Ideas/Recommendations for interior refitting

gargrag

Junior Member
Hi Folks,

During the past 6 months we've been performing a series of repairs in our E25+
rebeddings, re-sealing and powder coating of portlights, re-wiring, new DC panel, AC marinco connector, etc etc etc etc etc

Now I'm thinking about painting the bilge, as we removed the old fuel tank (it runs with an OB now)
And would like to refinish our interior, due to years of leaks and no good TLC, we had removed all the wood on the sides, ceilings and the PU headliner.

My initial idea was to do some PVC planking, but I'm leaning towards a good cleaning/removal of old staples, and do a good paintjob on the interior, to simplify appearance and maintenance, Would love to hear some of your ideas stories here


thanks!
 

Attachments

  • photo1.jpeg
    photo1.jpeg
    312 KB · Views: 38
  • photo2.jpeg
    photo2.jpeg
    245.8 KB · Views: 35

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
You might look up the thread or blog by Christian Williams about painting out the cabin side inside. It looks great on his boat.
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
Save you looking it up. Since the product mentioned (Interlux Brightside) is very shiny, just make sure the surface is fair. By which I just mean filled and sanded smooth.

 

Tin Kicker

Sustaining Member
Moderator
I went with the vinyl floor planks and this Home Depot color matches pretty well.
i-X2cXc69-X4.jpg


i-Mqg28gb-X4.jpg


i-tsjmvgX-X4.jpg
 

Mark F

Contributing Partner
Blogs Author
Hi gargrag,
Here is a link to a Free Range Sailing video that shows some of what they did on the interior on their boat. It is a Clansman that almost all the interior is bare fiberglass;
 

Tin Kicker

Sustaining Member
Moderator
Vinyl flooring planks is kind of a brilliant solution!

How did you end up attaching them do the glass?
You can see the tube of Gorilla Glue while doing the head.
Works fine - Lasts long time.
20191001_184319-4K.jpg


Salon:
20191005_170959-4K.jpg


Worked colored paint (Michaels Crafts) into the seams
20191015_142909-4K.jpg


btw - Make one very straight reference line before the first planks go up.
20191019_133623-4K.jpg


Clamps at ports and I leaned sticks against the middle to press the mid sections into the glue for a day.
20191019_153636-4K.jpg
 

Mr. Scarlett

Member II
Save you looking it up. Since the product mentioned (Interlux Brightside) is very shiny, just make sure the surface is fair. By which I just mean filled and sanded smooth.

This blog post is referenced often and I reread it every time. The PO of my boat tried to use white plastic laminate on the sides of the cabin top to brighten the inside. The poor scribing job screams at my former cabinetmaker self. I can see the logic - "Paint? Over TEAK?!?", but hey, it looks fantastic. I always wonder if you filled the grain, and what, if any problems the old finish presented.
 

gargrag

Junior Member
This blog post is referenced often and I reread it every time. The PO of my boat tried to use white plastic laminate on the sides of the cabin top to brighten the inside. The poor scribing job screams at my former cabinetmaker self. I can see the logic - "Paint? Over TEAK?!?", but hey, it looks fantastic. I always wonder if you filled the grain, and what, if any problems the old finish presented.
PO on my boat added some RFP panels glued with dots of liquid nail, without properly removing the wood veneer, nor sealing portlights and other holes,

the job was NASTY we had to remove it all, and now I'm trying to look forward for a job that I can complete in a couple of months.

I would've happy to go with teak and bring it back to it's original look and feel, I have carpentry skills, I build a couple of kayaks on my own, etc. But it was hard for us to find teak that can fit the boat needs.

Happy to hear more about how to do it with teak
 

DrZiplock

Member I
PO on my boat added some RFP panels glued with dots of liquid nail, without properly removing the wood veneer, nor sealing portlights and other holes,

the job was NASTY we had to remove it all, and now I'm trying to look forward for a job that I can complete in a couple of months.

I would've happy to go with teak and bring it back to it's original look and feel, I have carpentry skills, I build a couple of kayaks on my own, etc. But it was hard for us to find teak that can fit the boat needs.

Happy to hear more about how to do it with teak
As someone who has to remove all that wood as an upcoming project - any tips or tricks?

Was planning on just prying, yanking, and sanding so I'm open to anything. All the trim has already been removed (from the entire interior of the boat because of the headliner removal....a pox upon the man who invented staples).
 

gargrag

Junior Member
As someone who has to remove all that wood as an upcoming project - any tips or tricks?

Was planning on just prying, yanking, and sanding so I'm open to anything. All the trim has already been removed (from the entire interior of the boat because of the headliner removal....a pox upon the man who invented staples).
Hi there, we used an electric multi tool the ones that vibrate, you gonna need to remove thousands of staples. I recommend that once you remove everything you check for delamination as well, use a good mask
 

DrZiplock

Member I
Hey, hey

Oh, I'm already a few thousand staples into the job. Little rusted in assholes that they are. Been fully masked the entire time I've been messing with the headliner because well...see attached photo.

The wood along the sides of the interior cabin is next on the list.
 

Attachments

  • PXL_20211227_191513708.MP.jpg
    PXL_20211227_191513708.MP.jpg
    120.1 KB · Views: 21

gargrag

Junior Member
Hey, hey

Oh, I'm already a few thousand staples into the job. Little rusted in assholes that they are. Been fully masked the entire time I've been messing with the headliner because well...see attached photo.

The wood along the sides of the interior cabin is next on the list.
My wife went crazy and removed all the molded headliner, and I spotted some delamination and some leaks that we corrected
Now I'm trying to figure out how to finish the project, with something that looks decent, and we can handle
 

Tin Kicker

Sustaining Member
Moderator
This looks amazing, how did you manage to get a straight edge at the bottom? my boat has a curved shape on that line

Simple - I didn't. The master line let some paneling hang low so I could trim it afterward to match the existing contour.
Note the master pencil line form the upper end of the plank. That pencil line IS straight.
20191005_152044-X4.jpg
 

Tin Kicker

Sustaining Member
Moderator
As someone who has to remove all that wood as an upcoming project - any tips or tricks?

Was planning on just prying, yanking, and sanding so I'm open to anything. All the trim has already been removed (from the entire interior of the boat because of the headliner removal....a pox upon the man who invented staples).
Vibrating multitool to score the panels into sections, then pull.
The only trick or thing to beware of is that you need to cut through the wood to the fiberglass (without cutting into it) along the bottom of the headliner fabric.
IMG_3670-X4.jpg


Then mask up and use # 60 grit on the belt sander to get the remaining teak off.
20190615_161545-X4.jpg


It's impossible to get all those danged staples out from below the side decks so don't waste time and just pound each in.

The problem was more with the wood holding the upper headliner separating from the fiberglass like below. Since you cut away most of the wood already, there's only an inch or two in remaining width.
20191019_162226-X4.jpg


I put some Gorilla Glue in the gaps and then propped a stick against the staples from the floor or bench to apply pressure till it hardened.
 

Loren Beach

O34 - Portland, OR
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
For a replacement headliner idea, check out reply 5 in this thread: https://ericsonyachts.org/ie/threads/made-from-real-naugas.18658/#post-143994

You will need to make a good pattern, with about an extra inch of fabric at the edges. You will slice off the excess after stretching it into place and driving new staples.
Any good upholstery shop should be able to make it, and best of all you can have zippers put right where you want them to access all of the house top bolts/hardware.
 

Tin Kicker

Sustaining Member
Moderator
May work for the roof but I couldn't get a pattern to work for the compound curve (3D) of the window belt.
I first tried making a panel of the vinyl planks and since the pattern wouldn't lay flat (2D) the planks didn't lay nicely against the fiberglass and I tossed that assembly. It turned out easier and a heck of a lot faster to just put the planks straight onto the fiberglass.

The attempt:
20191005_134755-X4.jpg
 

Christian Williams

E381 - Los Angeles
Senior Moderator
Blogs Author
always wonder if you filled the grain, and what, if any problems the old finish presented.

In my case the teak interior cabin house was discolored and rotted under the fixed ports. I saved it by hardening those areas with CPES and then a local coat of epoxy for rock solid. I think if the existing wood can be preserved, that allows good options for paint or new teak veneer.

The surface, Ericson satin varnish, came out too ugly to varnish. I just sanded it smooth and primed and sanded again. The painting with Brightside was easy enough. I also painted the aluminum portlight trim, which if it's looking funky is a simple solution. Even a can of Rustoleum spray paint works for that.
 
Top