Synthetic Standing Rigging anyone?

Guy Stevens

Moderator
Moderator
If done again, I would cover the shrouds from the turnbuckles up six feet or so. Maybe even to the first spreaders. We are seeing chafe where the jib sheets run and it’s annoying after Colligo insisted it would not be an issue.

-P
Parcel and serve that six feet. You can do it by hand without a serving mallet even. Six feet isn't much and would take care of that issue for you. For the Parceling I use Friction tape, and then serve it with LFS. In this case you could easily do that in an afternoon per shroud without even taking the tension off of them.
Guy
:)
 

p.gazibara

Member III
I have some googling to do, I have no idea what that means, lol. Hope you guys are doing well. Still in FP?

I noticed you mentioned the only boat that had chafe issues was a “horrible sailor”. It’s possible we fit that category, but we do sail everywhere. Tacking an overlapping headsail no matter what will cause chafe. (Unless you have a bowman walking the sail around the shrouds) Maybe its insignificant per tack, but tack enough times and you will see chafe. Our sheets got salty and crispy on the longer wet stretches and I’m sure that didn’t help things.

I have since switched to softer sheets, but I would still recommend a cover over the lower section where lines may run. If you don’t want to worry about the shroud looking “fuzzy”

We are over a year on our dux rigging, we won’t be going back.

As for the stemballs, if it’s not too hard to swap the backing plates in the rig, I’d go with Colligo’s cheeky tangs. They seem much more robust and put the load in shear. I refitted our mast for them and was very happy with the install.

Prior to using the cheeky tangs, John sent me some stemball fittings they had to send out to machine for me. I have photos somewhere, but the quality of the fitting was garbage. Burrs everywhere and the threads weren’t cut straight.

The stuff John has engineered with Colligo’s name on it looks quality (cheeky tangs), the stainless bits that he hasn’t (stemballs) were complete shit.
 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
My order is in process with Colligo.

Without hesitation, I played the, "I'm active in the Ericson forums and Guy Steven's endorsement sold me and P. Gazibara's measuring issues gave me pause" card. Waiting for my engineering drawings from John. Excited for the update.

-Tom
 

p.gazibara

Member III
Here are the photos of the stemballs I got from Colligo. I don’t want to bash them, John is a great guy and they have some great products, but at least one of his suppliers was a bit shotty. Notice the missing threads, the burrs, and the messed up threads.

I remember when I excitedly opened the package while prepping to fly back to Cinderella in Tahiti. I found this upon inspection and my heart dropped.

John ultimately sent me his cheeky tangs instead (which are far superior) and they got to me just before my flight back to Tahiti (February) five months after I placed the initial order (September). Don’t be afraid to follow up with them and double check things.


Don42C32231-0C79-4F9D-92B6-3C97C0CB99B5.jpeg00F0B998-D8E9-41A4-8511-B9C721DBE66E.jpeg04926D00-E492-4333-9BE1-21754669BF8F.jpeg803E2F78-E65E-4044-9D4F-5AF4D04BBF1F.jpeg9BB453DB-8C20-4733-95CB-C9103F3D90AD.jpeg
 

Guy Stevens

Moderator
Moderator
Tom,
The cheaky tangs are something I worked with John on developing, some of them have a GS for the first part of the part number... I will let you guess what that stands for. It is well worth doing the work to get the cheaky tangs and their associated baking plates installed rather than the stemballs if you can.
There are multiple stemball attachment methods that we can use with the Colligo stuff. Let me know if you get hung up on figuring it out and I can point you in a direction or two.
G
:cool:
 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
Tom,
The cheaky tangs are something I worked with John on developing, some of them have a GS for the first part of the part number... I will let you guess what that stands for. It is well worth doing the work to get the cheaky tangs and their associated baking plates installed rather than the stemballs if you can.
There are multiple stemball attachment methods that we can use with the Colligo stuff. Let me know if you get hung up on figuring it out and I can point you in a direction or two.
G
:cool:
I appreciate any guidance. Is the decrease in weight the primary value of the cheeky tangs?

I’m somewhat afraid of asking to change my order mid-production.

I will send some photos of what I have on Monday. I don’t know all the right terminology. There is a 1.5” * 2.5” rectangular SS cup that can be removed from the mast body and in which the stem ball is secured. It doesn’t look like a single through-bolt on which the Tang’s could be hung. They look sort of like this:
1596255139295.jpeg
 
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Guy Stevens

Moderator
Moderator
The cheaky tangs are better in every way, they are thru bolted, if your cups are across from one another a plate which fastens to the interoir of the mast can be fabricated for each side, then the cheaky tang thru bolt with a bearing is installed through the mast. The cheaky tangs are hung on the bolt. The loading on the spar is much better, the attachment much more secure and the whole system much less prone to failure. The cheaky tangs are significantly stronger, and there is no metal fatigue or crevice corrosion to worry about.
The questions are can you put a bolt between the holes? And does John have or can he make you a set of cheaky tang support brackets that fit?
Guy
:)
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
(Semi Related) Question: is this particular "thru bolt" very much like the invisible inside thru bolt or my Navtec rod rigging on our prior Niagara 26? I did not ever try to remove that inside piece, and our rigging always passed a close up inspection, back in the late 80's. I did wonder just how the Heck they got that inside threaded "barrel" part installed, after our joke about using trained hamsters. (This was on a single spreader 3/4 fractional rig with several degrees of sweep to the spreaders-- we turned it sort of like a J-24.)
 

Guy Stevens

Moderator
Moderator
(Semi Related) Question: is this particular "thru bolt" very much like the invisible inside thru bolt or my Navtec rod rigging on our prior Niagara 26? I did not ever try to remove that inside piece, and our rigging always passed a close up inspection, back in the late 80's. I did wonder just how the Heck they got that inside threaded "barrel" part installed, after our joke about using trained hamsters. (This was on a single spreader 3/4 fractional rig with several degrees of sweep to the spreaders-- we turned it sort of like a J-24.)
String....
The hampsters won a UN court case that forcing any species to work in a boat yard was cruel and unusual punishment. The yards tried to compare the "cushy" life of hamsters to that of caged chickens, and the court ruled the chickens had it better.
One of the early 12 meter boats actually used young children to run rigging through the mast... I have a photo somewhere that I can't find....
There are two methods for fitting the compression tube inside masts. The first is that one side, normally the Port side is drilled out the size of the compression tube, and the other side is drilled only the size of the bolt.
The other way involves some string long enough to go from the tube location to the bottom of the mast x2 and only works when rigging when the mast is down. You thread the tube on the string, and pull the string then carefully put the bolt in one side as the string is removed. Personal experience is that a bamboo skewer or a piece of welding rod is a nice tool to have handy too.
G
:)
 
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