before biting off a such a big passage.
 

Geoff W.

Makes Up For It With Enthusiasm
Blogs Author
Yes, spinnaker sheets should be at least 2x the length of the boat. I think mine are 70' of 3/8s line and they work well. I run the sheets back to a block at the very very aft part of the outside rail, and then inboard to the primary winch for trimming.

Outside gybes have the clew pass in front of the luff of the spinnaker before coming around the other side. Inside gybes pass between the spinnaker's luff and the foresay. I used to do inside gybes but outside gybes are honestly so simple, as long as you don't let the lazy sheet fall down under the bow. Most assyms have a "gybulator" piece of plastic that catches the sheet, or a good bow person would make sure the sheet is tucked in there once the chute is flying again.

I attach my tack via a block at the anchor roller, with a bolt crosswise through the anchor roller to bear the load. The line gets cleated off at the bow cleat. It's not as adjustable as race boats with the tack line lead all the way aft, but I haven't found it too hard to adjust yet.
 

Geoff W.

Makes Up For It With Enthusiasm
Blogs Author
Wow, I completely replied to the first page of the discussion. Apologies gents.
 

Keith Parcells

Contributing Partner
I fly my Asym much like Geoff has described, above. short luff line cleated at the bow.

With regard to sheets, and halyards as well, for that matter, my take is that line which is thinner than the jib sheets is just fine, so long as they are good in the hand and fit the self tailer on the winches. I don't see any need for low stretch, high modulus rope like spectra or dyneema, though. I think we are much better of with just good old inexpensive polyester/dacron lines for these sails because a little bit of stretch in the event of a healthy puff of wind can be beneficial. With a jib sheet (or mainsheet), we don't want that stretch because we want the sheet to keep the sail flattened against increased wind. With a spinnaker, though, let it give a little bit and not roll the boat any more than necessary or broach when the wind build suddenly. My $0.02
 

bgary

Advanced Beginner
Blogs Author
This is a basic question, so forgive me. An outside gybe means you're sending the sail out forward of the forestay, correct?

Yes.... "outside gibe" means the A-sail passes outside the headstay.

IMO, the easiest gibe to do single-handed: head downwind, ease the spinnaker sheet until the sail is unloaded and floating in front of the boat / in the lee of the main, gibe the main, then trim the spinnaker onto the new sheet. (My A-sail was made for 10k true wind or less... In more wind I'm usually jib-reaching.)

Yes, your sheets will have to be pretty long - twice the length of the boat is a reasonable starting point, too-long is better than too-short. I made my own, with a short length of 1/4" spectra buried in a long cover.... by doing it that way the sail end of the sheet is very light and doesn't pull down the clew of the sail, but the working end is - thanks to the cover - comfortable in the hands, works in the self-tailing winches, etc.

Bruce
 
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