35-3 Bulkheads and tabbing

Canopus

Junior Member
I've got some questions on what (if anything) I should do about this issue. Basically the two main bulkheads, aft of the head on port and aft of hanging locker on starboard, are both lifted about half an inch. Apparently this was due to loose tabbing so PO had tabbing redone. New tabbing was placed along the bottom of each bulkhead which looks solid, but the bulkheads are now fixed a half to 3/4 inch high which pulls up part of the settees.

Would this pose any problem as long as the the tabbing is sound?
There are chainplates attached to the port bulkhead so that is my main concern. Nothing is putting tension on the other side.
IMG_20200121_134407539_HDR.jpgIMG_20200121_134434751_HDR.jpg
I'm thinking of just unscrewing the setee from the bulkhead, pushing it down and reattaching it.
 
Last edited:

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
On our boats with chainplates attached directly to interior bulkheads, I share your interest in their integrity.

I would inspect the bulkhead and its tabbing for movement or any lack of absolute factory stability. Wood does not have to meet fiberglass, sometimes the tabbing does the job. The important thing is that change has not occurred.

The gap between sole and vertical piece--that's furniture, no? FYIW, my boat doesn't look like that. Most or some of the furniture is part of the structure, more or less, so look for changes there too. My saloon settee bunks show no gaps. (And to windward in heavy air, if the 40-gallon water tank is full, they creak like a square-rigger. But the joinery has remained sound.)

By the way, that tabbing in the second photo looks factory original to my eye. Who else would use that loose-weave cloth and just glass the frays on, which is only cosmetic but remains a factory characteristic ).
 

Canopus

Junior Member
Hi Christian,
Yes the vertical piece with the gap under it is furniture. The trim piece and hinge/door are on the bulkhead itself.
That tabbing in the picture is new.
The PO told me he had it done.
Here is a view from the other side (in the head looking aft).
IMG_20200121_134625370_HDR.jpg
 

gabriel

Member III
I'm thinking of just unscrewing the setee from the bulkhead, pushing it down and reattaching it.
To me that sounds fine (but make sure it’s approved by the CW first) as the bulkhead mostly receives upward force from the chain plate. I would probably put some shimming material in the gap so it doesn’t come back down, then maybe cover it with a larger piece of trim to hide the gap.
 

Canopus

Junior Member
The more I look at the bulkhead the more confused I become. I can't find any clear sign of movement of the bulkhead to explain the gap. The (factory) tabbing to the cabin top seems intact. The tabbing to the topsides hull is detached from the bulkhead but the bulkhead doesn't appear to have shifted in that area.

I think the cabin sole was at some point replaced or repaired so I wonder if instead of the bulkhead moving up, the sole is lower in that area creating a gap?

Regarding the detached tabbing (seen below), it seems to be firmly bonded to the hull. In Don Casey's book he suggests opening the gap, filling it with 5200 and then screwing the tabbing to the bulkhead. Any thoughts on this method?

for frame of reference the round thing at the top is the waste pumpout deck fitting.
IMG_20200121_134513151.jpg
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Regarding the gap:

The sole of my E381 is T&H veneer on plywood, total thickness 5/8th inch. The vertical stiles ( vertical trim pieces) meet the sole without a gap. The edges of the plywood sole were screwed into the TAFG. Then trim pieces were added, screwed onto the plywood. That amounts to a heavy buildup of material, as opposed to , say, a 32-3, where the sole is only about 1/4" because the TAGF is molded to accept it without edge trim.

My 3/8th inch temp plywood floor (left photo) illustrates the height difference. Given that the vertical stiles come up short in your photo, I have a hunch you have a replacement sole which is less thick than the original, and hence the gap.

If so, just screw a trim piece over the gap and enjoy the new sole.


x.JPG...xxx.jpg
 

Hagar2sail

Member III
A little late on this party, but on our 35-3, when it is on the hard I have noticed the head door closes great, but there is movement of that BHD and things have "sagged" for less of a better term. Once we get back on the water, everything closes, but then the head door doesn't want to latch and fetches on trim, which would indicate when the boat is supported by water the hull takes on a different shape then when on land and just supported by the keel.
 
Top