Ericson 33 WANTED ( California )

Imagineer

Member I
Anyone on the West Coast contemplating selling their Ericson 33? If it's wheel steered, received adequate love, been consistently well cared for, please give a yell...thanks
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
I have a 32, never heard of a 33....mine is in Seal Beach Ca ++ cheers
Pretty sure he/she wants an Ericson 33RH. There are several owners of those who are active here. I used to crew on one. Fast boat with a large fractional rig and full-on cruising interior. Fun to sail, too. :)
The production run was short, so sometimes there will be a wait for one to come onto the market.
 

Imagineer

Member I
rbonilla,

YES...As Loren mentioned I am looking specifically for an E-33RH. The E 32-3 is a fine sailboat but does not as easily accomodate single handing. Thanks very much & best of luck...
 

goldenstate

Member III
Blogs Author
If you click on the OP's profile, you can see he/she has posted here since 2010 looking for different types of Ericsons, including the 32-3.

Perhaps someone is imagineering some entertainment for himself/herself. ?Quizas a broker?
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Let's ask him:

Imagineer, are you a broker? If you claim a commission fairness requires that be revealed. The site permits no advertisements. Please respond, since if forwarded to the site owner, judgement on your account may be swift.
 

Imagineer

Member I
My..my boys.....we are a bit sensitive on this forum aren't we...

I guess I'll have to choose my words more carefully next time (though I'm at a complete loss as to why).

I have to say, whoever gleaned, from a few words of reply, that I was a broker (of any sort) has a lot more imagination than I ever had... The short answer to golden state & Christian William's question is NO.

I thought I was in the For Sale & Wanted forum?:oops:
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Sorry about that!

I don't mean to laugh, but my message did sound like Moses descending with the Tablets. We so rarely get perpetrators of any kind here and I guess I didn't want to miss the opportunity to capture some hapless yacht broker masquerading behind a blue typeface.

You'e right, Ericson For Sale and Wanted is not on a post office wall.

Accept apologies please. Now we will have to find you that ERicson 33....
 

Lynn

Member I
Yup. Sure did awake a bear...
re. "looking specifically for an E-33RH. The E 32-3 is a fine sailboat but does not as easily accomodate single handing."

I too am shopping for a boat, and enjoy single handing. If the RH33 had a different interior layout, it definitely would have been the boat of my choice since it's fast, and has a fractional rig. Am curious though, Imagineer, since just about any boat can be re-rigged for single handing - is it the smaller fore triangle/lower load appeal, or... ?
 

Imagineer

Member I
Well first I must alay Christians fears of having terrorized a fellow Ericson enthusiast, ALL IS FORGIVEN.

Lynn, you hit it! The E33RH is a light, nimble 32 footer that moves well in light air & I would sail the boat with no more than a 100% jib (or less) & whose cockpit is setup with easy access to all controls near the helm.

I am aware that almost any boat can be re-rigged in any number of ways, but this boat located the main sheet/traveler in the cockpit, where I like it, as opposed to having it on a coach roof, some distance away. Also I like the idea of a boat having adequate sail area (SA/D ratio =19.9 for the 33RH) because I prefer not having to handle a big genoa, just to make the boat move...SMALL HEADSAIL = FAST TACKING WITH LESS EFFORT.

I've read that the boat can be a handful in a blow....and that's why ya need to have single line reefing on that massive main sail! :)
 

Lynn

Member I
Thanks, Imagineer, for sharing your choice of model to purchase with respect to single handing.

Couldn't agree more re. small headsail and fractional rig. At one time this was at the top of my criteria list, but am observing this gravitate towards the ever-growing compromise list, since the price tag of a decent, comfortable racer-cruiser with non-overlapping headsail, is not in my ball park despite the fact that they would be an absolute dream for single handed racing, and sailing in general. On the other hand, rarely do these manufacturers provide the interior warmth and salty character of the Ericsons (not to mention so many other factors).

Traveller at helm also used to be high on my criteria list. For my needs, it certainly makes a boat more turnkey. However, It's now lower on the list since it's not structural - just more holes and more $$, as I would want to be re-locating mine for sure. Cabin top is a pain.

Yup, not having to go to the mast with a single reef line would definitely be the way to go... then again, provided you have slippery slugs.

Good luck on the E33 search. She's a beauty.

Lynn
 

K2MSmith

Member II
"I am aware that almost any boat can be re-rigged in any number of ways, but this boat located the main sheet/traveler in the cockpit, where I like it, as opposed to having it on a coach roof, some distance away. "

I have been thinking about this because I am a single-hander (most of the the time). (and I am also in the market for a boat :).. If you have a tiller, it would seem that gives you the most flexibility for in-cockpit traveler location, but I have noticed on a lot of wheeled racer/cruisers have the traveler right in front of the wheel with the primaries further forward (ex: most J Boats). From behind the helm, you are completely cut-off by traveler, unless you do your steering from in front of the wheel, which I am hearing a lot of SH'ers do - but it doesn't seem optimal. Having the traveler in the forward part of the cockpit if you have a wheel, seems to make the most sense (if you don't want the traveler on the cabin) or go with a tiller. I have not looked at the layout of the 33RH.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
Traveler location? How quaint. :)

Seriously, the key to singlehanding is a wheel (or tiller) pilot. It steers, you walk around adjusting stuff wherever you find it.
 
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Lynn

Member I
Several thoughts on that one K2 re. cockpit/traveler location...
Not sure whether Moderators would recommend a different thread at this point or not, but will share a few thoughts for now... guess this is all relates to boat shopping...

Much depends on what kind of boat usage you plan on...

If I just want to go for an afternoon sail, for example, or a race, a tiller is by far preferable, as it allows me to feel the boat, which hugely increases the joy factor. I don't really like wheels much (another item on the compromise list). Personal preference.

Offshore and long distances are a different story as the boat would mostly be self-steering whether by tiller or wheel-based system anyway.

So many variables... length of cockpit, location and number of winches... width/type of traveller... safety... how important it is to have company...but mostly personal preference.

If my boat had a wheel, the traveller would go smack in front of it. I would not feel trapped because I sit at the side of the wheel the majority of the time, as opposed to 'behind' the wheel. For this reason, a big wheel would be more desirable. More comfortable/better ergonomics, more $.

I look for cockpit designs where the primaries are set aft somewhat - i.e. easily reachable from the side of the helm for single handing. Ideally 2 sets of winches either side. A winch forward allows for crew to trim the headsail without sitting twisted, while the aft winch also provides the option for spin sheets to be controlled from the helm. Again, in shopping for a boat this is another compromise item - 'changeable-more-holes-more-money' type thing... be it extra winches... or for bigger winches for easier handling of less desirable big headsails...

If I had a tiller and a smallish cockpit, I'd be re-locating the cabin top traveller to the bridge deck for ease of single handing.
With a long cockpit and tiller, the traveller would go right in front of the helm, leaving room for crew to move around comfortably forward of the helm.

The big downside with a small cockpit + tiller combo becomes painfully apparent with crew or passengers when tacking frequently... I'm hearing the echo of a friend's familiar lament... "I do not like sailing with my husband cuz there's nowhere for me to sit" !!! Sniff. Seems like a cryin' shame...

I hope this can be of some help in your shopping adventures, K2 :)

Lynn
 

Dave G.

Member II
Imagineer, I wish you all the luck in finding that E 33. I started looking for that same boat and then found out they built less than 30 of those.. so like a needle in a haystack to find.
 

K2MSmith

Member II
If my boat had a wheel, the traveller would go smack in front of it. I would not feel trapped because I sit at the side of the wheel the majority of the time, as opposed to 'behind' the wheel. For this reason, a big wheel would be more desirable. More comfortable/better ergonomics, more $.

Lynn
Thanks Lynn for the comments. I have not sailed a boat yet SH with the traveler directly in front of the wheel (like a lot of J/Boats). From photos, to me it looks a bit cut-off but as you say maybe it's easy to just sit alongside of the wheel with your feet in front. Fortunately, I know a few sailors in the bay area here that are going help me get acquainted with a few boats - so maybe I'll get to try this setup at some point. The club boat I use has a cabin top mainsheet (there is no traveler) and a "dance floor" cockpit, so I sail it SH using the autopilot mostly, but I am not going to be buying a boat like that - that's why I am looking at (used) racer/cruiser type boats in 30-34 ft range...sorry to get us off topic here :)...
 

Imagineer

Member I
My My MY! Whoda thought my simple, single sentence WANTED post would generate such boat banter...I understand though, sailors love their boats and if no boat exists... they love talking boats & I DO LOVE TALKING BOATS WITH PEOPLE WHO KNOW BOAT PARLANCE! So, here we all are.

I must confess...I agree with Lynn (AGAIN!). If money were no object I'd prefer a wheel steered fractional rig with the traveler smack in front of the wheel with a pair of primary winches back near the helm. That's my prefered setup & I too normally sit on the coaming while steering. AND, the 33RH has most of that going for it but with the traveler on a bridge deck (CLOSE ENOUGH!).

Dave G., I know there were just a few of the E33s built so I do have some alternate designs on my shortlist that fit my criteria (but I don't dare mention them on this site for fear of being castigated!). Anyway, Christian offered to help me find one of these boats :egrin:

And K2, I sailed a tiller steered (mast head) sloop the last 8 years that was the perfect single handing boat (with traveler at the bridge deck) until my shoulders decided to go South on me, so had to sell it & start looking for a more adult boat. Hence my preference for wheel steering.

So Christian, did you ever try sailing into a slip under Autopilot? Or tacking with Autopilot? Oh sorry...I have tacked using my old Tiller Pilot (terrible experience though, way too slow). JUST KIDDING! JUST KIDDING! I know of your exploits & always welcome repartee from you.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Quite a few related Traveler threads on the site:



If searching site with keyword 'traveler' there are a lot of hits.

We still like the convenience of having the loaded-up mainsheet tackle to grab onto when entering or leaving the cabin. It's a handhold that's usually in the right place.
Same sentiments back when I was doing crewing and some driving on an E-33RH.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Moderator
Blogs Author
I am basically a wheel pilot salesman. Sure, you can tack and jibe using buttons, but to speed that up requires resetting Hard Over Time. Yes, I believe I could sail into my slip under wheel pilot, which would be a nice stunt. What is more entertaining, however, is to watch a singlehander try to hoist his mainsail without one. And to watch him or her stuck at the wheel every moment the yacht is motoring. And to go below for an instant to grab his kabuki makeup kit, or make a radio call, or use the pilotes machine in the V berth.

Our boats will not go in a straight line worth a farthing except when close hauled, and anybody who sails alone joins me in the celebration, nay worship, of these inexpensive gizmos good up to 15 knots, and to the right-thinking, essential mechanical helpmates who are tolerant, attentive, loyal, and don't shed.

But the world needs to know much, much more.


 
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