galley rehabs

mjsouleman

Member III
Moderator
AS I dream of a time when the sun comes out and Corona Virus is past, I envision a galley make over for Discovery (1983 E-30+). Updated counters, lazy Susan, cabinets, refrigerator.... Oh my.

Anyone want to share their galley updates?

Mark "Souleman" Soule
 

toddster

Curator of Broken Parts
Blogs Author
I previously regurgitated mine.

Of course there are still small details to work on - dividers to nest the pots and such. I haven't made much progress, in part because I have too many options to choose from. I could make dividers from plywood, and/or thin ABS sheeting. But lately I've been considering that the lightest, most flexible way to go might be to sew them up from old sailcloth.

You know how a man with a hammer thinks that every problem looks like a nail... The problem is that I have a hammer, a plastic welder, and a sewing machine! Could play around with a little of each, I suppose.
 

mjsouleman

Member III
Moderator
Thanks for the ideas. On the E-30+ space is always in short supply. Your galley adds space and looks great.

Mark "Souleman" Soule
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
AS I dream of a time when the sun comes out and Corona Virus is past, I envision a galley make over for Discovery (1983 E-30+). Updated counters, lazy Susan, cabinets, refrigerator.... Oh my.

Anyone want to share their galley updates?

Mark "Souleman" Soule


Several years ago we redid our ‘73 E32-II galley. New Formica for the counter and table plus we got rid of the old Galley Maid alcohol stove and oven. My wife was afraid of it consequently it was rarely used. The oven was but an inconveniently small storage area. The stove gimbal feature was only an infrequent place to set a beverage underway.

We replaced it with a microwave oven as all our meals are created dockside 98% of the times. I made a matching style door underneath for the newly created storage space.

Above the oven I put in a silverware drawer with adjustable slots and a matching styled front face.

In back of the microwave was enough area for a small trash basket - something I craved over using the sink. (Small lid in photo)

To the left of the oven was just enough space to put in a 3 bottle wine or liquor rack. I’ve since added led lights under the rack to light it up at night. (Photo below)

A cutting board sits above the oven as well. The board is easily removed for cleanings.
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toddster

Curator of Broken Parts
Blogs Author
That looks great! Does the trash bin extend under the galley cabinet?

One thing that I think a lot of Ericsons have in common is a tremendous amount of empty space beneath the galley. I.e., behind the stove. Even a gimbaling stove doesn't really use much of that area. And on my boat, the counter isn't deep enough to reach around the stove. I have to dismount it to get into that space. The only viable thoughts that I've had are:

A. Make a trap door in the floor of the cabinet to access a box or shelf installed below. That would require emptying the cabinet every time one wanted to get in there, so it would have to be used for something you don't need very often.

B. Some piece of permanent equipment that you don't need to access very often and takes up a lot of otherwise useful space elsewhere.
1. It's about the right size for a watermaker, but one does need access to the watermaker to change filters & etc. Perhaps more often than one wants to dismount the stove.
2. Mount various electronic black boxes there, instead of taking up space in the nav desk or cabinets. This might be hard to do without making excess wire runs, but perhaps something like an M802 SSB radio box or a power inverter, if it's not too far from their wiring path. Stereo subwoofer? That really would rattle those pots & pans.
 

mjsouleman

Member III
Moderator
Those are great ideas, and I may be wildly out of mind, but as a solo sailor, I am looking at the settee area with the table as unnecessary space.

In my mind I remove all seats and table, cut everything back to the bulkhead. Then bring all electronics into wall mounted navonics control center.

Of course, this is the dream of a mad man, but it is the beginnings of a renovation.

Mark "Souleman" Soule
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
That looks great! Does the trash bin extend under the galley cabinet?

One thing that I think a lot of Ericsons have in common is a tremendous amount of empty space beneath the galley. I.e., behind the stove. Even a gimbaling stove doesn't really use much of that area. And on my boat, the counter isn't deep enough to reach around the stove. I have to dismount it to get into that space. The only viable thoughts that I've had are:

A. Make a trap door in the floor of the cabinet to access a box or shelf installed below. That would require emptying the cabinet every time one wanted to get in there, so it would have to be used for something you don't need very often.

B. Some piece of permanent equipment that you don't need to access very often and takes up a lot of otherwise useful space elsewhere.
1. It's about the right size for a watermaker, but one does need access to the watermaker to change filters & etc. Perhaps more often than one wants to dismount the stove.
2. Mount various electronic black boxes there, instead of taking up space in the nav desk or cabinets. This might be hard to do without making excess wire runs, but perhaps something like an M802 SSB radio box or a power inverter, if it's not too far from their wiring path. Stereo subwoofer? That really would rattle those pots & pans.

When I built the platform for the microwave to sit on I extended the shelf all the way to the back. The cabinet door beneath the microwave oven shows the height of storage area but keep in mind it narrows up with the curve of the SS piece for the old stove’s gimbaled swing and the curve of the hull. (Not a whole lot of vertical height at the back.) The plastic waste basket sits on the microwave shelf and is easily removed as the small surround around the trash door lifts off too.

Using a similar approach to what I did creating removable upper pieces would provide you more ease of access than from below. It always frustrates me to have to pull multiple items out of a storage area to get that one item I want. (Regardless of what it is - it’s always at the back.)

Our Ericson originally had a small storage cabinet on the port side by the rear quarter berth. We repurposed that into a full functioning AC/DC Blue Water electric panel with VHF & AM/FM radio included along with usb, 12v outlets, 110 outlet, a small cubby hole for registration, wallets and I-phones. Electronics syncing boxes are in the companionway bulkhead. (Photos of both)

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mjsouleman

Member III
Moderator
I started talking about the galley and it is the first project on my list (a man has got to eat).

The electric panel would be the second project I would like to attack for those long cold rainy days when you just don't want to be out in the cockpit for hours on end.

Thanks that is great inspiration
Mark "Souleman" Soule
 

toddster

Curator of Broken Parts
Blogs Author
The wedge-shaped locker beneath the stove is indeed difficult space to use. Widest at the top, so anything piled in there tends to slide out. Though the angle is probably different on different boats. Currently, I have a small collection of griddles and baking sheets in there, including the all-important Sunday-morning-Belgian-waffle griddle. All heaped up diagonally.
I've been thinking about making a simple rack of dowels running across inside the front of the locker, that would separate and neaten-up the pile. Something like this. (Drawing not to scale) Of course, the sizes of the items in question might not line up quite that neatly - might need two rows of dowels, or some other arrangement.

griddle locker.jpg
 

kapnkd

kapnkd
I started talking about the galley and it is the first project on my list (a man has got to eat).

The electric panel would be the second project I would like to attack for those long cold rainy days when you just don't want to be out in the cockpit for hours on end.

Thanks that is great inspiration
Mark "Souleman" Soule

Hi Mark,
Yes - and since you had mentioned locating electronics boxes in back of the stove area is why I mentioned perhaps an alternate area for it all. ...Better to keep everything closer together for convenience and especially easier access.

Over the years I had added many individual electronic and electrical goodies. The wiring ran everywhere imaginable to get to that small original 7 x 9 - six switch panel located at the back aft portion of my galley area. My panel upgrade cleared and cleaned up a LOT of cluttered spaces - some located in lower galley areas. ...All that wiring going every which way was very confusing to say the least.

With that in mind, you may want to lay out your galley design with “phase II” considerations included. If/when you have some of your galley apart...THAT is the time to run any new wiring or even new fresh water plumbing hoses you’re considering.
The wedge-shaped locker beneath the stove is indeed difficult space to use. Widest at the top, so anything piled in there tends to slide out. Though the angle is probably different on different boats. Currently, I have a small collection of griddles and baking sheets in there, including the all-important Sunday-morning-Belgian-waffle griddle. All heaped up diagonally.
I've been thinking about making a simple rack of dowels running across inside the front of the locker, that would separate and neaten-up the pile. Something like this. (Drawing not to scale) Of course, the sizes of the items in question might not line up quite that neatly - might need two rows of dowels, or some other arrangement.

View attachment 33228

Very good idea. Wonder if you could get away from the dowels going all the way across in favor of pegs long enough to hold the shelves like is done with furniture display cabinets? Maybe even multiple holes on each side allowing for variations in height as needed?

I may give that a try for my area as well. ...Thumbs up!!!
 

Mark F

Contributing Partner
Blogs Author
Hi Mark,

I remodeled our galley a few years ago. One of the biggest improvements was extending the counter area through the companionway. It has turned out to be a very useful modification. It was a fairly extensive part of the rehab but as a bonus we ended up with a large (we are talking E27 here) drawer under the counter/companionway step.
 

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mjsouleman

Member III
Moderator
Kapnkd/Mark,

Speaking of moving wires and plumbing. It seems to make sense to first remove the salon ceiling cover. With the cabin underside exposed, replacing and running up to code wiring.

You guys are great and I am definitely stealing your ideas. What else are we going to do while we sit at home but plan salon upgrades?

Mark "Souleman" Soule
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Trash disposal is the great test of ingenuity on small sailboats. A good solution repays over and over with every stray washer, Coke can or M&M discarded. I once counted 30 such discards in one afternoon.

I spent nearly two weeks turning a hinged trash door into a swinging (hands free) trash door. I consider it my greatest success in life so far.
 

toddster

Curator of Broken Parts
Blogs Author
One thing that I failed to actualize was some sort of lever-operated compactor for the trash bin. I guess my standard size-12 compactors will have to suffice, but I prefer not to wear shoes on the boat.
I used to cruise with some folks who installed a regular electric kitchen compactor in the lazarette of their big MoBo. It's a lot of space, but with six people on board for a week, it was a net space saver. Although there was relatively little packaging-discipline exercised, that I recall.
 

nquigley

Member III
- just a thought ... I've been watching a bluewater cruising vblog in which the couple stow their recycling and their trash in sturdy bags in the anchor well until they get somewhere to dispose of them. If paired with some sort of 12V vacuum-bagging device, I bet the trash volume could be kept fairly small (?)
 

Filkee

Member III
One of my favorite things that my wife figured out is that a Cascade dishwasher pod container fits perfectly in the bit of shelf to the left of the trash bin behind the flap for composting.
 

toddster

Curator of Broken Parts
Blogs Author
Coincidentally, that is exactly what I use those things for. Although I currently do not generate enough compostables on the boat to bother collecting them.
 

Teranodon

Member III
OK, this does not rise to "rehab" level, but some folks may be interested to know that this little device from Amazon

LASCO 02-3213 White Rubber Hollow Stopper for 1-3/4-Inch Drain Openings

is a perfect fit on an E34. The top of the drain opening measures 1-3/4.

Other modest upgrades include a knife holder, and holders for hand soap and dish soap dispensers. Not shown is a thin stainless steel plate on the bulkhead next to the stove. Much easier to clean off grease spatter there. Then there was the replacement of the CNG stove with a Force 10 propane unit.....

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