E28 cockpit drain outlet relocate

RobG

Member I
Oops - I posted this in maintainance and should have here...

I hate the fact I'll have to leave a 1 1/2" below the water seacock open while away from the boat to service the cockpit drains. It looks like I could relocate the outlet to the transom at the same level as the exaust and have adequate slope for drainage. If the height of the exaust is OK for a following sea then the height of the drain should be too? Has anyone else tried this? There is great access to do this. What do you think?

Oh yeah, I'm back after a couple of months absence...another post when I have time...:esad:

Rob
 

Special K

Member II
cockpit drain relocate

I have been thinking about doing the same. I recently had to change the connection from the cockpit drain hose to the through-hull and I don't like the current set-up. Having the drain hose below the waterline does not seem like a wise choice.

I would be interested if anyone has completed the project on an E28 would be willing to share any photos of the finished results.
 

bayhoss

Member III
I've completed and would be happy to share photos. All in all its a very simple operation. Removed the lines from the "T" , reconnected the sink to a single line, left the old drain line in place and used it as an electrical conduit (or anything else conduit) and placed two holes one on either side of the exhaust port. Works great.

Best,
Frank
 

agraziano23

Member II
Man how timely is this? I have a E27 with wheel steering and there are 4 drains going to TWO 1 1/2 seacocks on each side of my boat. I just replaced these along with the others. In addition I would also link to a "manifold" the icebox outlet that currently goes to the bilge and the sink.
 

tyrguy

Member II
Check Valves

So if you run all of the drains to the stern do you (or did you) put check valves in the hoses?
 

bayhoss

Member III
No check valves needed. Even if a good sized wave hits her in the stern very little water enters the hoses. Putting in the reducers and using short sections of smaller (1") hose prevents large amounts of water entry and still allows very adaquate gravity drainage. After being hit with a large wave it cleares in about 2 seconds.

Best,
Frank
 

RobG

Member I
Thanks for the pics Frank

I contemplated this more while I was down to the boat this weekend. Looks like the original intent was the fact that while heeling the leeward drain couldn't drain up hill to a fitting on the stern. I may add another T in what is there to a stern outlet while keeping the existing below water line one. The best of both worlds that way. ;)

Rob
 

bayhoss

Member III
You're welcome Rob ! Healing has no effect on the ability to drain. Take a small piece of paper, draw a vertical line top to bottom. Now draw a small circle on the axis an then put another about one inch below. These small circles mark the cockpit drain and the stern exit point. Now rotate the paper. You'll see that it takes almost 90 deg. to put one level with the other. If you make your axial line 45 deg. which offsetts the vertical placement of the holes by about 1/2" (about where the connections line up) then the heeling required to prevent drainage is about 45 deg.

Best always,
Frank
 
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Keith Parcells

Sustaining Member
Frank,

Your logic might make sense only if the drain does not go below water level when the boat heels. In fact, though, the drain outlet probably does dip under water as the boat heels. That is why the boats from the factory usually crossed the drain lines. The cockpit port side drain crosses to drain at the starboard transom & vice verse. With them crossing, it might prevent the ingress of water through the drain if the transom mounted outlet does dip low into the water as the boat heels. Just a thought on the subject.....

Keith
 

wolly bugger

Member II
I have a E25 CB. My cockpit drain is just a plain hole thru the transom with no hose or fitting to worry about. I never had anything more than heavy rain and spray to drain but it always work good.
Can someone explain to me what are the advantage and /or difference between the cockpit drains set up that is discuss here and the one I have on my boat.

Thanks
 

bayhoss

Member III
Hi Keith, The logic is working ok. The hole in the stern only allows entry to the height of the water (just like the thru hull on centerline from the factory) when and if water builds up in the cockpit the weight of the water in the larger line pushes the small amount of water located in the smaller line right out. This system has been in place for two years now with no issue of any kind. Criss crossing the lines is of questionable logic. If the water goes to the leeward drain when heeling and the hose is connected to the windward side, which should be higher, how does the water drain? Also if you would please note, the cockpit drain lines are directly beside the exhaust line which suffers no ills from water entry as result of heeling. In order to heel enough to have water enter, there would be far more concerns than water entry at the point of the cockpit drain.

Best,
Frank
 
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AlanN

New Member
How did you get the hoses off of the two cockpit drains? On my 1986 E-28, I can't reach the the hoses that attach to the drains from the stern locker, they're too far to reach. Hope I'm making sense...!!!
 
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