Tricking out an Ericson 32 MK3 for Racing

Slick470

Member III
Grant. The behind table wine rack thingy is relatively common on boats with these fold up tables. A few J/boats have even have them. I probably wouldn't keep any wine in it, well, maybe one bottle, but most likely a few bottles of rum and/or scotch and some glasses. Since our boat doesn't have one, I'd also need to modify the table bulkhead mount to accommodate having something behind it. Our table is up 98% of the time, so it's probably not that useful anyway, but I still wouldn't mind one. What I really want is actual cabinets in the galley. Ours just has this large open topped bin. I'm working through a few sketches to make it better.

I bet thadwoz is loving this thread drift. Planning ahead for the post race cocktail is important too!
 

Geoff W.

Makes Up For It With Enthusiasm
Blogs Author
I think PHRF varies a decent amount depending on what region you're in, based on local conditions. Is it a reaching boat in an area where races are often reachy, or is it made to haul downwind on a windward/leeward course where it only blows one direction? And so on.
 

Ed Valente

Member II
That Olson 911 looks to be in pretty good shape from the pictures, but it doesn't look like it was set up for racing with a symmetrical spin. In theory, the sheave box for the topping lift and masthead halyard parts are in place, but it's hard to say. It doesn't look like it has a mast ring or track for a pole. Boat also has a fixed prop, where you may want a folder for racing.

Racing with the wheel is doable, but with the smallish wheel you can't really drive from the rail which is a nice option. One of the nice things about the tiller is with a good extension, you can sit on the rails and drive from either side and you can reach most places in the cockpit which is great for short handed sailing.

A larger wheel could solve much of that, but the 911 cockpit would require some surgery to fit one since it just wasn't really designed for a wheel. Just cutting a slot and glassing in a trench like some boats have done wouldn't work as well either because the wheel lines up with the lazerette and sail locker lids, which would need to get moved, or made smaller. Smaller isn't great because they aren't that big to begin with. It may be relatively painless to go back to a tiller though, I don't know.

If you are serious about looking, take a look at the facebook group and dig through some of the conversations. At least one of those threads had a list of things to look for that are potential problems.

Oh, and if you do get it and don't want the cabinet behind the table, I'll happily take that off your hands. I wish ours had one...
We’ve done quite a bit of racing on our 911 and have found the wheel provides more usable room in the cockpit for a full crew. Lacking gorilla arms, while sitting outboard was problematic but was easily solved with a 32” Lewmar folding wheel.
We run both symmetrical and asymmetric spinnakers. The latter more frequently as I become more proficient in its use (read lazy). A removable sprit is in the cards.
 

Slick470

Member III
Ed, I'd love to be proven wrong and be shown a larger wheel on a 911. Every picture I've ever seen showed a tiny wheel and it didn't look like it could get much bigger with the cockpit geometry. Pictures please!
 

Ed Valente

Member II
A little difficult to see from this picture, but I attached a snatch block to the toe rail suspended from the bow pulpit.
The tack line is then run back to a dedicated clutch. As you can imagine, when gybing to a port tack the bow pulpit becomes a problem. Hence my need for a bow sprit.
 

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Ed Valente

Member II
Ed, I'd love to be proven wrong and be shown a larger wheel on a 911. Every picture I've ever seen showed a tiny wheel and it didn't look like it could get much bigger with the cockpit geometry. Pictures please!
Not a matter of right or wrong. As you can see, the wheel can fold in allowing access to the lazerette hatches.
 

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Ed Valente

Member II
Thanks. I think the key to maintaining a boat in seaworthy condition, is purchasing what fits within your budget. More so in keeping a boat in competitive race condition. I’m sure we all know people who have bought larger performance boats only to sail them with less than stellar maintenance intervals. In my case the 911 fits within my budget to maintain (fresh sails, rigging etc). I don’t know that I could say the same for a 40’.
A well fitted 30 or 32 will always trump a poorly maintained larger boat with a lower rating. I don’t think you could go wrong with either. Just my opinion.
 

thadwoz

Member I
Andy, The cabinet above the table is a wine glass and bottle holder. Almost useless for storage unless you really like and must have wine while sailing. If you think a little about it you can visualize the staging that must gone on when they were first selling this model. My cabinet was modified with teak boards across the front making the shelves into useful cubbies which i put keys, small parts, binoculars, etc. A false bottom covers the holes for the wine bottles. Just in case I take up drinking more seriously.
I would presume the cabinet would work for your rum?
 
Our E-32 was seriously raced from 1978. Fully setup for spinnaker and asymmetric and Mylar main and headsails.
We have frequently placed well in races. The major improvements were socks and Harkin upwind sheeting straight traveler. We also
added bigger self tailing two speed winches.
The one boat that passes us and we don't see again is a J-Boat that is appropriately called "Blew By You"(=gorillas & $$$$$).
We enjoy wine, food, upholstery, full length tooth brushes, and air conditioning. But even without those, we won't see them for long, but we still beat them on points.
 
Oh, I forgot to mention that we now have a fabric tri-radial, loose footed main, that has some full battens. I like this sail a lot.
For me, I don't Feel that the racing asperations versus comfort are compatible. Our boat is burdened by comfort weight.
For speed, I'm at a half way point, building a hydroplane with a jet ski power train from plans by Glenn-L.
'The more boats....the better'.
 
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