What to think 1980 Ericson 38

Lanealoha

Junior Member
Hello. Sorry if this is a redundant topic. I'm new here, and not well versed in searching these things yet. I'm looking at an 1980 Ericson 38 for sale by the original owner. From what I can see it may be worth going to physically look at because the price is right but not really the location. I understand that its quite possible it may need a full re-fit, but like I said its well within my budget and probably even with a re-fit. Which is why Im asking for any words of wisdom you may be willing to impart on me. Thank you.
 

debonAir

Member III
Check these boats out like you are the insurance adjuster quoting the policy for a classic antique, not the proud new purchaser. The boat could be beautifully appointed and shiny, and be a complete lemon. As I am slowly learning, there are lots of big heavy expensive parts on the boat hidden behind all the shiny teak. Some, like the steering pedestal base, or the engine's timing gear cover, aren't even available for purchase anywhere except used at random wrecker yards around the country. Without a working engine you have faith in you'll get that sinking feeling the first time you turn the key and hear nothing. Just about every other part of the boat can be fixed or replaced by yourself or competent general craftsmen as needed. Sails, rigging, heads, ovens, tanks, electronics, wood, etc. are all "nice to have". Keel, spars, engine, transmission, solid deck core are what you'll want to start with in good shape.

Of course if the boat is dirty and in general disrepair, odds are the important bits are in bad shape as well. Unless you are a real tinkerer, you'll want to be out sailing right away while she slowly ropes you in, so make sure a survey shows the boat to be generally safe to take out, and make sure to keep some purchase price in reserve pending a real sea trial where the engine and rig are used for a few hours at least. The rest of it is just "boat work".

The boat itself is built very well, performs very well, has stood the test of time and will always reward your investment of time and money (and then ask for more!)
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
At a glance the boat is well cared for. The windlass is an important addition, and the bow roller is custom.

Bad obvious stuff not seen. That would be, ruined cushions (expensive to replace), water damage to interior (leaks), bad cabin floor (sole), and overall signs of abandonment.

The engine looks well cared for and clean, which is good news.

Overall, makes a good impression on the Internet. (If you can keep that elevator music on the video from grinding down your teeth).

I'd investigate further, myself. Didn't see an asking price.
 

Keith Parcells

Sustaining Member
Christian,

I see $25K asking price. Not bad at all, BUT in that neck of the woods, check for hurricane damage first.

Shipping it across country would be expensive, I think.
 

Lanealoha

Junior Member
Thank you guys. Ya asking 25K. I'm in So Cal for all intensive purposes. Just thought maybe could be worth it still. The broker says the engine was just re-built and hours are correct FWIW.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Ad has an unexpected error: that diesel should be about 37 hp, and not 47.
First full year of production for that model, and like other sister ships it has Atkins Hoyle hatches and probably ports as well. Good quality stuff. Some deferred maintenance in the vice-grip used for the stem on the master switch. Original head was replaced by a cheapie. Lots of years have passed, tho. Decisions get made according to the needs of the moment. :)
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Nice Ericson 38........

Ha! Ya I saw that vice grip. On the other hand there is this https://seattle.craigslist.org/sno/boa/d/everett-ericson/6885015506.html, which seems steep given the work to be done and done. Thanks for the input, I'll keep looking, no huge hurry unless the right deal shows it self.
That belongs to one of the moderators and long time site members. His boats are always in top condition. Remember that the actual 'real world' difference in a great deal at 30K and a turnkey fully-maintained one at 90K is that it will take about 90K to bring the cheap one up to the standard of the second one...
Never let initial price alone be your main criteria.
:rolleyes:
 

markvone

Sustaining Member
You should figure at least $10k - 12k to ship a yacht this size cross country. Mine was $6800 in 2011. Add the haul out/launch, unrig and pack up and re-rig at both ends. FWIW, paying a delivery captain is the way to go for moving a boat on the same coast if you can't do it yourself.

I would plan to do any rig inspection in detail and mast upgrades when the mast comes off the truck and is being re-assembled on land. I launched right from the delivery truck because my boat had a fresh bottom but add any additional in the yard time and work if needed.

The Cape Coral E38 states a 6'2" draft. Likely a broker error. Factory deep keel was 6'6" and standard was 4'11". Hard to imagine an original owner dealing with a 6' plus draft on the west coast of Florida. A 4" draft reduction makes no sense either. Need to know exactly what the draft is. Deep keel would be fine in SoCal.

Mark
 
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