Hhhhhhhhhoisting the mainsail E32-200 1990

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Right, the mast absolutely needs to be in column. When sailing, be sure to sight the track periodically to make sure it remains in column on both tacks in good wind. (Leeward shrouds will become a little slack, but mast stays straight.)

We can bend our masts fore and aft with backstay adjuster, and the permanent rake can be important for weather helm (but on cruising boats most just shrug). Any "S" curve however needs the immediate attention you gave it.
 

Rick R.

Contributing Partner
I put Tides Strong Track on our 32-200. I can raise the main by hand without the winch. In a pinch lube might hel.
 

gc_sailor

Rule of Thumb, Electric E34-2
My main was super tough to go up (has an older Tides track with crazing). Had the mast inspected and tuned and the surveyor discovered that the sheeve on my deck organizer used for the main was frozen as he tried to get hauled aloft. Changed this to the next sheeve over and it was night and day easier to hoist the sail.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Great basic point. That goes for the turning block at the mast base, too. An expensive roller-bearing block there would help--most boats use 30-year-old, unloved blocks to change the line angle 90 degrees. But even with new blocks, a hand-over-hand halyard raise reveals how much friction there is in any led-back system.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
As far as I (we?) know, no 32-200 manual exists. Or at least no one has stepped up to add it to the archives.

With the reconfiguration from the 32-3, there are obviously changes in head plumbing, engine placement, wiring, rudder tube and more.

It would be a real service to the forum archives if a heroic -200 owner would take it on himself to create an addendum for the standard 1984 32-3 manual. It would be double great if it were illustrated with photos.

It's a do-it-yourself forum and I have a hunch any 32-200 manual will be DIY.
 

Bolo

Member III
Tides Marine is by far the best investment I have made.
There are other threads about it on this Forum.
A slippery track is place inside your main track and slippery slides replace you sail slugs.
Sail raises with little effort and drops like a rock when you uncleat and let it go.

Also, Harken offers a system of ball bearing slides called "battcars".
I researched them but did not use them because they are relatively expensive and put weight aloft.

--Steve
A few days ago we took our boat out with the newly installed Tides track and the first thing I thought after raising and lowering the main was, "Why didn't I do this sooner?!" I had the track installed for me and even at that it wasn't expensive as things go on a boat and I definitely see it as adding a bit more safety to the boat. Plus my "seasoned sailor's" back appreciates it too. :egrin:
 

rbonilla

"don't tread on me" member XVXIIIII
what is the size of the sail?
I = 42.0
J = 13.8
P = 36.0
E = 11.5
-----------------------
I � distance between top of forestay and the foredeck ( jib luff )
J � distance from forestay chainplate to mast
P � distance from boom to top of mast ( main luff )
E � length of boom ( main foot )
-----------------------
#6 headsail luff tape
-----------------------
 

mbp

Ericson 34
We have the reverse of the Tides sail track system. The previous owner replaced the main sail and ordered Teflon slugs with it. I lubricate the mast track with MacLube. I can raise the main by hauling in on the halyard at the mast, and get the main all the way up without a lot of effort. When releasing the halyard, the main sail drops completely into the lazy jacks just like the Tides sail track video.

 

u079721

Contributing Partner
Tides Marine is by far the best investment I have made.
There are other threads about it on this Forum.
A slippery track is place inside your main track and slippery slides replace you sail slugs.
Sail raises with little effort and drops like a rock when you uncleat and let it go.

Also, Harken offers a system of ball bearing slides called "battcars".
I researched them but did not use them because they are relatively expensive and put weight aloft.

--Steve
Yes it was expensive, and perhaps heavy, but our Harken battcar system was amazing - one of the best things we ever did to our E38-200. I could raise the main to within a foot of full hoist by hand. And when single handing I could drop the main in about two seconds into the lazy jacks just by releasing the halyard.
 

Big Krazy

New Member
I = 42.0
J = 13.8
P = 36.0
E = 11.5
-----------------------
I � distance between top of forestay and the foredeck ( jib luff )
J � distance from forestay chainplate to mast
P � distance from boom to top of mast ( main luff )
E � length of boom ( main foot )
-----------------------
#6 headsail luff tape
-----------------------
Hi
Interested in your headsail.
What are those measurements?
I need about a 135-150 Headsail for my E35 ll
My max is Luff 42.5, Leech 41.5
Foot is 14 so something up to 21 might work.

Also looking for a topping lift.
 

sailing42

Pls Contact Admin
I have run into similar problems hoisting my mainsail. I removed the sail and cleaned out the track on the mast: ran a cloth soaked in Brake -clean up and down using the halyard and a 1/4 inch poly rope as a pull-down. I took some sandpaper and a small flat file and gave the plastic slugs a bit more of a taper at each end, then I dusted the slugs with a bit of graphite and re-installed them in the track. Made a huge difference.
 
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