Need this specific advice before purchase

1911tex

Member I
This is a quote from the owner: "We bought her knowing there was a soft spot near the vents and mast and we had that opened and repaired/reinforced and resealed right after we bought her, so that are is now solid." and here is a photo I took, look at the base of the main mast....please give me your thoughts about this repair for durability and future resale (1985 E35) :
IMG_2973.jpeg
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Your survey, with the sounding of the deck, and accompanied by the findings of the moisture meter will inform you. There is no way to diagnose this remotely.
Thing is, and it's not really brand-specific, a core repair on deck is not unusual on any boat after a decade or two.
IMHO, the EY factory did a way-above-average job of sealing every piece that they installed new (in 1988) on our deck.
The inside of the molded-in dorades on the the 38 and 35-3 were/are a moisture entry point until later repaired. A friend of mine had the interiors sealed on his '86 E-38, and there are narratives on this site. It was a rather Cleaver looking design idea, tho.

A mast base can eventually leak around the thru bolts, and under the deck layup in that area is plywood (I have observed this on ours). Normally, a repair involves installing a non-abxorbant coring like G10 or some form of thickened epoxy, from underneath. The original surface layup is strong, but needs coring for strength. There is a lot up up-force from the halyard turning blocks on the the collar, and that's why EY put a "tie rod" piece of short shroud wire on the inside to keep the deck at the mast base from moving. Our boat has this, with a turnbuckle on the inside.

Curiosity abounds -- is there a link for this boat (on Yachtworld, perhaps?
 

gabriel

Member III
I second what Loren wrote and would ad another piece of advice from my personal experience: take what any owner/seller of any boat tells you with a grain of salt. Good luck.
 

1911tex

Member I
Your survey, with the sounding of the deck, and accompanied by the findings of the moisture meter will inform you. There is no way to diagnose this remotely.
Thing is, and it's not really brand-specific, a core repair on deck is not unusual on any boat after a decade or two.
IMHO, the EY factory did a way-above-average job of sealing every piece that they installed new (in 1988) on our deck.
The inside of the molded-in dorades on the the 38 and 35-3 were/are a moisture entry point until later repaired. A friend of mine had the interiors sealed on his '86 E-38, and there are narratives on this site. It was a rather Cleaver looking design idea, tho.

A mast base can eventually leak around the thru bolts, and under the deck layup in that area is plywood (I have observed this on ours). Normally, a repair involves installing a non-abxorbant coring like G10 or some form of thickened epoxy, from underneath. The original surface layup is strong, but needs coring for strength. There is a lot up up-force from the halyard turning blocks on the the collar, and that's why EY put a "tie rod" piece of short shroud wire on the inside to keep the deck at the mast base from moving. Our boat has this, with a turnbuckle on the inside.

Curiosity abounds -- is there a link for this boat (on Yachtworld, perhaps?
I don't know if there is a for-sale link. I was looking for an E35 and observed this one at a local marina..the owner was aboard and said it was going up for sale soon. The quote was from this conversation. Loren Beach, your advice to obtain a survey is appropriate. The quote is from our conversation. I am concerned about this so obvious patch and if that patch at the base of the mast looks like a common repair. My concern is sailing with main, jib/Spinnaker...that the repair may re-fracture? That is my greatest concern. Thanks to all for responding!
 
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Sean Engle

Your Friendly Administrator
Administrator
Founder
...another piece of advice from my personal experience: take what any owner/seller of any boat tells you with a grain of salt. Good luck.
Actually, it's all that way - until you purchase the boat and begin making the corrections yourself - then they'll have take your word on the fixes... :egrin:

Finding a wet spot near those vent boxes is not that unusual. On my boat I ended up just closing it up all together (the winch handle box portion of it, I mean). And yes, you want a survey before you buy - just as you would have a house inspected or have a geotech run over a piece of property before you build anything on it; due diligence is (nearly) always worth the cost.

Get a survey and upload it here...you'll have lots of nosy, er - interested folks looking over your shoulder... If you've never purchase a boat before, you may also wish to pick up a couple of books on the subject. Don Casey puts out a very good, very high level (aka - simplified) series on evaluation and restoration of old sailboats. Then there are the really good titles which go far into detail after you get your feet wet...

//sse
 
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